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Phillies: Incrementally and Synergistically Nearing Their Goal

NEW YORK - JUNE 11:  Jayson Werth #28 of the Philadelphia Phillies in the dugout against the New York Mets on June 11, 2009 at Citi Field in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.  (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
Doug DonofrioCorrespondent IJuly 11, 2009

You can't argue with how the Phillies have constructed their baseball team.

A combination of three general managers: Ed Wade, Pat Gillick, and now Rueben Amaro, have all had their fingerprints on the makeup of this team.

Let us count the ways to a potential dynasty. It started with bringing up a young, talented core with which to build around. That nucleus is forming the foundation of a dynasty. Although a dynasty is presumptuous, it may not be too far off.

Chase Utley, Ryan Howard, Jimmy Rollins, Cole Hamels, Ryan Madson, Brett Myers, Shane Victorino (Dodgers organization), and Pat Burrell, now with Tampa Bay, were all brought in by former general manager Ed Wade.

Wade knew and understood talent, as a former disciple of former Phillies general manager Lee Thomas.

Where Ed Wade fell short, however, was adding those strategic incremental pieces to get to that next level.

Spinning in mediocrity from 2001-05, the Phillies decided, despite Wade's keen ability to draft, nurture, and develop young talent, to relieve Wade of his duties and hire a true tactician and one of baseball's brilliant baseball minds in Pat Gillick.

It was certainly Gillick who took the Phillies to that level all teams seekwinning a world championship.

How did Gillick and his brain trust propel a bright young nucleus of players with an underachieving complementary cast into the very best in baseball?

He did it by acquiring lower level dollar incremental pieces with which when all added up equated to a greater whole. This is what is known as synergy: The whole being greater than the sum of the individual parts. Some of those parts were in the names of Werth, Dobbs, Feliz, Ruiz, Lidge, Blanton, Bruntlett, Jenkins, Coste, Stairs, Romero, Eyre, Durbin, and Moyer.

It would be fair to say that other than Lidge's $9 million, Gillick did get the most bang for his buck with this group.

As Gillick stated, "Winning is done by adding smaller pieces, when in summation, can potentially maximize collective chemistry and synergy than a larger deal that may not fit in with your foundation or team philosophy".

I believe and am a student of Gillick's teachings and principles. Now Amaro, the protege, takes the baton and puts his relay team together.

Ibanez and Park, are first in line, and who knows what is next. While teams like the Yankees, Boston, Mets, and Dodgers look for major signings, the Phillies strategically add smaller dollar players, that when added up, achieve a greater value.

The Phillies' front office deserves the credit for having a plan and not veering from it. A combination of tangibility, intangibility, mental toughness, leadership, and grit has created the plausibility for the greatest journey of any professional sports team.

That journey begins with a young core, complementary role players, and a cerebral management.

That journey ends in the form of a dynasty, subjected to just a few who are fortunate enough to have all the pieces come together at just the right time, with just the right formula.

 

 

 

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