Zach Rogers Scouting Report: NFL Outlook for Tennessee WR

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Zach Rogers Scouting Report: NFL Outlook for Tennessee WR
Randy Sartin-USA TODAY Sports
Does Zach Rogers have what it takes to become a slot receiver in the NFL?

Zach Rogers likely got overlooked at the University of Tennessee due to playing alongside the likes of Justin Hunter and Cordarrelle Patterson. However, Rogers was arguably the most consistent receiver for Tennessee during the 2012 season.

While he didn't have the huge statistics like Patterson or Hunter, he did prove to have extremely reliable hands and recorded seven touchdowns his senior season.

Today we'll preview the NFL outlook for Rogers.

 

Strengths

Rogers' biggest strength is his hands. He'll constantly make difficult receptions look easy, including balls thrown away from his frame.

He has the willingness to cross the middle of the field and rarely drops passes after contact. Rogers also has a long frame and solid overall awareness.

 

Weaknesses

At only 172 pounds, Rogers desperately needs to add weight if he wants to produce in the NFL. The problem, however, is that Rogers' frame doesn't appear like it can add much weight.

Rogers also lacks the athleticism and overall strength to play on the outside in the NFL. His blocking could be improved, as could his crispness when running routes.

 

Tools

Rogers simply lacks the athleticism to be a legitimate threat in the NFL.

Rogers wasn't invited to the 2013 NFL Scouting Combine, but he did participate at the Tennessee pro day. There he ran a 4.49 40-yard dash with a 32" vertical.

Those numbers prove that Rogers lacks the athletic ability to be a legitimate threat in the NFL.

 

Intangibles/Character

He was never in the spotlight while at Tennessee, but seemed to thrive in the role the team had built for him. He contributed sparingly during his four years in college, but showed hard work and a desire to be a team player.

Rogers should be a positive addition to an NFL locker room.

 

System

Rogers played the majority of his snaps as the slot receiver for Tennessee. He has very little experience being anything else in an offense.

 

Release

When given space, Rogers can have a solid release off the line of scrimmage. However, he lacks the size to not be re-routed when jammed by receivers.

He has decent overall speed, but it isn't an explosive speed that will allow him to consistently win against cornerbacks in press coverage.

 

Ball Skills

Rogers displays the ability to make receptions far from his frame in all directions. He's got great awareness when working near the sidelines, too.

 

Routes

There is too much stiffness to Rogers when he's breaking in and out of his routes. He struggles to consistently run clean routes.

When he struggles with his footwork, he loses his acceleration and simply becomes ineffective and easy to cover for opposing cornerbacks.

 

Hands

This is easily the most likable trait about Rogers' overall game. His hands are as consistent as they come in terms of prospects for this year's draft.

Rogers has extremely consistent hands. He also has the ability to make difficult receptions look easy.

He'll consistently make catches away from his frame and displays great concentration on crossing routes and near the sideline.

 

Run After Catch

While Rogers doesn't have elite playmaking skills, he has a sneakiness to his game in the open field that allows him to make plays. He's got good short-area quickness and footwork to occasionally pick up extra yards after the catch.

 

Blocking

Rogers simply isn't physical enough to be successful as a blocker. He rarely wins at the point of attack and will do so even less in the NFL.

 

Future Role/Scheme Versatility

The only way that Rogers is going to make an NFL roster is as a slot receiver. He doesn't have the size or physicality to consistently win on the outside in the NFL.

As a slot receiver, however, Rogers looks like a draftable prospect due to his consistent hands and fearlessness when making receptions over the middle of the field.

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