J.D. Martinez Calls Astros Criticism 'A Little Bit Too Much' Amid Red Sox Probe

Megan ArmstrongSenior Analyst IFebruary 17, 2020

FT. MYERS, FL - FEBRUARY 17: J.D. Martinez #28 the Boston Red Sox speaks to the media during a press conference during a team workout on February 17, 2020 at jetBlue Park at Fenway South in Fort Myers, Florida. (Photo by Billie Weiss/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images)
Billie Weiss/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images

Boston Red Sox outfielder J.D. Martinez is ready to move on. 

Negative reactions have been the story of the day since MLB released its official findings from an investigation into the Houston Astros that found the organization to have illegally used in-game technology to steal opponents' signs throughout their 2017 World Series-winning campaign.

"I understand players' frustrations and stuff like that, but I think in my opinion, it's already getting a little bit too much," Martinez said Monday, per ESPN's Joon Lee.

The three-time All-Star continued:

"We have to move past it at some point. We can't continue to talk about it. I know it's frustrating right now. People want to talk about it, this and that, but it's 2020. I think teams are aware of everything that's kind of happened. ... From here on out, it's going to be a different message in the clubhouses and a different environment with people, like steroids. The punishments were so harsh that people weren't going to attempt to think about doing anymore. I think it will get to that point."

The Astros were penalized with a $5 million fine and one-year suspensions without pay for then-manager AJ Hinch and then-general manager Jeffrey Luhnow. Hinch and Luhnow were fired by Houston shortly thereafter. 

Players involved in the scheme were not disciplined, which commissioner Rob Manfred defended in an interview with ESPN's Karl Ravech on Sunday. 

"I understand people's desire to have the players pay a price for what went on here," Manfred said, in part. "I think if you watch the players, watch their faces when they have to deal with this issue publicly, they have paid a price. ... We ended up where we ended up in pursuit of really, I think, the most important goal of getting the facts and getting them out there for people to know it."

Martinez agreed with Manfred that leaving players immune was the best course of action. 

"If it weren't for players talking and getting that immunity, I don't think no one would have ever have said anything," the 32-year-old said. 

The Red Sox were directly affected by the scandal. Alex Cora served as the Astros bench coach in 2017 and was named in MLB's report. As a result, Boston fired him after two seasons as its manager that included winning the 2018 World Series.

 

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