U.S. Channels a Captivating Scene In World Cup As Our Nation Believes

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U.S. Channels a Captivating Scene In World Cup As Our Nation Believes
Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

At most cities in a nation sporting events draws much buzz and excitement, enthusiastic sports fanatics have gathered at local pubs to cheer on the U.S. National Soccer Team. The casual fans have diminished the biggest tournament that happens every four years, but now a large portion of the world’s population closely glance at the most popular sporting event globally.

All over the world, soccer is greatly observed and idolized as a cultural convention, alluring the minds of children who eventually becomes attach and benefits from a civilized activity.

But in a nation where soccer is downplayed and forgotten, as folks are merely paranoid and brainwashed of David Beckham, a gorgeous soccer star known as a celebrity and for his sex appeal, selling the sport of soccer based on his fame and endorsed products, we are suddenly believers and grateful to witness the U.S. attain the unprecedented.

All the populace are raving specifically about soccer in the slowest months of the sports seasons, willing to immerse in the global landscape. With the latest finish in a historic fashion, the U.S defied logic, for once, rising as a hallowed favorite to contend in the World Cup. Frankly, there’s no longer a suggestion of skepticism or disgrace, but a feeling of intuition and certainty, shunning the traditional flaws.

Here in America sports is one thing. But soccer, of course, is another. Because my instincts tell me it’s a sport that never seemed mesmerizing to the average citizen residing in the States, we are stuck to believe that there is no consensus perception. Then again, this is a more venturous age in sports, meaning the average devotee is satisfy watching men tear back and forth down the field wearing cleats and shorts, while dripping sweat and exhausted during a long-lasting contest.

This is greatly a country that never cared about the dying sport. This is a game that never absorbed much attention, considering that futbol isn’t football, but a boring festivity without action-packed tackles and muscular hits most are accustomed to seeing in the fall and winter months. Think of it as foosball, a strategic tabletop game that you find often in arcades.

Point is, the foosball table rarely generates a crowd as pinball tables or electronic video games rally a large assembly. And it even seems like soccer is the version of the foosball table in a nation that treasures a physical and brutal game. That is football, of course, not futbol.

But all things were viewed differently and veered instantly, following the American’s thrilling win against Algeria Wednesday night, with Landon Donovan booting a game-winning, historical goal in the 91st minute to propel the U.S. to a 1-0 shutout. Never did we suspect the Americans to fulfill a miracle or even advance to the Round of 16, knowing they had a highly talented and crafty national team with coveted and goal-oriented stars.

If this is a sport played universally, then we should acknowledge the emergence and intensity of the Americans, vehemently competing with spirit, strong character and humanity. For the moment, the U.S. is confronted with immense expectations for meeting uncommon standards, bringing a sense of pride and installing aspiration in a subsiding activity.

What’s very heartwarming is that the guys representing a patriotic homeland are classy and dynamic, giving us reason to believe as the world is convinced to give the entire core the benefit of the doubt. It’s a miracle to some extent that the U.S. is stronger than ever and has mellowed as an indomitable crew.

You can recall when the Americans were lackluster and too inexperience. You can recall when the boys were hopeless and voiceless, disillusioned for failing to revise all the botches and disadvantages.

All this happened four years ago, a doleful moment when Donovan was inexperience and hadn’t developed as an inspirational force. All this happened last decade, a depressing time when the whole team was fearful and timidity.

Four years later, this is a soccer team with guts and bravery, excelling on the high emotions of Jozy Altidore, Clint Dempsey, Donovan, and ultimately Tim Howard, who is arguably one of the greatest goalkeepers worldwide.

Can they win it all? It’s very likely. Do you believe? If you don’t, you should believe in the Americans. The magnitude of winning and outlasting all teams to be presented with the beautiful cup could amplify the growth of a mediocre tournament and erode a relentless farce. With three matches alone, the Americans renounced an imperfect tradition and have verified a beloved tradition by performing with stamina, persistence and energy.

By virtue, the U.S. isn’t vulnerable or effortless in eliminating from contention, fighting off their weaknesses and charming without hearing critics define the Americans as obscure or an embarrassment to the States, but instead credible of capping a miracle.

There have been six consecutive World Cup appearances, including a final-eight in 2002 for the U.S., and during each contest we never brought together a friendly cult as fans are urged to celebrate historic marks and remarkable plateaus, wishing for the happiest ending in American soccer history.

Each casual fan has rejoiced this enormous moment in American sports, bigger than the Winter Games in Vancouver it seems. Although we live on a continent that doesn’t adore soccer nor share gratefulness and admiration, we have rapidly opened a chapter and turned it into a beautiful story.

Currently, the U.S. is ranked 18 places higher worldwide than Ghana, and has six straight World Cup appearances. In other words, the Americans aren’t the underdog or vulnerable, but have parity and gifted athletes to manhandle the team from Africa. In fact, the U.S. has an easier road than any other team in the World Cup.

Do the Americans a favor, applaud and appreciate what they have accomplished during a watchful tournament. Do the U.S. a favor, honor their success and wish for the best.

It’s very possible that the U.S. can win the World Cup, but it’s hard to imagine the Americans turning it into a popular sport here in the States.  

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