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Tom Brady and the 25 Best NFL Draft Picks of the Last Decade

Ryan BoserCorrespondent IIMarch 27, 2011

Tom Brady and the 25 Best NFL Draft Picks of the Last Decade

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    "We feel very strongly that our best policy is to draft the best player. This isn't fantasy football." -Ted Thompson, Green Bay Packers GM

    There have been 2,552 players drafted in the last decade (2001-2010), most of whom we've never heard from again. As you can imagine, paring that list down to the 25 best selections was a daunting task, but someone had to do it. 

    Why? Because we love lists. Because we're bored with the CBA. Because the draft is fast approaching, and I'm a glutton for punishment.

    How? That's the $9 billion question. How does one accurately compare the value of a seventh-round sleeper to that of a No. 1 pick?

    Using my best discretion, I've rated draft picks under two simple criteria, each with its own 50-point scale:

    1) Caliber of Player (1-50)  
    The first rating is a basic measure of overall talent and production. With regard to younger players, potential and future expectations were taken into consideration. 

    2) Degree of Difficulty (1-50)
    The second rating is a measure of ingenuity. While turning up stars becomes more difficult as a draft progresses, organizational and situational x-factors also weighed into this rating.

Tom Brady, QB: 100 / Patriots, 2000 / Round 6, Pick 199

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    Let's test drive this theorem with Tom Brady, arguably the best draft pick ever made. 

    Caliber of Player: 50
    As one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time, Brady is a lock for the perfect "50" rating.

    Degree of Difficulty: 50
    Uncovered late in the sixth round of the 2000 draft, the Patriots saw something in the mediocre Michigan prospect that nobody else did. Brady defines "diamond in the rough" and scores another obvious "50."

    Fittingly, the Patriots' selection of Brady gets the rarefied "100" rating.

    After several rounds of preliminary filtering, I've run the most worthy candidates through this experiment. What follows are my 25 best draft picks of the last decade (2001-2010). We're talking about the 99th percentile here, folks.

    And we're on the clock... 

25. Matt Cassel, QB: 89 / Patriots, 2005 / Round 7, Pick 230

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    Caliber of Player: 39
    Ironically, the first guy on the list happens to be another long-shot New England quarterback. Cassel filled in admirably when Tom Brady went down in 2008—his 3,693 yards were good for eighth in the league. He was traded to the Chiefs prior to the 2009 season, and after a slow start, his arrow is pointing up in Kansas City. He posted a 27:7 touchdown to interception ratio last season, leading the Chiefs to an unlikely AFC West championship. In another twist of fate, Cassel was Tom Brady's replacement in January's Pro Bowl.

    Degree of Difficulty: 50
    It's hard enough to uncover a Pro Bowl quarterback in the seventh round, but this time, the Patriots really outdid themselves. Stuck behind Heisman winners Carson Palmer and Matt Leinart at USC, Cassel never started a college game. However, the Patriots saw something in him at USC's Pro Day and made Cassel one of the better draft day success stories of the decade.

24. Justin Tuck, DE: 89 / Giants, 2005 / Round 3, Pick 74

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    Caliber of Player: 46
    Tuck's freakish raw athleticism was on full display in Super Bowl XLII. He registered two sacks and a forced fumble, pressured Tom Brady into mediocrity and was snubbed for MVP honors. A two-time All Pro, Tuck plays with extreme tenacity against both the run and pass. 

    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    Coming out of Notre Dame, Tuck was a first-round prospect who plummeted in the draft, as teams were wary of his slow recovery from a torn ACL. The Giants' risk was rewarded with an outstanding replacement for Michael Strahan.

23. Jamaal Charles, RB: 89 / Chiefs, 2008 / Round 3, Pick 73

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    Caliber of Player: 46
    A Chris Johnson clone, Charles is teetering on the brink of superstardom. Perhaps the only thing holding him back is head coach Todd Haley—Charles' 1,467 yards ranked second in the league last season, despite his 230 attempts ranking just 14th. Yeah, that's a 6.4-yard average. Over a full season. Charles is equally lethal in the passing game, and while you may think I'm jumping the gun on this rating, I believe there's a strong possibility that I'm being too conservative.

