MLB: Ranking the New York Yankees and All 30 Teams by Success

Rich StoweAnalyst IIIApril 6, 2011

MLB: Ranking the New York Yankees and All 30 Teams by Success

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    What is considered success for a MLB franchise?  Is it simply finishing as the Wild Card?  Is it finishing the season above .500?  Is it only winning the World Series?

    Are the Cardinals a better franchise in history than the Cubs?  Are the Giants better than the Dodgers?  Where do the Red Sox stand?he debate can be ended.

    I decided to figure out how successful each franchise has been in their history.  To do this I came up with a point system (this removed any possible bias on my part towards or against one franchise) and the following categories:

    - three points for finishing in first place

    - one point for gaining a Wild Card berth

    - five points for appearing in the World Series

    - ten points for winning the World Series

    - two points for each 100+ win season

    - one point for each 90-99 win season

    - then I figured out just how frequently each team won the World Series (years in existence/World Series wins) and the more frequently the team won, the more points they got on a scale of 30 (most frequently winning the Series) down to 1 (never winning)

    - I added up all those points and based on that came up with the rankings.  If there was a tie, the team that has either been around for less years got the edge or if that was equal, the team that won the Series more frequently got the edge in the ranking.

    It should be noted that due to the lesser number of teams and no playoffs except World Series back in the day, the older the franchise is, the more they benefitted.  Also, the years in existence accounts for that team's entire existence, no matter the city they were in or the name they used (i.e. the Yankees years in existence include their days as the Highlanders and Orioles in the early 1900s).

     

    Let's take a look at where each MLB franchise is ranked, starting with number 30 and working our way up to the most successful franchise in MLB history.

Number 30: The Washington Nationals

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    Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  42

    First place finishes:  1 (3 points)

    Wild Card apperances:  0

    World Series appearances: 0

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  4 (4 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 30th out of 30 teams - 1 point)

    Total points:  8

    The Nationals have had one great season but it was ended by the strike in 1994.  The future is looking up for the Nationals however with recent draft picks (Harper, Strasburg) and the recent willingness to spend money on free agents (Werth).  Will this lead to success in the future?  Only time will tell.

Number 29: the Colorado Rockies

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    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  18

    First place finishes:  0

    Wild Card appearances:  3 (3 points)

    World Series appearances: 1 (5 points)

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  2 (2 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 24th out of 30 teams - 7 points)

    Total points:  17

    The Rockies were the fastest expansion team to ever make the playoffs (made it in their third season).  They recently have been making late-season runs to make the playoffs with strong August and Septembers.  They have one of the best young pitchers in the game (Jimenez), a couple of great young players (Gonzalez and Tulowitzki) and should continue to improve in the near future.

Number 28: the Seattle Mariners

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    Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  34

    First place finishes:  3 (9 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 points)

    World Series appearances:  0

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  1 (2 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  4 (4 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 29th out of 30 teams - 2 points)

    Total points:  18

    The Mariners had one historic season in which they won 116 regular season games, but lost in the playoffs.  They've had some of the greatest hitters (Ken Griffey Jr. and Alex Rodriguez) and pitchers (Randy Johnson) but never have been able to make the World Series.  Today's Mariners are one of the worst offensive teams in baseball but they do have Felix Hernandez taking the mound every five days.  Outside of King Felix, I don't forsee much success in the near future for this team.

     

Number 27: the Tampa Bay Rays

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    J. Meric/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  13

    First place finishes:  2 (6 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  1 (5 points)

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  2 (2 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 23rd out of 30 teams - 8 points)

    Total points:  21

    The Rays first decade of existence was miserable however, with a roster of mainly young players, they finally broke through and found success finishing in first place in the tough AL East twice and even made the World Series in recent seasons.  They have a handful of great young players like David Price and Evan Longoria but this past offseason was a step back for the franchise.  It's going to be tough for them to duplicate their recent success in the coming years but they have shown they know how to develop within and I have no doubt they'll be contenders again soon.

