Minnesota VikingsDownload App

The Mutiny of the Minnesota Vikings

MINNEAPOLIS - AUGUST 28:  Brett Favre #4 of the Minnesota Vikings gives instructions against the Seattle Seahawks during a preseason NFL game at Mall of America Field at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome on August 28, 2010  in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
Chris McGrath/Getty Images
Space CowboyContributor IJanuary 3, 2017

We have all seen them, whether in organized sports leagues we have participated in or in our respective work places. The Primadonnas; those that want nothing more than to have all the attention, all the glory, without an inkling of respect for those around them-especially those of authority.

Never has a Primadonna been more out in the open than the Viking’s Bret Favre. He makes no secret that in his mind the team revolves around him; that they are nothing without him.

He knows that he has Childress and the team under his thumb. What’s the problem with this? In Woulk’s novel, “The Caine Mutiny” Willie Keith sees the ship’s commander, De Vriess as an unfit captain and gets the entire crew on his side. Eventually there was a mutiny on the ship, stripping De Vriess of his position.

Now De Vriess could be compared to Childress or Favre..Let’s look at it from the Childress angle. Childress, unlike Captain De Vriess, is an organized, punctual man who wants the best for his crew. However, he shares De Vriess lack of leadership.

Favre orchestrated a mutiny of his own right. Letting the team know who runs the program. Letting the team know that Childress is below him.

It would have been interesting to be in the room when Hutchinson, Longwell, and Allen visited Favre. I would suspect that Favre let his shipmates, if you will, know how he felt about Childress.

The Caine didn’t sail smoothly after Willie and his team led the Mutiny against De Vriess. Neither will the Vikings sail smoothly through the season with two Captain’s vying for authority.

Don’t be surprised to see a lot of reversed calls from Mr. Favre, and tension on the sidelines. Both of which are a great formula for a ship wreck of a season.

 has Childress and the team under his thumb. What’s the problem with this? In Woulk’s novel, “The Caine Mutiny” Willie Keith sees the ship’s commander, William De Vriess as an unfit captain and gets the entire crew on his side. Eventually there was a mutiny on the ship, stripping De Vriess of his position.

Now De Vriess could be compared to Childress or Favre..Let’s look at it from the Childress angle. Childress, unlike Captain De Vriess, is an organized, punctual man who wants the best for his crew. However, he shares De Vriess lack of leadership.

Favre orchestrated a mutiny of his own right. Letting the team know who runs the program. Letting the team know that Childress is below him.

It would have been interesting to be in the room when Hutchinson, Longwell, and Allen. I would suspect that Favre let his shipmates, if you will, know how he felt about Childress.

The Caine didn’t sail smoothly after Willie and his team led the Mutiny against De Vriess. Neither will the Vikings sail smoothly through the season with two Captain’s vying for authority.

Don’t be surprised to see a lot of reversed calls from Mr. Favre, and tension on the sidelines. Both of which are a great formula for a ship wreck of a season.

 

Where can I comment?

Stay on your game

Latest news, insights, and forecasts on your teams across leagues.

Choose Teams
Get it on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Real-time news for your teams right on your mobile device.

Download
Copyright © 2017 Bleacher Report, Inc. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. BleacherReport.com is part of Bleacher Report – Turner Sports Network, part of the Turner Sports and Entertainment Network. Certain photos copyright © 2017 Getty Images. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of Getty Images is strictly prohibited. AdChoices