    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    The former Longhorn was the ninth running back drafted in an incredibly strong 2008 rookie crop that included Chris Johnson, Ray Rice, Darren McFadden, Matt Forte, Jonathan Stewart, Rashard Mendenhall, Felix Jones and Ryan Torain.

    The Chiefs got more bang for their buck than anyone.

22. Clay Matthews, LB: 89 / Packers, 2009 / Round 1, Pick 26

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    Caliber of Player: 48
    What hasn't Clay Matthews done in two years? After notching 10 sacks as a rookie in 2009, he was robbed of Defensive Player of the Year honors last season when he compiled 13.5 sacks, two forced fumbles, an interception and a touchdown. Moreover, his jarring hit on Rashard Mendenhall was the turning point in last season's Super Bowl.

    Degree of Difficulty: 41
    How can a first-round pick be that difficult? 

    When you're dealing with the devil.

    Ted Thompson sent the Patriots his second-round pick (41) and his two thirds (73 & 83) to move back into the first round (the Packers also received a fifth-rounder) to select Matthews. Do you think Bill Belichick would like to have that one back?

21. Brandon Marshall, WR: 90 / Broncos, 2006 / Round 4, Pick 119

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    Caliber of Player: 45
    We're still waiting for the 27-year-old Marshall to mature, but there's no denying his production. He topped 100 catches and 1,100 yards for three consecutive seasons before joining Miami last year. Despite missing two games in 2010, he still managed 86 catches and 1,014 yards without the presence of an NFL quarterback. Marshall's a big bodied receiver who has the ability to fight for the ball in traffic.

    Degree of Difficulty: 45
    Coming out of Central Florida, Marshall was the 14th WR taken in the 2006 draft, behind such notable names as Travis Wilson, Willie Reid and Cory Rodgers. 

    I've never heard of them either.

20. Carl Nicks, G: 90 / Saints, 2008 / Round 5, Pick 154

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    Caliber of Player: 43
    Drafted out of Nebraska as a left tackle prospect, Nicks has transitioned into one of the best left guards in the NFL. At 6'5", 343 lbs., he knows how to throw his weight around, regularly dominating his opponents with brute strength.

    Degree of Difficulty: 47
    Nicks was viewed as a very raw first-round prospect whose character/legal issues were so troubling that he was banned from Nebraska's Pro Day. The Saints felt he was worth the risk, and outside of his infamous "I'm going to mother-****ing Disneyland!" gem, Nicks has focused his energies on trench domination.

19. Adrian Wilson, S: 90 / Cardinals, 2001 / Round 3, Pick 64

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    Caliber of Player: 47
    Long overshadowed by Troy Polamalu and Ed Reed, Wilson has quietly been one of the best safeties in the league over the past six seasons. A four-time Pro Bowler, he became just the 10th player in league history to join the exclusive 20/20 (sacks/interceptions) Club in 2009. He's a big, well-rounded safety without any discernible weaknesses.

    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    In 2001, Arizona drafted strong safety Michael Stone in the second round. Fortunately, they drafted Wilson out of N.C. State just 10 picks later. Stone never recorded a sack or an interception and started just three games in his six-year NFL career.

18. Steve Smith, WR: 90 / Panthers, 2001 / Round 3, Pick 74

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    Caliber of Player: 47
    Pound-for-pound, Smith might be the toughest player of the last decade. At just 5'9", 185 lbs., he's defied the odds his entire career, consistently beating double and triple teams without ever playing with a true topflight quarterback. In 2005, Smith won the "Triple Crown" of receiving, leading the NFL with 1,563 yards, 103 receptions and 12 touchdowns.

    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    Smith had an outstanding career at Utah, but it wasn't until the Blue-Gray All-Star game that scouts took notice. The 10 receivers drafted ahead of Smith included such names as David Terrell, Koren Robinson, Rod Gardner, Freddie Mitchell, Quincy Morgan, Robert Ferguson and Chris Chambers.

