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New York Jets Dilemma: Braylon Edwards or Santonio Holmes; Who Stays?

FOXBORO, MA - JANUARY 16:  Braylon Edwards #17 and Santonio Holmes #10 of the New York Jets celebrate on their way to defeating the New England Patriots 28 to 21 victory over the New England Patriots during their 2011 AFC divisional playoff game at Gillette Stadium on January 16, 2011 in Foxboro, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
Al Bello/Getty Images
Christopher NicholasContributor IIIJune 2, 2016

Swann and Stallworth, the Marks Brothers, Wayne and Harrison, Carter and Moss, Holt and Bruce, Rice and Taylor. Holmes and Edwards? Well maybe they're not that good, but they are that important to their team. Of the 3,291 yards Mark Sanchez passed for, Santonio Holmes and Braylon Edwards accounted for 50 percent of those yards. So the question is which one of these receivers will the New York Jets keep? 

The current CBA will only allow the Jets to keep one of these receivers, and here is a breakdown of their only season together on the Jets.

Santonio Holmes put together an impressive season, since he only played in 12 games. His four-game suspension was a little bit of a hiccup in an otherwise good year. His past should be somewhat of a concern though.

Since 2006 he's had a disorderly conduct, domestic violence and the reason he was traded to the Jets was his arrest for possession of marijuana. All that was accomplished in about three years. Two of those happened in Ohio and Pittsburgh. Imagine if he was in New York.

Now I'm not going to say that everyone else in the league is leading a "clean," private life but Holmes needs to keep a clean rap sheet for a while. 

Holmes' on-field presence though is imperative to a championship team. This season he caught 52 passes for 746 yards and six touchdowns. His has a knack for making big plays. One of those touchdowns was the game-winning one against the Texans in the final seconds. He had a key catch in the overtime nail-bitter against Detroit to set up the game-winning field goal.

His most impressive catch was obviously his game-winner in Super Bowl 43 against the Arizona Cardinals. Holmes is a Lynn Swann-type of receiver. What I mean is that he should not be measured by his statistics but by catches and yards after catch. That is where he shines and should be effective in this offense.

There is one slight advantage that Edwards has: Holmes is 5'11" and Edwards is 6'3". Holmes won't be able to give the Jets many options in a goal line formation like a nice fade route against a weak corner. 

This season, Edwards had 53 catches with 904 receiving yards and seven touchdowns and he played an entire season. Braylon Edwards has had one good season...on another team. That is essentially the only compliment I can give him. Besides that one season, he has never had another 1,000-yard receiving or double-digit touchdown season.

Other than the height advantage, Edwards is not the receiver Holmes is. Edwards is a poor man's Randy Moss, or, simply put, the only route he runs is a seam, back-side seam and the occasional comeback. The problem is that he won't catch the ones that literally hit him in the hands.

Just like Holmes, he also has had some legal trouble. There was the incident that got him traded where he punched a nightclub promoter. His most recent altercation would be his DUI where he blew twice the legal limit. He was arrested and is still serving probation. 

So which one would you keep if you were owner Woody Johnson or GM Mike Tannanbaum?

Personally, and obviously, I would keep Holmes. His intangibles are immeasurable and he is a more versatile receiver than Edwards, and I've never seen Holmes drop a pass when no one was around and he's never led the league in dropped passes.

Where can I comment?

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