MLB All-Stars at Each Position by the Letter 'B'

Cliff Eastham@RedsToTheBoneSenior Writer IIApril 3, 2011

MLB All-Stars at Each Position by the Letter 'B'

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    This is the second article in a twenty-some volume series selecting players at each position by the beginning letter of their last name. Some letters such as I, O, Q, U, Y and Z will probably not field a time. I haven’t researched them yet so I can’t say for sure. It is a fun list, a conversation starter and I hope I can get it finished. I was actually inspired to do this list from author Sue Grafton’s Mystery Alphabet Series.

    I decided to us a modified 1961 Topps look for this particular letter. I hope you enjoy it.

Catcher: Yogi Berra

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    C: Yogi Berra

    Some people tend to think that Johnny Bench is the best catcher ever. I, on the other hand, the List-master, am telling you otherwise. Keep in mind I am a Featured Columnist for the Reds, which no doubt adds further credence to my selections.  Although their career statistics are very comparable, he leads Bench in most offensive categories, except HR.

    Berra won three MVP awards, was on 15 consecutive All-Star squads. He leads the Milky Way in World Series rings with 10. His best season was 1950 when he batted .322, hit 28 HR, 124 RBI, 192 H, and scored 116 runs. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    7555

    1175

    2150

    358

    1430

    .285

    .348

    125

First Base: Ernie Banks

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    1B: Ernie Banks

    Mr. Cub could have been selected here at 1B or at SS. He was a two-time National League MVP and was selected to 11 All-Star teams. He hit over 40 HR five times and drove in over 100 runs eight times. He won two HR crowns and two RBI titles in his 19 seasons all with the Cubs.

    He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    9421

    1305

    2583

    512

    1636

    .274

    .330

    122

Second Base: Craig Biggio

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    2B: Craig Biggio

    Craig Biggio did something that is clearly unusual in this time period. He played his entire 20-year career with the Houston Astros. He was a seven-time All-Star, won four Gold Glove Awards along with five Silver Slugger Awards. He led the National League in doubles three times, in runs scored twice and in steals once. His best season was ’97 when he batted .309, hit 22 HR and had 81 RBI, with 191 H and 146 R. In his final campaign of 2007, Biggio collected his 3,000 hit, which is a strong barometer in his quest for the Hall of Fame. He is 13th on the all-time list with 1844 runs scored.

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    10876

    1844

    3060

    291

    1175

    .281

    .363

    111

Third Base: Wade Boggs

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    3B: Wade Boggs

    I had a very difficult time here deciding between Wade Boggs and George Brett. Brett obviously had more power, but Boggs had a very definite advantage in BA and OBP. Boggs won five batting titles with a high of .368 in 1985. He led the American League in doubles twice, runs twice and hits once. He collected over 200 base hits in seven consecutive seasons. He also led the league in OPS+ in 1987 with 173. Boggs batted over .300 during 15 of his 18 MLB seasons. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    9180

    1513

    3010

    118

    1014

    .328

    .415

    130

Shortstop: Lou Boudreau

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    SS: Lou Boudreau

    Lou Boudreau was the Most Valuable Player in 1848 in the American League. He batted .355 with 18 HR, 106 RBI, 199 H and 116 R. His OBP that year was .453. He was on seven All-Star teams and won the batting title in 1944 with .327. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1970.

     

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    6029

    861

    1779

    68

    789

    .295

    .380

    120

Left Field: Barry Bonds

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    LF: Barry Bonds

    I am not going to penalize players who may or may not have dabbled in steroids or gambling. I had a board meeting last night with Caesar Cliffius, and we decided that since we are not a judge or jury, the records must speak for themselves.  I say all of this as an introduction for my Left Fielder, Barry Bonds. Like him, hate him or feel sorry for him, the man could flat out hit, before and after the alleged infractions.

    My God, where do I start? He won a MLB record of seven Most Valuable Player awards, was on 14 All-Star teams, won eight Gold Glove Awards and 12 Silver Slugger Awards. Obviously his best season was 2001 when he broke the MLB HR record for good at 73. He also added 137 RBI and a .328 average and collected a league leading 177 base on balls. He is the career leader in HR with 762, in BB with 2558 and intentional walks with 688. He is third in career OPS+ behind Babe Ruth and Ted Williams.

    At press time, Bonds is being tried by a jury of his peers for perjury.

     

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    9847

    2227

    2935

    762

    1996

    .298

    .444

    181

Center Field: Lou Brock

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    CF: Lou Brock

    Lou Brock was predominately a Left Fielder but so was Bonds, and so also is my right fielder. What is a man supposed to do? Brock was on six All-Star teams and was a base stealing extraordinaire. He set a modern day record of 118 in 1974, which would later be eclipsed by Rickey Henderson. He led the National League in stolen bases eight times, averaging 58 over 162 game seasons. He collected over 200 H four times and led the league in R twice. He batted over .300 eight times. He is one of only three (I think) players to hit a HR to dead center in the Polo Grounds, which was close to 500 feet from home plate. Brock was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

     

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    10332

    1610

    3023

    149

    900

    .293

    .343

    109

Right Field: Jesse Burkett

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    RF: Jesse Burkett

    Jesse Burkett, one of the Mayflower Boys, is one of the best players you probably never heard of.  He won three batting titles, hit over .400 twice, and managed over 200 H six times. Burkett led the league in H on three occasions. He is currently 18th on the All-Time list with a .338 career avg. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame by the “Old Timers Committee” in 1946.

     

     

    AT  BAT

    RUNS

    HITS

    HR

    RBI

    AVG

    OBP

    OPS+

    8426

    1720

    2850

    75

    952

    .338

    .415

    140

Pitcher: Mordecai Brown

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    P: Mordecai Brown

    Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown had six consecutive 20-win seasons, leading the league in 1909 with 27. He has the sixth lowest career ERA in history at 2.06. His ERA was below 2.00 six times, leading the league in 1906 at 1.04, also leading the league with 9 SHO. His career WHIP of 1.066 puts him at No. 9 on the MLB list. It was below 1.000 on five occasions. Brown was inducted into the Hall of Fame by the “Old Timers Committee” in 1949.

     

     

    INNINGS

    W-L

    ERA

    WHIP

    SHUTOUTS

    STRIKEOUTS

    CG

    ERA+

    3172

    239-130

    2.06

    1.066

    55

    1375

    332

    139

     

    Here are the links to my other pieces in this series:

    MLB All-Stars at each position by the letter “A”