New York-New Jersey 2014 Super Bowl Is an All-Time Blunder

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New York-New Jersey 2014 Super Bowl Is an All-Time Blunder
Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images

Society has certainly seen its share of famous mistakes.  

A few examples come to mind: The making of Bonfire of the Vanities into a movie, changing the recipe for Coca-Cola, Dan Quayle running for public office, cutting Michael Jordan from his high school basketball team, and Decca Records turning the Beatles down for a recording contract. 

Well, now we can add New York/New Jersey hosting the Super Bowl at the New Meadowlands Stadium in 2014 to the list.

Really, what was anyone thinking when this was passed through a league vote on Tuesday? 

Here are just a few of the countless reasons this will likely go down as an all-time mistake:

1. The weather.  I have been to New York in January and February, and it has usually been cold...make that freezing.  New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg said, "People talk about the weather, but, you know, this is football, not beach volleyball."

Except for one small factor Mr. Bloomberg.  Over half the league plays in a dome or a warm-weather city.  The game starts at close to 7 pm.   It's called a competitive disadvantage when you aren't used to playing in 30 degree or less. 

2. The falsehood that New Yorkers will be able to enjoy this game. 

Repeat after me: New Meadowlands Stadium is located in East Rutherford, NEW JERSEY.  I went to the Old Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford for several football games and not one of them felt like a genuine New York or "Broadway" experience. 

Now, take into consideration that an average Super Bowl ticket goes for roughly $2,000 to $3,000 at a minimum.  This should be a nasty feeling of deja vu for the average New Yorker, who can't afford tickets to the new Yankee Stadium either.  Remember, if you do get in, you at least get to freeze for free.

3. Visitors won't want to come.  Part of the appeal of Super Bowl week for attendees is traveling to a beautiful destination, kicking back at parties, and enjoying the experience. 

When the NFL had the Super Bowl in Detroit, many fans and media members who went entered into a collective depression during the trip.  Expect a similar experience after Super Bowl XLVIII.

Certainly, don't expect the following statement from those planning to make the trip.  "I can't wait to go to East Rutherford and get down with my bad self."  Granted, most of the parties would be in New York City.  Just don't expect to get into them unless you are willing to match paying that ticket price, or they don't have to ask for your name at the door. 

Do I really need to get into the joy of the subway and taxis while being in formal wear?

4. Now, every city will want a Super Bowl and should have the right to get one.  John Harbaugh, head coach of the Baltimore Ravens, wants one, and why not? Heck, Baltimore has a first-rate facility and a harbor to sell.  The temperature might even be a few degrees warmer.

Philadelphia has a relatively new field, and if you run onto it you can probably get tased and pay even more thousands of dollars in fines—sorry Philly fans, that was uncalled for, but I had to make a point. 

You know hosting a Super Bowl can't be far behind for the New England Patriots, the league's lovechild. 

Which brings us to why New York/New Jersey hosting a Super Bowl is such an all-time blunder. 

Well, it could be worse. 

They could put a Super Bowl far outside the United States, subjecting the players to severe jet lag and travel fatigue when they should be at their physical and mental best.  The game could take place, say, in London, England. 

Shhh! They already do that for regular season games.

 

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