Tour De France 2016 Prize Money: Purse Payout Distribution for Final Standings

Tom Beck@@twjbeckContributor IJuly 24, 2016

2016 Tour de France winner Chris Froome of Britain celebrates as he crosses the finish line of the twenty-first stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 113 kilometers (70.2 miles) with start in Chantilly and finish in Paris, France, Sunday, July 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Peter Dejong/Associated Press

Team Sky's Chris Froome has won the 2016 Tour de France after a day of relaxation from Chantilly to the capital Paris on Sunday.

Per LeTour.com, the Englishman picked up €500,000 of the €2,295,850 total prize money after crossing the line down the Champs-Elysees comfortably ahead of his nearest challenger in the standings. 

Second place AG2R La Mondiale's Romain Bardet, who finished 4 minutes, 5 seconds behind in the General Classification, has collected €200,000 for his efforts over recent weeks. Individual stage winners will be buoyed with their €8,000 prize.

Read on for a full breakdown of the leaderboard and how Stage 21 unfolded:

Le Tour de France 2016 Prize Money
General Classification PositionRiderPrize Money
1stChris Froome€500,000
2ndRomain Bardet€200,000
3rdNairo Quintana€100,000
4thAdam Yates€70,000
5thRichie Porte€50,000
6thAlejandro Valverde€23,000
7thLouis Meintjes€11,500
8thDaniel Martin€7,600
9thRoman Kreuziger€4,500
10thJoaquin Rodriguez Oliver€3,800
LeTour.com

Recap

Froome enjoyed a calm run to the famed finish line on Sunday, grinning in the knowledge the hard work had already been completed. The gruelling and treacherous climbs and descents of Stage 20 had been masterfully navigated with the help of his team-mates ensuring the now three-time champion remained out of danger.

TOPSHOT - Great Britain's Christopher Froome, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey, is handed a glass of champagne as he rides during the 113 km twenty-first and last stage of the 103rd edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 24, 2016 bet
KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/Getty Images

In comparison to those difficulties high up in the mountains, Froome was handed a much simpler task on the final day's running with a largely flat 113-kilometre stroll to the race finish.

As traditional, the yellow, green, polka dot and white jersey holders begun the race at the front of the field. Froome, Tinkoff's Peter Sagan and Rafal Majka and Orica–BikeExchange's Adam Yates lead the pack away from the starting line, per Le Tour de France:

This year marks Froome's first attempt at winning the Tour without Richie Porte by his side—the rider who served as his super-domestique on both of his wins and for Bradley Wiggins' Tour win in 2012.

Froome performed admirably to manage the task in a controlled and measured fashion, ensuring he avoided significant danger throughout the Tour.

Per Eurosport, Froome dropped back to the team car to collect bottles of beers for his team-mates as the celebrations begun in earnest at the race start:

The Kenya-born cyclist would soon be back for more and this time took time to turn to the camera and lift a glass of Champagne and celebrate his achievements over the past few weeks:

Despite Froome enjoying the plaudits for his fine individual efforts and hard work, the 2012 Olympics Time Trial bronze medalist enjoyed a special moment with the nine members of his Team Sky companions:

Per CyclingNews.com, the 103rd edition of the Tour provided a bumper pay-packet in comparison to previous years. Winners of the green and polka dot jerseys in Paris will get €25,000. The best young rider collects €20,000, and each day in a special jersey nets €600.

Meanwhile, Stage winners each receive €11,000—a €3,000 increase from 12 months agoand all of the riders who finish will be paid €1,000, an increase from the former €400.

With 60 kilometres remaining until the race finish, Team Sky were in control of the peloton as the race skirted up the Arc de Triomphe for the first time. 

PARIS, FRANCE - JULY 24:  Chris Froome of Great Britain and Team Sky sprays a bottle of beer over his team mates during stage twenty one of the 2016 Le Tour de France, from Chantilly to Paris Champs-Elysees on July 24, 2016 in Paris, France.  (Photo by Ch
Chris Graythen/Getty Images

Per Whit Yost of Bicycling, the Stage and Tour finishes with nine laps of the Champs-Elysees, as traditional since 1975. The riders will race to the line in one of the most hotly contested field sprints in the sport, with retiring climbing legend Joaquin Rodriguez leading the pack after being brought to the front as part of the ongoing celebrations, per Le Tour:

Per the BBC, Froome's triumph sees him become just the eighth rider to win three Tour titles and the first to defend his title since Miguel Indurain in 1995. He wasn't going to win the final Stage of the 2016 event, however, after an eight-man breakaway.

Alexis Gougeard (AG2R-La Mondiale), Lawson Craddock (Cannondale-Drapac), Markus Burghardt (BMC), Daniel Teklehaimanot (DiData), Jeremy Roy (FDJ), Jan Barta (Bora), Rui Costa (Lampre-Merida) and Brice Feillu (Fortuneo-VitalConcept burst ahead of the pack to build a 19-second lead. But with 40 kilometres still ahead of them, there was still scope for another rider to enter the fray.

Great Britain's Christopher Froome (C), wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey and Colombia's Nairo Quintana (3Rd R) ride in the pack near the Arc de Triomphe (Arch of triumph) during the 113 km twenty-first and last stage of the 103rd edition of the
KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/Getty Images

Meanwhile for Etixx QuickStep's Marcel Kittel, three bike changes ended his victory chances, with the German throwing the second bike onto the ground in fury at the wheel replacement. 40 seconds behind, Kittel would have his work cut out to return to the peloton and rival the leaders.

Entering the final two laps, the breakaway group had been reeled back in by the peloton, with the sprinters preparing themselves for arguably the most exhilarating finish to any Stage in cycling. 

Germany's Andre Greipel waits for the start of the 146,5 km twentieth stage of the 103rd edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2016 between Megeve and Morzine-Avoriaz, French Alps. / AFP / KENZO TRIBOUILLARD        (Photo credit should re
KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/Getty Images

With the one-lap bell ringing in their ears, the riders thundered up the Champs-Elysees spread wide all across the street, with little order or formality. Mechanical problems denied Bryan Coquard's charge, but it was Lotto–Soudal's Andre Greipel who crossed the line first after a devastating late drive and burst. The German's raw power was enough to beat Team Katusha's Alexander Kristoff and hold off Peter Sagan's late rally.

Le Tour captured the enthralling race finish:

Meanwhile further back, Froome secured his second title in succession—his third overall—after crossing the line alongside his Sky team-mates to wrap up a dominant and deserved Tour victory.

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