Barry Bonds Guilty: 5 Reasons the Jury Would Not Convict on Perjury Charges

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Barry Bonds Guilty: 5 Reasons the Jury Would Not Convict on Perjury Charges
David Paul Morris/Getty Images

Barry Bonds was found guilty by a jury of his peers on Wednesday afternoon for obstruction of justice, but that same jury was unable to conclude whether or not Bonds lied about knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs during his career.

The obstruction of justice charge stems from the testimony Bonds made regarding the investigation into the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO), which has been under investigation by the federal government since 2002. The jury concluded that Bonds misled or impeded a grand jury investigation.

The three counts of lying to a grand jury stem from testimony Bonds made about whether or not he knew that the injections he was given were steroids, or that he was given injections by anyone other than a physician.

While there is much speculation regarding Bonds’ trial, it essentially amounted to a mistrial, as Judge Susan Illston concluded that the jurors would be unable to come to an agreement as to guilt or innocence regarding the remaining charges against Bonds.

Which leads to the next question: Why was the jury unable to reach a conclusion?

We will examine five possible reasons why the jury was unable to convict Barry Bonds on the remaining charges of lying to a grand jury.

For continuing coverage of Major League Baseball, follow Doug on Twitter @Sports_A_Holic.

*Portions of information found in this article can be found here.

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