Cup of Coffee, Part Two

Blake VandeBunteContributor IOctober 15, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO - AUGUST 9:  Francisco Cordero #48 of the Cincinnati Reds throws a pitch against the San Francisco Giants at AT&T Park  on August 9, 2009 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

If you missed Part One of this installment, check it out here. Now, for Part Two:

Eddie Cicotte

This is the man that inspired this little project. Cicotte won 208 big league games before receiving a lifetime ban for his role in conspiring to throw the 1919 World Series as a member of the Chicago White Sox. Cicotte threw 18 innings and won one game as a member of the Detroit Tigers. He was born and passed away in the state of Michigan.

Nig Clarke

Clarke’s name is famous in baseball history for only one game…and it wasn’t even an official big league game. In 1902, while playing in the Texas League, Clarke reportedly went 8-8 in a single game with eight home runs. This is not an official statistic, but it’s certainly worth nothing. Clarke went 3-7 as a member of the 1905 Tigers and then moved on.

Vince Coleman

Coleman is best known as the last man to steal 100 bases in a single season, and as a real jerk. He was in the twilight of his career when he joined the Tigers in 1997. Coleman once stole 145 bases in a single minor league season and topped the 100 mark, three times as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals. In his time with the Tigers, Coleman went 1-14 (with 0 steals) before he was released in mid-April.

Francisco Cordero

Cordero is another recent player here. He spent his rookie season with the Tigers in 1999. He was then part of the blockbuster trade that brought Juan Gonzalez to Detroit. Gonzalez was a bust, and Cordero has since gone on to save 249 games as a big leaguer. In his only season with the Tigers he had a decent ERA, saved no games, and walked 18 batters in 19 innings of work.

Eric Davis

Davis was an All-Star before injuries slowed him down. A struggling Davis played 60 games for the Tigers in 1993 and 1994, hitting only nine home runs and hitting right around .200. After the 1994 season, Davis retired from baseball. He came back in 1996 and then was diagnosed with colon cancer. He rebounded and played for a few more years.

Larry Doby

Doby is best known as the first African-American to play in the American League, appearing with the Indians 11 weeks after Jackie Robinson debuted with the Dodgers. Doby drove in over 100 runs five times in his career and led the league in home runs twice. He played in 18 games for the Tigers in 1959, his last season in the majors. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1998 and passed away in 2003.

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