Michael Vick Is in, Sal Alosi Out

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Michael Vick Is in, Sal Alosi Out
Al Bello/Getty Images

Okay, let me explain. I am not a Michael Vick fan, nor am I a Philadelphia Eagles fan. I am not a New York Jets fan. I just have a couple of questions I feel should be answered.

First, let's talk some Vick. We live in a country where people are given the right of due process. At least that's what they say, unless you talk to a sports fan. For months now I have had the displeasure of reading outcries and whining about Vick and his crimes against society. Okay. Enough. We get it.

The man was cruel, committed a crime and went to prison for his crimes.

He has paid his debt to society, now get over it. The one thing I hate about sports is there are more whiners than in the sandbox growing up as a child. It doesn't matter if the man paid his debt and is participating in various rehabilitation programs, people will still complain. Well it's my turn. Shut up. 

Now, with that out of the way let's talk football. In the Eagles' 34-24 win over the Houston Texans Thursday there were instances where Vick was hit late and out of bounds. There also were times when his face mask was grasped in tackles. When asked, Eagles Head Coach Andy Reid was a bit upset about the issue.

"To be honest with you it does,” Reid said. “I’m seeing the same things you’re seeing. He does run. But he’s still a quarterback and there has to be—you can’t treat him like he’s a running back there.” 

The NFL officials didn't even so much as throw a flag for the late hit. In my opinion, in which most could agree, if that late hit was on a guy named Tom Brady or Peyton Manning you bet there would have been a flag thrown. Perhaps even an ejection (that could be a bit over the top). 

Frame-by-frame replays caught Vick’s foot on the sideline as he was hit, but it was close and no penalty ensued. Of course, the man responsible, Anthony Spencer, wasn't going to argue with the call.

Now let's shift gears here a bit and talk about Sal Alosi of the New York Jets. Ohhhhh Sal. Here's a strength and conditioning coach. Oddly, this man had been ordering trainers to line up on sidelines (behind the white line) all season long, according to teammates. A lot of teams do it and if you just use your eyeballs you can see it. However, nobody breaks character and puts his knee out. That was just stupid. 

On a kick return, Nolan Carroll, a gunner for the Miami Dolphins' special teams unit, ran out of bounds (why I will never know because he is automatically out of the play) and Alosi decided that, as Carroll was running down these sidelines, he would stick his knee out. I do not condone this for a second mind you, but refs, the NFL and fans were all over this action. 

But wait a minute. In the Houston Texans versus Philadelphia Eagles game prior to that, Vick was hit out of bounds, but nothing ensued. What is the NFL trying to tell us here? 

Let's recap: Vick being treated like a running back gets blasted out of bounds. Spencer gets no penalty because it was "close." Got it.

Nolan Carroll goes out of bounds and gets tripped by Alosi (again a stupid thought in his head) and suddenly Carroll is a part of the play? I guess? I guess I got that down.

So Alosi is now suspended indefinitely and may lose his job. A just punishment. Now let's point out the NFL's out of bound rules shall we?

  • The NFL requires that the sidelines of its fields be rimmed by a white border six feet wide. This territory is out of bounds, meaning that when a player in possession of the ball allows any part of his body, uniform or equipment to touch it, the play is over and the ball is marked where the player left the field of play and went out of bounds. The area that is in back of the end zone, which is 10-yards deep on both ends of the field, is also out of bounds. This comes into play in instances involving receptions, fumbles and kicks.
  •  

    That was a description.  Now let us begin looking at time frame:

  • When a player goes out of bounds with the football the clock is only stopped during the final two minutes of each half in the NFL. This was not always the case, but the rule was implemented to speed up the game. The referee often has to make tough decisions as to whether a player was down legally before making it to the sidelines or if he actually got there before being tackled.

  • My question is, if we review the living hell out of this media frenzied play, why can't the NFL review the very issue that Vick is having being sent to Timbucktoo after stepping out of bounds? Shouldn't it be treated with some of the same regard?  Isn't this a safety issue?

    I thought the NFL was taking drastic steps to protect NFL quarterbacks? Not Vick, he's a dog killer. Even though a blind eye on the television set wasn't on the field and clearly saw his foot was on the white. 

    So Alosi is now apologizing for his actions. Of course he is. He broke professionalism over something stupid. In a press conference here is Alosi apologizing:

    "I made a mistake that showed a total lapse in judgment. My conduct was inexcusable and unsportsmanlike and does not reflect what this organization stands for," Alosi said in a statement. "I accept responsibility for my actions as well as any punishment that follows."

    Right. You're sorry now. You're losing your job. Now somebody needs to lose their job over the Vick bashing and turning a blind eye without even a review, in spite of Reid almost losing his mustache over the charade.

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