Number 26: the Milwaukee Brewers

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    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  42

    First place finishes:  2 (6 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  1 (5 points)

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  6 (6 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 26th out of 30 teams - 5 points)

    Total points:  23

    The Brewers have always seemed to be a middle-of-the-pack team with occasional flashes of success.  They have some good young players like Ryan Braun, Prince Fielder and Zach Greinke but in recent seasons haven't been able to not lose their best players to free agency and this is what will make it tough for them to find success over the long term.  I believe the Brewers will always be a team that's right on the verge of success but will fall just short.

Number 25: the Texas Rangers

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    Christian Petersen/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  50

    First place finishes:  5 (15 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  1 (5 points)

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  4 (4 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 28th out of 30 teams - 3 points)

    Total points:  27

    The Rangers had some success in the late 1990s but fell short in the playoffs.  In 2010 they finally broke through and made the World Series.  They have some good young players like Josh Hamilton and Neftali Feliz and with new ownership who so far have shown a willingness to improve the team, the Rangers should continue to find success in the coming seasons.  I wouldn't be suprised to see them in another World Series in a couple of years and can even see them winning it all.

Number 24: the San Diego Padres

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    Donald Miralle/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  42

    First place finishes:  5 (15 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  2 (10 points)

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  4 (4 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 25th out of 30 teams - 6 points)

    Total points:  35

    The Padres had one great season in 1998 in which they made the World Series only to run into one of the best teams in baseball history in the 1998 Yankees.  The Padres are more known for their "fire sales" in which they get rid of any talent they have.  The Padres always seem to be in "rebuilding mode" but will occasionally find some regular season success.  Until they actually keep their young talent, I can't see this team finding the ultimate success.

Number 23: the Houston Astros

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    Rob Carr/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  49

    First place finishes:  6 (18 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  2 (2 points)

    World Series appearances:  1 (5 points)

    World Series wins:  0

    100+ win seasons:  1 (2 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  5 (5 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Never won (ranked 27th out of 30 teams - 4 points)

    Total points:  36

    The Astros have several seasons of success in their history but recently started "rebuilding".  They couldn't find the ultimate success with the best teams they ever had, so I don't think they'll succeed in the near future with the team as it's comprised today.  I'm not sure what it will take to make the Astros competitive (new ownership etc) but if something doesn't change they will continue to be near the bottom of their division for years to come. 

Number 22: the Arizona Diamondbacks

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    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  13

    First place finishes:  4 (12 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series Apperances:  1 (5 points)

    World Series wins:  1 (10 points)

    100+ win seasons:  1 (2 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  3 (3 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 13 years (ranked 5th out of 30 teams - 26 points)

    Total points:  58

    The Diamondbacks' best season came in 2001 when behind the arms of Curt Schilling and Randy Johnson won the World Series.  They benefit from playing in a division that doesn't have consistency in which team finishes in first, so they have a good chance of finding success.  They also have begun rebuilding with young players like Justin Upton so I believe they have a good chance at finding at least regular season success in the near future. 

Number 21: the Kansas City Royals

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    Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  42

    First place finishes:  6 (18 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  2 (10 points)

    World Series wins:  1 (10 points)

    100+ win seasons:  1 (2 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  7 (7 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 42 years (ranked 17th out of 30 teams - 14 points)

    Total points:  61

    The Royals best years came during the George Brett years.  Since then, they may occasionally have a decent season but that's it.  They can't hold on to their top stars (and the ones they do keep like Mike Sweeney toil in obscurity).  Until the Royals' prospects pan out and they can keep/bring in free agents, I don't foresee success in their future.

Number 20: the Los Angeles Angels

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    J. Meric/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  50

    First place finishes:  8 (24 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  1 (5 points)

    World Series wins:  1 (10 points)

    100+ win seasons:  1 (2 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  9 (9 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 50 years (ranked 19th out of 30 teams - 12 points)

    Total points:  63

    The Angels had a long string of success in the 2000s including their World Series victory.  Recently the Angels have begun "rebuilding" but this past offseason they missed out on acquiring key free agents such as Carl Crawford.  With teams like the Rangers and the Athletics in their division improving, finding success is going to be tough for the Angels.  However, their owner has shown a willingness to go after free agents so I wouldn't be surprised to find them at the top of their division once again in a couple of years.

