Report: Deceased Maryland OL Jordan McNair Showed Symptoms Before Collapse

Mike Chiari@mikechiariFeatured ColumnistAugust 10, 2018

BALTIMORE, MD - SEPTEMBER 21:  A view of the Maryland Terrapins helmet before the game against the West Virginia Mountaineers at M&T Bank Stadium on September 21,2013 in Baltimore, Maryland.  (Photo by G Fiume/Maryland Terrapins/Getty Images)
G Fiume/Getty Images

University of Maryland offensive lineman Jordan McNair reportedly showed signs of extreme exhaustion prior to his hospitalization in May and death in June.

According to ESPN.com's Heather Dinich, sources said McNair appeared to have difficulty standing while running 110-yard sprints before collapsing during an outdoor football workout on May 29.

McNair also reportedly had a body temperature of 106 degrees before dying of heatstroke two weeks after he was hospitalized, per Dinich.

According to McNair family attorney Billy Murphy, McNair had a seizure roughly 45 minutes after the workout began: "Our reading of the medical records and the 911 call Maryland made to the EMT to come to the field reveal that 45 minutes into the practice, he had convulsions and a seizure on the field, and the 911 call reflects emergency personnel noted McNair had experienced a seizure."

The McNair family has hired a law firm to investigate whether those involved with the Maryland football team took proper measures to care for the player.

Murphy explained the family's areas of concern:

"Our preliminary investigation reveals there is an unexplained one-hour time period when nothing significant was done to avoid the complications of heatstroke. Although there is some evidence they allegedly tried to cool him down, he should have been iced immediately. He presented at the hospital with a temperature of 106, which means he was not cooled down.

"We're very concerned about the unexplained one hour between the time of the seizure and hyperventilating that was observed by a coach, and what happened in that remaining hour before the EMT people were actually called. This points to an utter disregard of the health of this player, and we are extraordinarily concerned that the coaches did not react appropriately to his injury."

According to Dinich, several Maryland football players spoke anonymously about what they saw and how McNair was handled during his time of distress.

The players who commented said training personnel attempted to walk with McNair after he initially collapsed. One of the players questioned if the proper measures were taken: "It was a good [distance] for a guy in his state to be walking, and it was away from the athletic training building, away from any resource that he probably needed at the time. Probably 100 percent the opposite way."

Dinich, Adam Rittenberg and Tom VanHaaren of ESPN.com provided further detail into the culture at Maryland:

"The language is profane, and it's demeaning at times," a former staffer said. "When you're characterizing people in such derogatory and demeaning terms, particularly if they don't have a skill level you think they need to aspire to, or they may never get, then it's rough to watch and see because if it was your son, you wouldn't want anybody talking to your son that way."

McNair was a 6'4", 325-pound offensive tackle from Randallstown, Maryland, who was set to enter his sophomore season with the Terrapins.

Murphy added that a lawsuit is "likely" to be filed against the University of Maryland.

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