NFL Draft Day Games, Part III: The Twitter Game

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NFL Draft Day Games, Part III: The Twitter Game
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[This is Part III of a series of games to play during the NFL draft. Here is Part I: The Basic Draft Game and Part II: The Ball n' Chain Game in case you missed them.]

We wouldn't have a well rounded set of competitions if we weren't incorporating today's modern toys and vices. Today, any sportswriter worth his words uses Twitter and often, when you have the right comments or insights, responds to messages and gives his own feedback.

So let's have some fun with that.

(Remember, we're using football scoring values for these games; no one can stop you from converting those point amounts into cash amounts or volumes of a particular drink, should you so choose.)

Objective: Get mentions and retweets from sportswriters.

 

Game:

1) Before the draft starts, go around the room/the bar and everyone name two or three different sportswriters. You can’t name a sportswriter you have met or know. (Group can vote down selections for any other suspect reasons.)

Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images
No no, my good side. Get my good side.

2) Aggregate and make sure everyone knows the sportswriters’ Twitter handles. This is your pool of Targets.

3) During the draft, @-message any Target insights, reactions, stories or, most importantly, smart-alec comments about a selection or commentator. Basically, any commentary on the draft that you think will be retweeted.

4) You may message one comment to one writer. Do not repeat comments to other writers; do not repeat the same comment to the same writer. You may message one writer as much as you want, as long as you’re changing the point of the message. (In other words, don't be a dork and psychotically flood the Twitter-o-sphere.)

5) Get a response.

 

Scoring:

Extra Point (one): A broad reply to your @-Tweet where you’re lumped in with any other Twitter handles.

Field Goal (three): A pure retweet. They don’t say anything, but do pass it on to their audience.

Touchdown (six): A response from a writer you selected where the writer takes the time to add text of his own, whether a question, comment, whatever, to your original tweet.

Chris McGrath/Getty Images
Tough one

Touchdown + Extra Point (seven): A response from a writer you selected where the writer takes the time to add text of his own, whether a question, comment, whatever, to your original tweet, and throws in a compliment/laugh.

Touchdown + Field Goal (nine): A response from a writer someone else selected where the writer takes the time to add text of his own to your original tweet.

Touchdown + Field Goal + Extra Point (10): A response from a writer someone else selected where the writer takes the time to add text of his own to your original tweet, and throws in a compliment/laugh.

Two Touchdowns + Extra Point bonus (14-plus): In addition to whatever points you earned for the response, the sportswriter then follows you back.

 

Personal fouls

Messaging the writer, “Help me! I’m playing a game and need you to retweet my next message to win!” or something lame like that. Lose 14 points. (And buy dinner/the next round)

Tweeting the same comment or suspiciously similar versions of the same comment to multiple writers. Lose 10 points.

 

Advanced Version

If you really want to turn your amps up to 11, use the same rules as above, but the responding sportswriters’ number of Twitter Followers, divided by 10,000, equals a scoring multiplier. (Followers/10,000 = Multiplier)

So, for instance, if you get a response from Adam Schefter (534,000 followers), multiply whatever the score was for that response by a whopping 53.4.

If you get a response from Merril Hoge (25,000 followers), you multiply your score for that response by only 2.5. The obvious gamble is that Hoge is 25-times more likely to respond than Schefter.

Have fun.

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