Number 19: the Florida Marlins

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    Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  18

    First place finishes:  0

    Wild Card appearances:  2 (2 points)

    World Series appearances:  2 (10 points)

    World Series wins:  2 (20 points)

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  2 (2 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 9 years (ranked 2nd out of 30 teams - 29 points)

    Total points:  63

    I was suprised to find the Marlins ranked this high; but two World Series wins in 18 years helps.  The Marlins are known for their "fire sales" in which they get rid of any talent the year after they win a World Series, only to rebuild and make the World Series again with a decade.  They have some great young players like Hanley Ramirez and Josh Johnson and as long as they can find lightning in a bottle like they always manage to do, I wouldn't be surprised to see them finding success again in the future.

Number 18: the New York Mets

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    Drew Hallowell/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  49

    First place finishes:  5 (15 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  2 (2 points)

    World Series appearances:  4 (20 points)

    World Series wins:  2 (20 points)

    100+ win seasons:  3 (6 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  7 (7 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 24.5 years (ranked 10th out of 30 teams - 21 points)

    Total points:  91 (due to error on Blue Jays slide the Mets are actually ranked 17th overall)

    The Mets have periods of success followed by seasons of futility.  Recently, the Mets have fallen on hard times mainly due to injuries and lack of production from their stars.  Until their owner's off-the-field money issues are resolved, I just can't see the Mets competing, especially in the NL East where the Phillies have become the powerhouse and the Braves/Marlins are always in the mix.

Number 17: the Cleveland Indians

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    Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  10 (30 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  5 (25 points)

    World Series wins:  2 (20 points)

    100+ win seasons:  2 (4 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  15 (15 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 55 years (ranked 20th out of 30 teams - 11 points)

    Total points:  105 (due to error on Blue Jays slide the Indians are actually ranked 16th overall)

    We finally come to our first franchise that has been around for over 100 years.  The Indians have the second longest active streak behind the Cubs of not winning the World Series.  They came close in 1997, only to lose to the Marlins.  The Indians went through a stretch were they were perennial contenders, but recently have lost their best players through trades (Sabathia and Lee) and have started rebuilding.  It's going to be hard for them to compete in the tough AL Central where the Twins, Tigers and White Sox all are ready to compete now and for the near future.

Number 16: the Philadelphia Phillies

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    Rob Carr/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  128

    First place finishes:  12 (36 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  7 (35 points)

    World Series wins:  2 (20 points)

    100+ win seasons:  2 (4 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  10 (10 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 64 years (ranked 21st out of 30 teams - 10 points)

    Total points:  115 (due to error on Blue Jays slide the Phillies are actually ranked 15th overall)

    I was surprised to find the Phillies ranked this low given their recent success.  However, being in the same division as the Braves and the Mets is the main cause; their down years happened during those teams' great years.  However, the Phillies recently went to back-to-back World Series, winning one and are primed to be the NL's representative for years to come behind players like Roy Halladay, Chase Utley and Cliff Lee.  I would not be suprised at all to see several more World Series appearances and wins in the coming seasons. 

Number 15: the Chicago White sox

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    Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  11 (33 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  5 (25 points)

    World Series wins:3 (30 points)

    100+ win seasons:  1 (2 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  18 (18 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 36.7 years (ranked 15th out of 30 teams - 16 points)

    Total points:  124 (due to error on Blue Jays slide - the White Sox are actually ranked 14th overall)

    The White Sox finally broke their decades-long World Series winless streak in 2005.  With the recent additions of players like Adam Dunn, the White Sox should compete for years to come in the tough AL Central with the Twins and Tigers.  How much success they have in the coming seasons will depend on having good years from all their players and hoping to capitalize on "down years" from the Twins or Tigers.  I wouldn't be suprised to see the White Sox in the playoffs at least a couple times during the next decade.

