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10 Biggest Draft Fails in Kansas City Chiefs History

Bill RobbinsCorrespondent IJanuary 9, 2017

10 Biggest Draft Fails in Kansas City Chiefs History

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    Throughout their history, the Kansas City Chiefs have failed with many NFL Draft picks that they have made.

    WR Sylvester Morris and DTs Junior Siavii and Ryan Sims are just a few of the more recent failures that KC has had in the draft.

    Here is the full list of the 10 biggest draft fails in Chiefs franchise history.

TE Elmore Stephens: 1975, Second Round

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    You might be reading this name and wondering if you have ever heard of this Chief.

    Chances are that you haven't.

    Stephens never played a down with KC after being drafted in the second round of the '75 Draft. He was later was a suspect in a kidnapping/murder investigation.

    He has to be one of the worst character draft picks in Chiefs history.

OT Brian Jozwiak: 1986, First Round

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    It seemed that OT Brian Jozwiak was going to fill a much needed hole on the Chiefs offensive line back in 1986.

    However, he ended up becoming another failed draft pick for this organization.

    Jozwiak started only three games in three seasons, before suffering a career-ending hip injury in 1988.

    He's also one of the biggest OL busts ever in the history of this franchise.

RB Harvey Williams: 1991, First Round

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    Former Chiefs running back Harvey Williams had a lot of promise when he came into the NFL, but never lived up to the hype.

    The 21st overall pick of the '91 NFL Draft turned out to be a big failure for KC.

    He rushed for only 858 yards and two touchdowns in his brief three-year stay in Kansas City.

    Unlike some of the other players on this list, he did have a couple of nice seasons once he left KC, but he still failed to impress while he was in town.

LB Percy Snow: 1990, First Round

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    After the Chiefs struck gold with OLB Derrick Thomas just one year before, they thought that they could do it again when they selected Michigan State ILB Percy Snow as their first-round selection in 1990.

    This time, they failed.

    Snow showed flashes of greatness in his rookie season when he picked up two sacks, but a car accident derailed his once-promising career.

    To many, he is still regarded as one of the biggest busts in Chiefs history.

DT Junior Siavii: 2004, Second Round

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    In early 2004, the Chiefs fell in love with former University of Oregon DT Junior Siavii.

    They liked his ability to stop the run and be a force in the middle of the defensive line, which is something that he excelled in during college.

    Unfortunately for KC, it never translated to success in the NFL.

    He played just two seasons with the Chiefs, contributing just 15 tackles and one sack while handing the organization another failed defensive line draft pick to add to the list.

QB Pete Beathard: 1964, First Round

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    If Todd Blackledge was the worst QB that the Chiefs have ever drafted in their franchise history, then Pete Beathard can't be very far behind him.

    The former USC signal caller was the first overall pick in the 1964 NFL Draft. He threw just eight touchdown passes in four-plus seasons as a Chief.

    For his career, he ended up throwing nearly twice as many interceptions as touchdowns.

    This was hardly the pick that owner Lamar Hunt and Kansas City were hoping for when they took Beathard with the first pick of of the draft.

DT Ryan Sims: 2002, First Round

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    How can forget the Ryan Sims era in Kansas City?

    It seems as if it lasted forever, and the Chiefs weren't able to get an production out of the former first-round selection.

    Sims was too lazy and lacked the talent to become an impact player at the defensive tackle position in the NFL. But he was able to stay on KC's roster for five painful seasons in which he only registered 54 tackles and five sacks.

    It's hard to imagine that some scouts thought that he would have a better pro career than his former defensive line teammate in college, Julius Peppers.

WR Sylvester Morris: 2000, First Round

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    When the Chiefs took Jackson State receiver Sylvester Morris in the first round of the 2000 NFL Draft, they were hoping that he could be the future at the wide receiver position in Kansas City.

    Instead, he played only one full season and had to call it quits after just a few years in the league.

    Morris suffered from knee injuries, which limited him to just 15 games during his brief NFL career.

    It's really a shame that injuries slowed him down after his first year, because he had a chance to be a solid wideout in this league after an impressive rookie campaign.

OT Trezelle Jenkins: 1995, First Round

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    Trezelle Jenkins is a name that many around Kansas City would like to forget.

    The big offensive lineman had a solid career at the University of Michigan and appeared to be on his way to stardom in the NFL.

    However, this never happened for Jenkins.

    He played in just nine games in his three seasons for the Chiefs, and his lack of work ethic and weight issues caused him to end his career after just three years in the league.

QB Todd Blackledge: 1983, First Round

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    Todd Blackledge is easily the biggest draft fail in Chiefs history.

    He was selected seventh overall in the 1983 NFL Draft, but fell very short of his first-round status.

    The former Penn State star played just five seasons in Kansas City and also threw six more interceptions than touchdowns during that span.

    What makes this pick look even worse is that KC hasn't selected a quarterback in the first round since Blackledge was taken nearly 29 years ago.

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