Flyers' Daniel Carcillo Suspended Four Games for Fight with Matt Bradley

Eric LaForgeCorrespondent IDecember 7, 2009

PHILADELPHIA - DECEMBER 03:  Braydon Coburn #5 of the Philadelphia Flyers skates against the Vancouver Canucks on December 3, 2009 at Wachovia Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
Jim McIsaac/Getty Images

After receiving every penalty known to man, things have just gotten worst for the Flyers' Daniel Carcillo.

During a game Saturday night against the Washington Capitals, Carcillo was given a ton of penalties during a confrontation with Washington's Matt Bradley. He received a minor for cross-checking, a minor for instigation, a major for fighting, a 10-minute misconduct, and a game misconduct, all on the same play.

Carcillo received a four-game suspension, and, according to NHL.com is being fined just over $43,000.

Bradley was able to avoid any penalties and his team was not punished. The Flyers, on the other hand, had to find a way to kill a nine minute penalty.

After looking at the replay (see the replay ) a few times I have to say that I disagree with a lot of the penalties Carcillo received.

He easily could have gotten away with a minor for unsportsmanlike conduct, and cross-checking, since he did try to get Bradley to fight, and delivered a pretty unfair cross-check.

I think that it was really unfair that he received a ton of penalties and Bradley didn't receive any, even though he was planning on fighting. I don't think that Carcillo should be receiving this type of punishment, especially the 10-minute misconduct.

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Seriously, what's the point of assessing a 10-minute misconduct and a game misconduct at the same time?

The only thing the 10-minute misconduct did was put another penalty on the score sheet.

However, Carcillo is a repeat offender and that may have had something to do with the amount of penalties he received, but it's still too many to give to one player on the same play. Especially when it's not being called on the guy he was fighting against.