Number 14: the Toronto Blue Jays

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    Dave Sandford/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  34

    First place finishes:  5 (15 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  2 (10 points)

    World Series wins:  2 (20 points)

    100+ win seasons:  0

    90 - 99 win seasons:  5 (5 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 17 years (ranked 7th out of 30 teams - 24 points)

    Total points:  74 (corrected due to error in spreadsheet used - the Blue Jays are actually ranked 18th overall)

    The only team in the top 17 of these rankings that has existed for less than 100 years.  Their greatest success came in the early 1990s when they won their two World Series titles.  Recently, they've had the bad luck of being in the same division as the Yankees and Red Sox and have traded away one of the best pitchers (if not the best) in the game in Roy Halladay.  However, in 2010 Jose Bautista showed he might just be the real deal and if some of the prospects they've received in trades pan out, they might surprise some people.  However, as I said before, being in the same division as the Yankees and the Red Sox means success in the future will be very hard to come by.

Number 13: the Baltimore Orioles

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    Rob Carr/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  10 (30 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  7 (35 points)

    World Series wins:  3 (30 points)

    100+ win seasons:  5 (10 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  14 (14 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 36.7 years (ranked 14th out of 30 teams - 17 points)

    Total points:  137

    The Orioles' greatest period of success came in the 1970s behind a great pitching staff led by Jim Palmer and outstanding defense by Brooks Robinson.  During the Ripken years, they also experienced some success.  However, in the late 1990s teams like the Yankees and Red Sox returned to prominence in the division, so the Orioles success has been hard to find since then.  Over the past couple of seasons, the Orioles haven't had much luck, but with young players like Nick Markakis and Adam Jones along with Buck Showalter now as the manager, the Orioles might just be able to find some success in the coming seasons.  I could see them doing what the Rays did over the last couple of years and surprise everyone by being able to hold their own against the Yankees and Red Sox in the AL East.

Number 12: the Minnesota Twins

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    J. Meric/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  14 (42 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series apperances:  6 (30 points)

    World Series wins:  3 (30 points)

    100+ win seasons:  1 (2 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  21 (21 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 36.7 years (ranked 16th out of 30 teams - 15 points)

    Total points:  140

    The Twins experienced success as the Washington Senators behind Walter Johnson and then again as the Twins behind Kirby Puckett.  Over the last decade or so, they have become perennial contenders behind young players such as Joe Mauer and Justin Morneau.  Being a "small market" team, it's unclear how they're constantly able to contend but they do.  I can see them contending for the next decade or so against the Tigers and White Sox in the AL Central and if they can somehow avoid playing the Yankees in October they might reach the World Series once again.

Number 11: the Detroit Tigers

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    Nick Laham/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  11 (33 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  10 (50 points)

    World Series wins:  4 (40 points)

    100+ win seasons:  5 (10 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  11 (11 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 27.5 years (ranked 13th out of 30 teams - 18 points)

    Total points:  163

    The Tigers seem to have success every couple of decades or so.  A couple seasons ago they were the worst team in the league and now behind players like Miguel Cabrera, Justin Verlander and Austin Jackson, they should compete well with the Twins and White Sox in the AL Central.  The amount of success they have in the coming years will depend on if Cabrera can get his off-the-field issues resolved, their young players pan out and the pitching staff remains healthy.