    Oops.

17. Lance Briggs, LB: 90 / Bears, 2003 / Round 3, Pick 68

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    Caliber of Player: 47
    With Brian Urlacher receiving all the accolades, Lance Briggs has flown under the radar for most of his impressive career. A six-time Pro Bowler and three-time All Pro, Briggs has averaged 112 tackles/season over the last seven years. He's the epitome of a lunch-pail linebacker.

    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    Turning up Briggs' production in the third round was a heist. Among others, linebackers Terry Pierce, Chaun Thompson, Victor Hobson, Alonzo Jackson and Atwan Peek all heard their names called before Briggs. Those five have combined for 731 career tackles, 133 less than Briggs alone.

16. Brian Westbrook, RB: 90 / Eagles, 2002 / Round 3, Pick 91

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    Caliber of Player: 47
    Westbrook is one of the most prolific dual-threat running backs of the last decade. In a five-year span from 2004-2008, he averaged 1,621 combination yards and 11 touchdowns despite playing in just 13.8 games per season due to nagging injuries.

    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    Westbrook had a fantastic career at 1-AA Villanova, but his injury history (knee) and his smallish demeanor left scouts leery. He'd go on to fit Andy Reid's offense like a glove.

15. Nnamdi Asomugha, CB: 90 / Raiders, 2003 / Round 1, Pick 31

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    Caliber of Player: 50
    How good is Asomugha? He has just three interceptions in the last four seasons...quarterbacks don't even try. He completely shuts down one side of the field—he's faced just 27 pass attempts in each of the last two seasons, making him the most un-targeted cornerback in the league by a wide margin. Of the 27 attempts he faced last year, he allowed just 10 receptions and no touchdowns. He's a four-time All Pro whose been named to the Fox Sports and USA Today All-Decade teams.

    Degree of Difficulty: 40
    Primarily a safety at the University of California, Asomugha was considered a bit of a reach as a first rounder. He was selected exactly one pick after the AFC West rival San Diego Chargers drafted cornerback Sammy Davis. Eight years later, Asomugha's done the impossible—he's made Al Davis look brilliant.

14. Darelle Revis, CB: 91 / Jets, 2007 / Round 1, Pick 14

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    Caliber of Player: 50
    "Revis Island" is where opposing receivers go to die lonely, hungry deaths. The debate for the league's best cover corner begins and ends with Revis and Asomugha. Revis' 2009 season is considered by many to be the best ever by a cornerback. It's frightening to consider how dominant he is at just 25 years old.

    Degree of Difficulty: 40
    While Revis was a first-rounder, he didn't exactly fall into New York's lap. The Jets identified Revis as their guy, and they sent their first (25), second (59), and fifth round (164) selections to Carolina for a sixth rounder, and the right to move up to 14. They plucked the Pittsburgh junior one spot ahead of his hometown Steelers.

13. Jason Witten, TE: 91 / Cowboys, 2003 / Round 3, Pick 69

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    Caliber of Player: 48
    In many ways, Witten is the perfect tight end. He's the total package, and his combination of route-running, pass catching, blocking and grit is even more impressive when you consider that he hasn't missed a game in over seven seasons (114 games, to be exact). The seven-time Pro Bowler has averaged 91 catches and 1,032 yards the past four years.

    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    A third-rounder, the Tennessee product saw fellow tight ends Bennie Joppru, L.J. Smith and Teyo Johnson all drafted in the second. Interestingly, Witten was selected one spot behind Lance Briggs, my 17th-best draft pick of the decade.

12. Asante Samuel, CB: 92 / Patriots, 2003 / Round 4, Pick 120

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    Caliber of Player: 47
    Baiting quarterbacks into mistakes has become Samuel's trademark. The four-time Pro Bowler won two Super Bowls with the Patriots before the Eagles snatched him just hours into the 2008 free-agency signing period. Still going strong at 30 years old, Samuel led the NFC with seven interceptions last season.

