Josh Mauro NFL Draft 2014: Highlights, Scouting Report and More

Darren PageFeatured ColumnistMarch 24, 2014

SALT LAKE CITY, UT - OCTOBER 12: Josh Mauro #90 of the Stanford Cardinal plays in a game against the Utah Utes during the first half of an NCAA football game October 12, 2013 at Rice Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
George Frey/Getty Images

Josh Mauro, DE, Stanford (HT: 6’5⅞” WT: 271 lbs)

 

 

NFL Comparison: Corey Wootton, DE, Minnesota Vikings

Combine Weigh-In
HeightWeightArmHand
605727133"9 1/2"
NFL.com
Combine Workout
40-yd dash10-yd splitVertBroad3-ConeBench
5.211.7532"9'8"7.4321
NFL.com

Positives

  • Plays with proper leverage despite being a taller defensive lineman.
  • Disciplined. Maintains gap control and plays to his assignments.
  • Fine snap anticipation and initial quickness. Frequently the first defensive lineman off the ball.
  • Active hands, plays with them in the frame of blockers.
  • Too quick for cutoff or scoop blocks, follows pulls very well.
  • Creates backfield disruption through quick first step and ability to shoot gaps or slide off blockers quickly.
  • Has some flexibility to side-step and bend around blockers and get into the backfield.
  • Active pass-rusher who doesn’t get locked up and run out of ideas.
  • Has a hit-or-miss spin move as an interior rusher, very good starting point.
  • Does a better job of getting hands up to deflect passes than statistics indicate.
  • Proven versatility, played meaningful snaps at multiple positions on the Stanford defensive line.

 

Negatives

  • More of an opportunistic player than a dominant aggressor up front.
  • Too thin for interior line play and may not be a candidate for significant weight gain.
  • Lacks sufficient strength in his hands to control blocks and quickly shed.
  • Too often directs his momentum upwards instead of outwards.
  • Will drop his head and lose eye contact with the football while engaged.
  • Too easily knocked back on first contact by double-teams or combo blocks.
  • Loses his base and gets pancaked every so often.
  • Doesn’t have optimal bulk or strength from the lower body to anchor doubles and create congestion at the line of scrimmage.
  • Struggles to keep combo blocks from reaching his linebackers.
  • Too often loses his footing and ends up on his knees on first contact.
  • Lacks functional strength to compress the pocket with power rushes.
  • Mechanical and stiff mover, limits usage of finesse rush moves.
  • Limited speed to chase down plays in pursuit.
Collegiate Statistics
YearTeamTacklesTFLSacksFFPDINT
2010Stanford700010
2011Stanford422010
2012Stanford1975000
2013Stanford5112.54211
Sports-Reference.com

 

Personal Notes

  • 3-star prospect in recruiting class of 2009, 61st-ranked defensive end according to Rivals
  • 2013 Pac-12 Honorable Mention. 
  • Played quarterback as well as defensive end in high school. 
  • 2014 East-West Shrine Game participant.

 

Ratings Chart

Graph made at nces.ed.gov.

 

Overall

Josh Mauro was quite a productive player for the Stanford Cardinal, especially as a senior, in a defense with as much front seven talent as anyone.

He possesses a few traits that should get him drafted, but an identity crisis exists. Mauro is built like a 4-3 end, plays like a 4-3 under tackle, but almost has to be projected as a 3-4 defensive end.

Whichever team pulls the trigger will try to build around his initial quickness, but I see no obvious fit for base defensesat least right away.

 

Draft Projection: 7th Round-UDFA