Number 10: the Chicago Cubs

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    Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  135

    First place finishes:  21 (63 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  10 (50 points)

    World Series wins:  2 (20 points)

    100+ win seasons:  5 (10 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  17 (17 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 67.5 years (ranked 22nd out of 30 teams - 9 points)

    Total points:  170

    We've finally reached the top 10 franchises.  Are you surprised to see the Cubs ranked this high?  I actually wasn't.  The Cubs were one of the most successful franchises in baseball's early history; then more than a century has passed without tasting the ultimate success.  As any Cubs fan will tell you, they're always "this close" to winning it all and "there's always next year".  Until the Cubs can unload some of their "dead weight" contracts like Alfonso Soriano and bring in some good young players, it's going to be hard for them to compete with teams like the Cardinals and the Reds in the NL Central.  Their best hope is that Albert Pujols becomes a free agent and is willing to sign with the Cubs.  If that happens, they might finally taste success again.

Number 9: the Pittsburgh Pirates

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    Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  129

    First place finishes:  16 (48 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  7 (35 points)

    World Series wins:  5 (50 points)

    100+ win seasons:  2 (4 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  25 (25 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 25.8 years (ranked 12th out of 30 teams - 19 points)

    Total points: 181

    I was very surprised to see the Pirates ranked this high.  Yes, they had success decades ago and I figured their futility over the last 20 years would have caused them to be ranked much lower.  However, until they get a new owner that is actually willing to spend money on actual on-the-field talent and keep any young players that do turn out to be good, they will never compete again.  If the Pirates actually even reach .500 in a season in the next decade I would be suprised.  Sorry Pirates fans but there's just no hope on the horizon.  All teams go through down periods but they usually can snap out of it for a season or two, but the Pirates show that if you refuse to bring in any talent, you cannot win in Major League Baseball.

Number 8: the Cincinnati Reds

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  129

    First place finishes:  16 (48 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  0

    World Series appearances:  9 (45 points)

    World Series wins:  5 (50 points)

    100+ win seasons:  4 (8 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons: 15 (15 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 25.8 years (ranked 11th out of 30 teams - 20 points)

    Total points:  186

    The Reds' greatest success came in the 1970s with the Big Red Machine and again in the early 1990s.  Now, behind players like Joey Votto and Arnoldis Chapman, they are experiencing success again.  The Reds should continue to experience this success for years to come and I wouldn't be surprised at all to see them in the World Series in the next couple of years.

Number 7: the Atlanta Braves

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    Rob Carr/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  135

    First place finishes:  28 (84 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  9 (45 points)

    World Series wins:  3 (30 points)

    100+ win seasons:  8 (16 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  16 (16 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 45 years (ranked 18th out of 30 teams - 13 points)

    Total points:  205

    The Braves best run came in the 1990s when they owned the National League; unfortunately that run only resulted in one World Series title.  Following the departure of players like Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine, the Braves experienced some down years but now behind young players like Jason Heyward, the Braves once again are contenders in the NL East.  I wouldn't be suprised at all to see the Braves once again being yearly participants in the playoffs and maybe even getting back to the World Series. 

Number 6: the Boston Red sox

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    J. Meric/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  14 (42 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  7 (7 points)

    World Series appearances:  11 (55 points)

    World Series wins:  7 (70 points)

    100+ win seasons:  3 (6 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  24 (24 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 15.7 years (ranked 6th out of 30 teams - 25 points)

    Total points:  229

    The Sox went close to a century without winning the World Series, then they had a historic comeback against the Yankees in 2004 and have since won the World Series twice.  With the recent additions of Adrian Gonzalez and Carl Crawford, the Red Sox are now the experts' pick to win the World Series.  As long as they can continue to compete with the Yankees for free agents, they should continue to be considered amongst the AL's best for years to come.  As a Yankee fan, this scares me.

Number 5: the Oakland Athletics

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    Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  23 (69 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  14 (70 points)

    World Series wins:  9 (90 points)

    100+ win seasons:  10 (20 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  18 (18 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 12.2 years (ranked 3rd out of 30 teams - 28 points)

    Total points:  296

    We finally reached the Top 5 franchises of all-time.

    The Athletics are one of the rare franchises that found success in every city they existed; whether it was Kansas City, Philadelphia or Oakland.  They found recent success behind the "MoneyBall" theory, but it only resulted in regular season success, not post-season success.  They have recently quietly rebuilt and are a lot of experts' sleeper pick to win the AL West.  I see success in their future; mainly because of how their team is built but also because the AL West is cyclical with each team having success for three or four years at a time.

