Fantasy Football Advice: Are Your Early Losses Really Longterm Gains?

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Fantasy Football Advice: Are Your Early Losses Really Longterm Gains?
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There are a few familiar issues that always come traipsing along in the regular fantasy season that do nothing more than crap in our Monday morning Wheaties.

There is the all-too-familiar matchup where your star running back—who was supposed to dominate that week—was just abruptly shut down by the 29th ranked rushing defense.

Then there’s always the popular starting quarterback debacle where your ace in the hole throws for less than 200 yards and has a negative in the TD/INT ratio. You all know this one, that innocuous week where Dan Carpenter scores more points than Drew Brees.

OK, that may be a bit extreme, but you all know what I am talking about.

But what about those less heard moments in fantasy lore where injuries not only mess with your starting lineup, but are exacerbated by a waiver wire that is more desolate than the Atacama Desert?

Well sir, you’re looking at one of those guys, going through one of those things.

A few days ago, I learned that I lost CB Leigh Bodden - NE for the remainder of the year with a torn rotator cuff. I immediately thought that it was too early in the morning for this, and due to the type of injury and my own morning belligerence, I initially thought I was reading an MLB injury update.

Then, reality set in.

Now don’t get me wrong. I understand that a CB doesn’t usually hold a ton of value in an IDP leagues, and they are widely viewed as the most unpredictable, schizophrenic position on the roster. However, I was really high on this guy as you can tell by reading this, and I really don’t like anything messing with my system.

And to boot, I only have rookie Kyle Wilson - Jets as a backup, who I am also high on.

So of course, like a good little manager, I rush to the waiver wire to see who is out there and see nothing but despair—I also could’ve sworn I heard a tumbleweed roll passed me, but I can’t be sure.

Here is the first five players… the highest ranked players available.

  • Josh Wilson now with the Baltimore Ravens, but a situational CB at best. 
  • Will James of San Fran who is out four to six weeks at least.
  • Eric Wright, who is the best corner in Cleveland. Need I say more?
  • Nick freaking Harper??? Really?
  • And last, but not least, Aqib Talib of Tampa. 

Now at first sight, one would say grab Talib, right?

It may just wind up being the only decision I have, since the few CBs that are out there aren’t going to come close to what Talib could do (he averaged 5.7 points a game last year).

But the other beauty of preseason is the very beast that interferes with my grand design: Injury.

There are still a couple of corners out there that could wind up having a significant impact in the 2010 season, but their risk factor is a big concern.

Quentin Jammer – SD is dealing with a minor knee injury. He has the potential to be a solid play in a San Diego defense that is always opportunistic, but can he stay healthy for 16 games?

Marcus Trufant – SEA is claiming to be 100 percent (back injury) and could be the X-factor in Seattle’s defense. He said the same thing last year and played horrifically, leading the league in pass interference among other unmentionables.

Malcolm Jenkins – NO is an intriguing player to watch in the sense that Sharper’s knee may not be ready to go and could force him on the PUP list at the start of the season—so for six games or so, I could have a viable beast at CB. But only time will tell.

So many decisions, so little time.

But as you hear so many people say: Your watch list is always the X-factor in your team’s grand design. For now, I think I will simply close the window until more solid options come along.

What do you guys think?

If you enjoyed this piece, check out my 10 Burning Fantasy Questions For The Upcoming 2010 Season.

 

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