    Degree of Difficulty: 45
    The Patriots turned up a gem in the Central Florida standout. Samuel's 42 career interceptions are more than the combined total (36) of the six cornerbacks drafted before him in the third and fourth rounds (Ricky Manning, Donald Strickland, Julian Battle, Dennis Weathersby, DeJuan Groce and Terrence McGee).

11. Trent Cole, DE: 92 / Eagles, 2005 / Round 5, Pick 146

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    Caliber of Player: 45
    One of the most underrated players in the league, Cole is a complete defensive end. Not only does he excel in run support, but over the past four seasons, he's racked up 44 sacks and nine forced fumbles while facing regular double-teams. For reference, his 44 sacks since 2007 are more than Mario Williams (43.5), Julius Peppers (35.5) and Dwight Freeney (37.5).

    Degree of Difficulty: 47
    It didn't take the Eagles long to realize they'd found something special in the fifth-rounder out of Cincinnati. Selected with a pick that was acquired from Washington (for James Thrash), Cole's production increased steadily over his first three seasons. A six-year veteran, the 28-year-old Cole has turned into a draft day home run.

10. Michael Turner, RB: 92 / Chargers, 2005 / Round 5, Pick 154

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    Caliber of Player: 45
    Turner is a human bowling ball with surprising speed. After toiling in LaDainian Tomlinson's shadow for his first four seasons, "The Burner" finally got his shot in Atlanta. Since joining the Falcons in 2008, he's scored 39 touchdowns in 43 games and been named to two Pro Bowls.

    Degree of Difficulty: 47
    While the Chargers never got to reap the benefits, they still deserve credit for uncovering the Northern Illinois Huskie. Turner's a perfect example of how difficult the NFL draft really is—he was selected over 120 picks later than first-rounders Chris Perry and Kevin Jones.

9. Cortland Finnegan, CB: 93 / Titans, 2006 / Round 7, Pick 215

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    Caliber of Player: 43
    Fundamentally sound and full of swagger, Finnegan plays much bigger than his 5'10", 188lb.-frame. Whether you consider him dirty or scrappy, you can't deny his fortitude. An undersized seventh-rounder out of Samford with a massive chip on his shoulder, the 2008 All Pro has long refused to back down from his division rival, the 6'3", 225 lb.-creature known as Andre Johnson. 

    Degree of Difficulty: 50
    Simply put, cornerbacks of Finnegan's caliber are not supposed to emerge from the seventh round. While most didn't even expect Finnegan to be drafted, Tennessee wisely made him the 19th cornerback off the board.

8. Peyton Hillis, RB: 93 / Broncos, 2008 / Round 7, Pick 227

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    Caliber of Player: 43
    Cult hero Peyton Hillis, also known as the "Albino Rhino," first began to show flashes of his potential late in his 2008 rookie season when Denver's backfield was decimated with injuries. However, Josh McDaniels replaced Mike Shanahan in 2009, and he didn't view Hillis as a viable running back option for his system. In a move Broncos fans will never forgive, McDaniels shipped Hillis to Cleveland for Brady Quinn prior to the 2010 season. In his first year with the Browns, the incredibly versatile Hillis was unleashed to the tune of 1,654 combination yards and 13 touchdowns.

    Degree of Difficulty: 50
    Primarily a lead blocker for Darren McFadden and Felix Jones at Arkansas, Hillis played fullback, running back, wide receiver, tight end, kick returner and punt returner for the Razorbacks. Most viewed him as a "tweener"—not a true fullback or running back. However, Hillis has proven that he doesn't need a positional label. He's a "football player" in the purest form.

7. Robert Mathis, DE: 93 / Colts, 2003 / Round 5, Pick 138

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    Caliber of Player: 46
    Much like Trent Cole, Mathis has never seemed to receive the recognition he deserves. Shockingly, he's out sacked high-profile teammate Dwight Freeney in five of the past six seasons. In total, Mathis has collected 74 sacks in his eight-year career, he's won a Super Bowl and he's been named to three Pro Bowls.

