Indy 500: Why the Action at Indy Is Better Than the Daytona 500

Matt FaulconerFeatured ColumnistMay 29, 2011

Indy 500: Why the Action at Indy Is Better Than the Daytona 500

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    INDIANAPOLIS, IN - MAY 29:  Scott Dixon of New Zealand, driver of the #9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Dallara Honda, leads the field during the IZOD IndyCar Series Indianapolis 500 Mile Race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on May 29, 2011 in Indianapolis, In
    Robert Laberge/Getty Images

    The Daytona 500 is referred to as "the Super Bowl of Racing"; however, the action at Daytona does not compare to the action at the Indianapolis 500.

    There is no doubt that the Indy 500 and the Daytona 500 are the two biggest races of the entire season, and race fans and casual fans alike both look forward to the day's events.

    With the Indy 500 well underway, Bleacher Report is here to tell you why the Indianapolis 500 is better than the Daytona 500.

5. Driver's Seat

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    INDIANAPOLIS, IN - MAY 27:  Dario Franchitti of Scotland, driver of the #10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing Dallara Honda, competes during the IZOD Pit Stop Challenge on Carb Day for the 95th running of the Indianapolis 500 on May 27, 2011 at the Indianapolis
    Robert Laberge/Getty Images

    The coolest part about IndyCar racing is the fact the driver's seats are open and you can actually see the driver's head.

    They aren't surrounded by metal and inside of a car; they are instead left extremely vulnerable in the driver's seat of their car. 

    Personally, I would be scared out of my mind sitting in a car that looks like a go-cart and hitting speeds of 250 miles per hour.

    I would feel much more secure as a NASCAR racer, even though at high speeds, anything can lead to disaster.

4. NASCAR Fan's Tattoos

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    No offense to NASCAR fans, but the stereotypical NASCAR fan ruins it for the rest of them. 

    That tattoos is quite possible one of the dumbest tattoos I have ever seen, and that isn't the only horrible NASCAR tattoo I've seen.

    Honestly, if I went to a NASCAR event and saw that guy showing me that tattoo, I would be horrified and likely scarred for the rest of my life.

    The picture alone horrifies me enough.

3. Faster Cars

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    INDIANAPOLIS, IN - MAY 29:  Takuma Sato of Japan, driver of the #5 Lotus KV Racing Technologies Dallara Honda, leads a line of cars during the IZOD IndyCar Series Indianapolis 500 Mile Race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on May 29, 2011 in Indianapolis, I
    Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images

    The Indy 500 features cars that are faster, quicker and shiftier.  These cars can reach speeds at over 250 miles per hour, which is about 25 percent faster than stock cars.

    The Indy 500 has a much faster pace than the Daytona 500, and Indycars are much shiftier.  Watching Indycars break out of a caution is one of the more exciting events in racing, as they are generally swerve back and forth trying to move up the order.

    Watching one of these cars make a pass at speeds in excess of 250 mph is extremely entertaining.

2. Style of IndyCars

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    HOMESTEAD, FL - OCTOBER 01: Dan Wheldon of Great Britain, drives the #4 National Guard Panther Racing Dallara Honda during practice for the IZOD IndyCar Series NextEra Energy Indy Championships at Homestead-Miami Speedway on October 1, 2010 in Homestead,
    Nick Laham/Getty Images

    IndyCars are extremely unique and they look like race cars, while stock cars just look like modified cars.  There is no denying that the design of IndyCars is much cooler than the design of a standard stock car.

    As mentioned previously, the open driver's seat is one thing that makes the car more attractive to the eye, as does the open wheel design.

    Stock cars have to get involved in a pretty serious accident to lose multiple tires, while IndyCars can lose a tire by grazing the wall, so it makes for much more precise racing.

1. IndyCar Wrecks

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    NASCAR wrecks can look cool sometimes, but there is no denying that when a crash occurs in IndyCar, it is much more spectacular. 

    IndyCar crashes are absolutely horrifying to watch, but they make for great television, as long as everyone comes out unharmed.

    These crashes generally involve flips, and the car appears to disintegrate in mid-air sometimes.  I've seen some crazy NASCAR crashes in my life, but nearly every IndyCar crash is dramatic.