Zach Randolph Confirms He Will End Comeback Attempt, Retire After 17 NBA Seasons

Scott Polacek@@ScottPolacekFeatured ColumnistDecember 27, 2019

Sacramento Kings forward Zach Randolph (50) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
David Zalubowski/Associated Press

NBA veteran Zach Randolph is calling it a career after playing 17 seasons for the Portland Trail Blazers, New York Knicks, Los Angeles Clippers, Memphis Grizzlies and Sacramento Kings.

Randolph told TMZ Sports on Wednesday that he was no longer considering a return to the court:

He didn't play a single game during the 2018-19 campaign—which would have been his 18th—and was waived by the Dallas Mavericks in February after they acquired him via trade from the Kings. He retires with career averages of 16.6 points and 9.1 rebounds per game.

The Michigan State product entered the league as a first-round pick for the Trail Blazers in 2001 and earned a number of accolades throughout his career, including two All-Star appearances, the 2003-04 Most Improved Player award and 2010-11 All-NBA third-team recognition.

At his best, Randolph was a physical presence who overwhelmed defenders on the low blocks with his post moves and soft touch around the rim. He routinely challenged for double-doubles throughout his prime and was a go-to offensive option for a number of years with double-digit scoring totals every season after his first two in the league.

Randolph also had five seasons with more than 20 points a night and nine seasons with double-digit rebounding averages during his career.

Despite playing for a number of teams, Randolph will likely be remembered most for his impact on the Grizzlies, where he averaged 16.8 points and 10.2 rebounds. He helped lead the team to the playoffs for seven straight seasons and turned the culture of the team around in the difficult Western Conference.

Video Play Button
Videos you might like

Majority owner Robert Pera said no Grizzlies player would wear Randolph's No. 50 again, making him the first in the organization to have a number retired:

Although Randolph never made an NBA Finals, he appeared in 70 playoff games and was one of the most notable veteran leaders of his generation.