Report: NBA, NBPA Targeting 2020 NBA Draft for End of 1-and-Done Rule

Mike Chiari@mikechiariFeatured ColumnistApril 25, 2018

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver announces in Indianapolis, Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017 that Indianapolis will host the 2021 NBA All-Star game . (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
Michael Conroy/Associated Press

A change to the NBA's one-and-done rule reportedly may be in the works for the 2020 NBA draft.

According to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski, the NBA and NBA Players Association are discussing a revision, and the 2020 draft is likely the earliest it will be implemented.

If a change is agreed upon, it will allow high school seniors to enter the draft without having to spend a year in college or an alternative professional league.

Wojnarowski's report came on the heels of a report from the Commission on College Basketball, which recommended the end of the one-and-done rule, per Jill Martin of CNN.

"The NBA and the NBPA thank Secretary Rice and the members of the Commission on College Basketball for their commitment to address the issues facing men’s college basketball," NBA Commissioner Adam Silver and NBA Executive Director Michele Roberts said in a joint statement to Martin. "We support NCAA policy and enforcement reforms that will better safeguard the well-being of players while imposing greater accountability on representatives and programs that fail to uphold the values of the game. We also share the Commission's concern with the current state of youth basketball and echo that all stakeholders—including the NBA, NBPA, NCAA, and USA Basketball—have a collective responsibility to help bring about positive change. Regarding the NBA’s draft eligibility rules, the NBA and NBPA will continue to assess them in order to promote the best interests of players and the game."

The one-and-done rule has been in place since 2006, but several players successfully went from high school to the NBA before that, including LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett.

Changing the one-and-done rule has been a hot-button issue in recent years. Its implementation has essentially forced players to attend college even if they don't want to, having them risk injury before netting an NBA contract.

In March, ESPN's Brian Windhorst reported that the NBA was exploring the possibility of expanding the G League in order to make it a viable option for players who would rather play professionally for a year than go to college before entering the draft.

Windhorst also reported that the NBA wants to interact more with elite-level players in high school to prepare them for success in the NBA, and that could be the first logical step toward making one-and-done a thing of the past.

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