Mexico Kit Change from Green to Black Leaves Supporters Baffled

Karla Villegas Gama@karlitsvFeatured ColumnistJanuary 30, 2015

Jun 6, 2014; Foxborough, MA, USA; The adidas jersey of Mexico midfielder Giovani Dos Santos (10) is seen against Portugal during the first half of an international friendly at Gillette Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Winslow Townson-USA TODAY Sports
USA TODAY Sports

As the first month of 2015 ends, a new Mexico kit arrives, and the fans are baffled.

The national team released images of El Tri's new home and away jerseys through their Twitter account, along with the message "History is written on the pitch."

Yes, forget about the traditional green kit, it's time to welcome a black shirt with grey stripes. The Mexican Football Federation logo is included in a fluorescent tone.

Then we have the white one, which is more traditional, but again, there's only a little bit of green in the logo and in the edge of the collar.

Adidas also reached out to the Mexico supporters with a video from the brand's newest campaign: There will be haters.

But it's not the first time the Mexican national team has worn colors other than green.

The Burgundy Era

When El Tri appeared in the first World Cup, held in Uruguay in 1930, the squad appeared with a burgundy shirt with dark blue shorts and socks.

The kit remained basically the same for almost 30 years. Mexico returned to the 1950 and 1954 World Cups with the same burgundy jerseys, but they changed the shorts and switched to burgundy socks.

It wasn't until the 1958 World Cup in Sweden that the squad became El Tri, adopting the green jersey as their first kit.

Mexico also wore burgundy in the 2002 World Cup, but it was their third kit.

Green, White and Red

From 1958 onward, the squad took the colors of the national flag, which instilled a sense of unity and patriotism. Meanwhile, the away kit was white.

The uniform went through transformations in the design and fabrics, but it was essentially the same: green with some details in white and red.

Perhaps the most controversial was the one Mexico used in Brazil 2014. The lightning-like pattern in the chest seemed odd, until some of Adidas' designers revealed it was inspired by a lucha libre mask, specifically Rey Mysterio's.

Polemic Uniforms

28 JUN 1994:  ALBERTO GARCIA ASPE OF MEXICO EVADES THE CHALLENGE OF BENARRIVO #3 OF ITALY  DURING THEIR 1994 WORLD CUP GAME AT RFK STADIUM IN WASHINGTON DC. THE GAME FINISHED TIED 1-1.     Mandatory Credit: Rick Stewart/ALLSPORT
Rick Stewart/Getty Images

In 1994 Mexico chose a flashy kit that included a pattern resembling red feathers. It was a bold move, but it didn't look great.

Perhaps one of the most surprising Mexico kits arrived in 2010, when El Tri used a black jersey as their second uniform.

It was the first time the squad wore a color other than green, red, white or burgundy, but it was well received by the fans. According to Mexican website MedioTiempo.com it was Adidas' fourth best-selling jersey that year.

Unfortunately, El Tri adopted a reddish-orange jersey as their away kit in 2014, which they used in World Cup warm-ups and competition.

This jersey substituted the black one.

The New Era

For many, it might not make sense that Mexico will be appearing with a black jersey in their home games. But in all fairness, it could be a good move to leave behind the failures and start a new era.

This is a key year for El Tri.

A new generation of players is developing at a rapid pace, two continental tournaments are at stake and the idea of bearing green in the heart ("El verde se lleva en el corazon") as the national team has targeted this move is probably an effort to make believe that the color of a jersey is just that, a color.

Related

    Salah and Virgil Back in Liverpool Training

    World Football logo
    World Football

    Salah and Virgil Back in Liverpool Training

    Andy Hunter
    via the Guardian

    The Rise of Arsenal's Pit Bull: Lucas Torreira

    World Football logo
    World Football

    The Rise of Arsenal's Pit Bull: Lucas Torreira

    Richard Fitzpatrick
    via Bleacher Report

    Roma Go for Mexico's Hector Herrera in January

    Mexico (National Football) logo
    Mexico (National Football)

    Roma Go for Mexico's Hector Herrera in January

    Football-italia
    via Football-italia

    Bale Trains with Real Madrid and Is Set to Face Levante

    World Football logo
    World Football

    Bale Trains with Real Madrid and Is Set to Face Levante

    J. I. García-Ochoa
    via MARCA in English