    Degree of Difficulty: 47
    Mathis didn't receive much fanfare coming out of 1-AA Alabama A&M, and at 6'2", 235 lbs., he projected somewhere between outside linebacker and defensive end. The Colts decided they'd draft him as a pass-rushing specialist and worry the details later.

     


6. Jahri Evans, G: 93 / Saints, 2006 / Round 4, Pick 108

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    Caliber of Player: 47
    The secret's out—Jahri Evans might be the best guard in the NFL. At the very least, he combines with teammate Carl Nicks to give the Saints the league's top guard tandem. The 27-year-old is coming off his second consecutive All Pro season.

    Degree of Difficulty: 46
    Evans played his college ball at tiny D-II Bloomsburg University in Pennsylvania, making him a 318 lb.-needle in a haystack. He was seen as a project—a left tackle that would someday transition to guard. Remarkably, Evans has started every game in his five-year career with the Saints.

5. Jared Allen, DE: 94 / Chiefs, 2004 / Round 4, Pick 126

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    Caliber of Player: 48
    Allen's quickness and relentless motor have made him one of the NFL's best edge rushers since his 2004 rookie season. The three-time All Pro has tallied 83 sacks in his seven-year career, and he's averaged 14 per season over the last four. 

    Degree of Difficulty: 46
    A product of Division 1-AA Idaho State, Allen was projected as a late-round prospect with limited upside. The Chiefs knew better. Meanwhile, in search of defensive end help, the Vikings ironically selected Kenechi Udeze in the first round and Darrion Scott in the third. They'd finally get the right guy four years later via trade.

4. Marques Colston, WR: 94 / Saints, 2006 / Round 7, Pick 252

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    Caliber of Player: 44
    Colston didn't waste any time putting his stamp on the NFL—he set a league record with 168 catches in his first two seasons. At 6'4", 225 lbs., size is Colston's greatest asset, and he knows how to use it. In 72 career games, he's scored 40 times and averaged 71 yards per game as Drew Brees' favorite target.

    Degree of Difficulty: 50
    Colston is the lowest selection on this entire list. Drafted 252nd out of 1-AA Hofstra, he was picked exactly 250 spots behind Reggie Bush. In fact, he was just four spots away from going undrafted all together.

3. Aaron Rodgers, QB: 95 / Packers, 2005 / Round 1, Pick 24

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    Caliber of Player: 50
    Is there a brighter star in the league right now than Aaron Rodgers? Over the past three seasons, the Super Bowl MVP has averaged 4,131 yards, 29 touchdown passes and four touchdown runs.

    Degree of Difficulty: 45
    On the surface, Rodgers was a blue chipper who fell right into Green Bay's lap. As we know all too well, it wasn't that simple. As 2004 division champions, the Packers were built to "win now." Moreover, the legendary Brett Favre was coming off a 4,088-yard, 30-touchdown season. However, new GM Ted Thompson felt that Rodgers was too good to pass up.

    With amazing foresight, Thompson resisted the temptation to add an immediate contributor and drafted Favre's eventual replacement. The move ultimately alienated the face of the franchise, as well as a large portion of the fanbase. Six years later, Rodgers has already equalled Favre's Super Bowl total, and the Packers find themselves in position to build a dynasty around their 27-year-old quarterback.

2. Jay Ratliff, DT: 96 / Cowboys, 2005 / Round 7, Pick 224

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    Caliber of Player: 46
    Ratliff has been a disruptive force in the middle of the Cowboys' 3-4 defense for three straight Pro Bowl seasons. Undersized (303 lbs.) for a nose tackle, his energy and tenacity are off the charts.

    Degree of Difficulty: 50
    Ratliff played both tight end and defensive end at Auburn before ultimately landing at defensive tackle. We don't hear much about him being a draft day steal, because unlike fellow seventh-round sensation Marques Colston, he didn't come flying out of the gates. However, he's blossomed into one of the best defensive linemen in the league.

