Breaking Down Tyler Bray's Pro Day Workout

Wes StueveContributor IIIMarch 21, 2013

STARKVILLE, MS - OCTOBER 13:  Quarterback Tyler Bray #8 of the Tennessee Volunteers rolls out to pass against the Mississippi State Bulldogs on October 13, 2012 at Davis Wade Stadium in Starkville, Mississippi. (Photo by Butch Dill/Getty Images)
Butch Dill/Getty Images

A quarterback's pro day is pretty typical. He throws a few passes, impresses everyone and doesn't really prove anything. Tyler Bray's pro day was a bit different.

He didn't make much of an impact with his actual workout—in fact, it's difficult to find any information on it—but his quotes and meetings did make some headlines.

Many analysts like Bray for his arm strength and size. The 6'6" 230-pounder has a rocket arm and possesses the ability to make any throw on the field. He is exactly the type of quarterback who would excel in an open workout with no actual defense.

Yet that's not what people are talking about. Bray has a reputation for being a bit of a troublemaker—he had to pay for damages after throwing beer bottles at a parked car in July—and his comments at Tennessee's pro day didn't do anything to help.

On being a backup quarterback to start his NFL career, according to govols247.com, Bray said, "Well, they'd be paying to do it, so...yeah, that's fine."

Exactly the attitude teams want, to be sure.

But Bray didn't stop there.

So Bray wants his legacy to be about something that...he didn't do. That probably isn't a strong indication of Bray accomplishing many positive thing at Tennessee. It generally isn't good when a player can't come up with something good to say about his legacy.

In other pro day news, the Pittsburgh Steelers made headlines by taking Bray to dinner. Some analysts expect Pittsburgh to target a backup or quarterback-of-the future, and Bray's strong arm makes him an appealing project.

What did we learn from Bray's pro day?

He isn't good at quotes, his legacy is questionable and the Steelers are interested. 

Like most pro days, not much was learned about his actual on-field ability.