Number 4: the San Franciso Giants

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    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  128

    First place finishes:  25 (75 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  18 (90 points)

    World Series wins:  6 (60 points)

    100+ win seasons:  7 (14 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  34 (34 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 23.3 years (ranked 9th out of 30 teams - 22 points)

    Total points:  296

    The Giants' greatest success came when they were in New York; that is until 2010.  In 2010, the Giants won the World Series and are considered among the favorites to win it again in 2011.  Behind the arms of Tim Lincecum and Brian Wilson and the bat of Buster Posey, the Giants are poised to continue to enjoy success for years to come.  Provided the Giants don't lose key stars to free agency, I wouldn't be surprised at all to seem them back in the World Series soon.

Number 3: the Los Angeles Dodgers

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    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  127

    First place finishes:  28 (84 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  2 (2 points)

    World Series appearances:  18 (90 points)

    World Series wins:  6 (60 points)

    100+ win seasons:  6 (12 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  29 (29 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 21.2 years (ranked 8th out of 30 teams - 23 points)

    Total points:  300

    The Dodgers have tasted the ultimate success in Brooklyn and Los Angeles and always seem to be in the fight for the NL West.  They have a good group of young players such as Matt Kemp and Andre Ethier.  However, unless the ownership of this team is figured out soon, it may have long term affects on this team.  If that is straightened out soon, they'll continue to contend but if it drags out and they can't make improvements to the team in free agency, they may find themselves falling behind teams like the Giants.

Number 2: the St. Louis Cardinals

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    Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

    Years in existence:  129

    First place finishes:  27 (81 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  1 (1 point)

    World Series appearances:  16 (80 points)

    World Series wins:  10 (100 points(

    100+ win seasons:  8 (16 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  24 (24 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 12.9 years (ranked 4th out of 30 teams - 27 points)

    Total points:  329

    Before I did this list, I figured the Cardinals would come in second so it's no surprise.  Ten World Series titles spread thoughout their history and with the possibility of more to come; provided they can resign Albert Pujols.  They have several good young players and pitchers, and if they could just stay healthy, they would be considered perennial contenders.  The Cardinals have what I consider the best fan base in all of baseball and some of the best owners and I fully expect them to contend year after year.

Number 1: the New York Yankees

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    Years in existence:  110

    First place finishes:  45 (135 points)

    Wild Card appearances:  4 (4 points)

    World Series appearances:  40 (200 points)

    World Series wins:  27 (270 points)

    100+ win seasons:  19 (38 points)

    90 - 99 win seasons:  39 (39 points)

    Average years between World Series wins:  Once every 4.1 years (ranked 1st out of 30 teams - 30 points)

    Total points:  716

    Was there every any doubt which team would be ranked number one?  Most World Series titles, most World Series appearances, most first place finishes, most 100+ win seasons, most 90-99 win seasons, fewest amount of years between World Series wins and second most Wild Card appearances. 

    The Yankees only truly "down" period came in the 1980s when they didn't win a single World Series, but still finished the decade with the most wins of any team in the 1980s. 

    Yes, the biggest advantage today is their checkbook and they willingly take advantage of it.  Sorry fans of other teams, there's just no way your team can ever surpass the Yankees as the best franchise in baseball history.

Final Analysis

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    So, were there any suprises?  Which team is higher than you thought they would be?  Any teams lower than you initially thought?

    Does it surprise you that the Yankees finished with almost 400 points more than the team that finished in second (who only finished with 326 points total)?  It did me; I knew they were clearly the best franchise in baseball history based on success but I thought it would only be 200 points or so separating the Yanks from the Cards, not 400.

    I was suprised the Red Sox didn't crack the top five and that the Dodgers barely edged out the Giants for number three.

    Please leave any comments below - tell me what you think about the system I used or how you feel about the rankings.