1. Mario Williams, DE: 97 / Texans, 2006 / Round 1, Pick 1

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    Caliber of Player: 47
    The 6'6", 295-lb. Williams has been of the best all-around defensive ends in the league the past four seasons. His jaw-dropping combination of size/speed/skill is equally destructive against both the run and the pass. Still just 26 years old, Williams' upside is truly unlimited.

    Degree of Difficulty: 50
    It was supposed to be the worst draft pick in NFL history. In fact, drafting Williams No. 1 overall, instead of the next Gale Sayers (Reggie Bush) or the hometown hero (Vince Young), was so appalling that GM Charlie Casserly was essentially run out of Houston.

    In hindsight, he was the only person in America who saw things clearly.

    Five years later, Bush is a glorified third-down back, Young is on the verge of washing out and Williams is one of the league's premier defenders.

Just Missed: 26-35

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    26. Elvis Dumervil, LB/DE: 89
    Broncos, 2006 / Round 4, Pick 126
    Caliber of Player: 44
    Degree of Difficulty: 45
    Note: The NFL's 2009 sack champion will look to return with a vengeance after missing all of 2010 with a torn pectoral muscle. 

    27. Chris Johnson, RB: 89
    Titans, 2008 / Round 1, Pick 24
    Caliber of Player: 49
    Degree of Difficulty: 40
    Note: As the fifth running back selected in the 2008 draft, Johnson set the NFL record with 2,509 yards from scrimmage in 2009.

    28. Drew Brees, QB: 89
    Chargers, 2001 / Round 2, Pick 32
    Caliber of Player: 50
    Degree of Difficulty: 39
    Note: Doubts about Brees' size and arm strength caused him to slip into the second round. He's a five-time Pro Bowler, a three-time All Pro, a Super Bowl MVP, an ambassador of the game and an icon that transcends football in New Orleans.

    29. Mike Williams, WR: 89
    Buccaneers, 2010 / Round 4, Pick 101
    Caliber of Player: 44
    Degree of Difficulty: 45
    Note: Plagued by character concerns, Williams developed an outstanding chemistry in his first year with Josh Freeman.

    30. Darnell Dockett, DT: 88
    Cardinals, 2004 / Round 3, Pick 64
    Caliber of Player: 45
    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    Note: A three-time Pro Bowler and one of the league's top defensive tackles. 

    31. Maurice Jones-Drew, RB: 88
    Jaguars, 2006 / Round 2, Pick 60
    Caliber of Player: 46
    Degree of Difficulty: 42
    Note: A dual-threat back and a goal line monster, MoJo has scored 63 touchdowns in 77 career games.

    32. LaDainian Tomlinson, RB: 88
    Chargers, 2001 / Round 1, Pick 5
    Caliber of Player: 50
    Degree of Difficulty: 38
    Note: "We'd hate to become the Portland Trail Blazers of the NFL." - Chargers' Head Coach Mike Riley, comparing the Chargers passing on Michael Vick to Portland passing on Michael Jordan (for Sam Bowie).

    33. DeSean Jackson, WR: 88
    Eagles, 2008 / Round 2, Pick 49
    Caliber of Player: 45
    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    Note: Supposedly too small, Jackson was the seventh wide receiver drafted in the second round. As a wide receiver/return man, he's become one of the league's true game breakers. 

    34. Frank Gore, RB: 88
    49ers, 2005 / Round 3, Pick 65
    Caliber of Player: 45
    Degree of Difficulty: 43
    Note: The two-time Pro Bowler is one of the league's best all-around backs. 

    35. Devin McCourty, CB: 87
    Patriots, 2010 / Round 1, Pick 27
    Caliber of Player: 46
    Degree of Difficulty: 41
    Note: The third cornerback taken in last year's draft, McCourty made seven interceptions in his Pro Bowl rookie season. 



Discuss

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    Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images

    This is not a perfect science. While I approached the experiment with complete impartiality, at the end of the day, we're still talking about the sum of two subjective ratings. There's clearly some wiggle room—that's the beauty of these kinds of exercises. There is no right answer.

    With that said, let's hear your thoughts. Who did I miss? Who did I overrate?

    I look forward to the discussion!

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