USC Football: The Top 50 Players in School History

Bill N@@Bill_N1Correspondent IOctober 19, 2011

USC Football: The Top 50 Players in School History

0 of 52

    The USC Trojans' storied football program has produced arguably the best football players of any college.

    USC has the most NFL draftees (477), first-round NFL draft picks (75), No. 1 NFL draft picks (five) and Pro Football Hall of Fame Inductees (11), as well as 162 Trojans selected to the NFL Pro Bowl, 29 College Football Hall of Fame players, 156 first-team All-Americans and six Heisman Trophy winners, resulting in 11 national championships.

    In 2008, the NFL Network selected USC as the No. 1 "football factory" in college football.

    This top 50 player list features the best USC football players in school history.

    It is not based on who is the best person, most likable or any criteria other than football talent and accomplishments on the field. It excludes current USC players.

    Players were selected and ranked from USC first-team All-Americans, the USC Athletic Hall of Fame, the College Football Hall of Fame, USC legends, Heisman Trophy winners, Trojan honorees, contributions to a USC national championship, Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees, an all-century Trojan team selected by fan vote published by The Orange County Register in 1999, Athlon Sports' all-time USC football team in 2001 and almost 50 years as a USC fan and alumnus.

    This resulted in a database of almost 200 football players. The list was reduced to 50 players and ranked based on achievements and awards earned by each player.

    There is consideration for each player’s pro career, but the USC accomplishments are more significant.

    It is not possible to prepare a list that everyone will agree on, and my sincere apologies to any great USC players either ranked inappropriately or missing from this list.

    Hopefully you will find this list entertaining and it brings back good memories. Much of the information about the players' accomplishments and statistics came from the 2011 USC Media Guide.

    Since the USC vs. Notre Dame game is Saturday, you might also enjoy this review and ranking of the top 25 games in the greatest intersectional rivalry in college football.

    Here is my humble attempt to identify the top 50 USC football players.

50. Jim Sears, LHB-S, 1951-52

1 of 52

    Jim Sears was one of USC’s top football players of the early 1950s and despite being just 5'9" and 164 pounds certainly was the top player in the West as a senior in 1952.

    A three-year letterman (1950-52) as a halfback and safety, he was a consensus All-American in 1952 when Troy won the conference title, finished fifth in the AP poll and beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl.

    In 1952, he led USC in passing (48 completions, 712 yards), total offense (1,030 yards), scoring (36 points) and punt returns (478 yards).

    Seventh in the 1952 Heisman Trophy voting, he won the Voit Trophy (given to the outstanding player on the Pacific Coast) and Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast) that season, as well as All-Conference first team honors. He was voted USC’s Most Inspirational Player as a senior and was selected to play in both the 1953 College All-Star Game and Hula Bowl.

    He also was USC’s kickoff return leader in 1950 (198 yards) and still is sixth on the school’s career punt return list (544 yards).

    He was picked in the sixth round of the 1953 NFL draft by the Colts and played for the Chicago Cardinals (1954, 1957-58), Los Angeles Chargers (1960) and Denver (1960-61).

    Heisman: Seventh place 1952

    First Team All-American: 1952; six teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2003

    Awards: Davis-Teschke (USC Most Inspirational Player), Voit Trophy (outstanding player on Pacific Coast), El Camino College Athletic Hall of Fame

    Highlights

    USC was 19-9-2 in his career and won the 1952 conference title; USC was fifth in the final AP poll in 1952. Played in 1953 Rose Bowl.

    Sears was USC’s leader in passing (48 completions, 712 yards), total offense (1030 yards), scoring (36 points) and punt returns (478 yards) in 1952. He was USC’s kickoff return leader in 1950 (198 yards) and is sixth on USC’s career punt return list (544 yards).

    Sears was drafted in the sixth round of the 1953 NFL draft by the Colts and played for the Chicago Cardinals (1954, 1957-58), Los Angeles Chargers (1960) and Denver (1960-61). Sears was a USC assistant coach in 1959.

    After USC and NFL, Sears was an automobile dealer.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD* PA PC PI PCT YDS TD P YDS AVG

    1950 70    318 4.6     4      1    0 — .000 0      0   13 404 31.1

    1951 26       89 3.4  —      6     1  2 .167 19    1    3  113 37.7

    1952 133   318 2.4   6   102 48   8 .470 712 8   16 560 35.0

    ALL   229    725 3.2 —   107 49 — .458 731 9   32 1077 33.7

    *Includes all TDs scored (not just rushing)

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1950 6      85    14.2  1   3    15     5.0 —     6     198 33.0 —

    1951 8    140    17.5  1   7    51     7.3 —     4       82 20.5 —

    1952 0        0       0.0  0  30 478   15.9 —    3       44 14.7 —

    ALL  14    225    16.1  2 42  544  12.9   3   13    324 24.9 —

    Interceptions

    Year INT YDS AVG TD

    1950 0 0 0.0 0

    1951 0 0 0.0 0

    1952 1 13 13.0 —

    ALL   1 13 13.0 —

49. Marvin Powell, OT, 1974-76

2 of 52

    Marvin Powell was a three-year starter and two-time All-American offensive tackle, helping USC win a national championship in 1974 and place second in 1976.

    He was drafted in the first round by the Jets and participated in the Pro Bowl five times.

    First Team All-American: 1975, 1976; four teams

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1994

    National Championship: 1974

    Highlights

    USC went 29-6-1 in his career. Powell was a member of USC’s 1974 national championship team, and USC was 17th in the final AP poll in 1975 and second in 1976. He played in the 1975 and 1977 Rose Bowls and the 1976 Liberty Bowl. He also played in the 1977 Hula Bowl and Japan Bowl. Powell was selected as a 1976 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Powell was drafted in the first round (fourth pick) of the 1977 NFL draft by the Jets and played for the Jets (1977-85) and Buccaneers (1986-87). He was in the Pro Bowl five times between 1977 and 1983.

    Son Marvin III was a fullback-tight end-safety for USC (1995-98) before playing for the Denver Broncos in 1999.

    After USC and NFL, Powell became an attorney. He was also elected president of the NFL players union.

48. Tim Rossovich, DE, 1965-67

3 of 52

    Tim Rossovich was an All-American DE, helping the Trojans win the 1967 NC and finish 10th in the 1965 final AP poll.

    He was drafted in the first round by the Eagles and played in the NFL until 1976 for three teams.

    Rossovich predated Ted Hendricks as a lunatic football player and personality in college and the NFL. He was famous for pranks that gained him money on bets, such as chewing glass and setting himself on fire. When I lived in Trojan Hall in 1968, there were rumors that he once anchored a chain of bodies from the second-floor window and then let go.

    First Team All-American: 1967; five teams

    National Championship: 1967

    Awards: USC’s Lineman of the Year Award in 1967

    Highlights

    USC was 24-7-1 in his career and won two conference titles; 1965 team was ranked 10th in the final AP poll and 1967 teams as NC. Rossovich played in two Rose Bowls (1967 and 1968) and kicked a PAT in the 1967 game. USC’s co-captain in 1967. He played in the 1968 Coaches All-America Game and College All-Star Game.

    He was drafted in the first round of the 1968 NFL draft by the Eagles and played for the Eagles (1968-71), Chargers (1972-73) and Oilers (1976).

    After USC and the NFL, he became an actor and stuntman.

47. Mort Kaer, Back, 1924-26

4 of 52

    Mort Kaer, one of USC's first great running backs, was Troy's second football All-American. He was the first USC back to break 100 yards in a game and was the national scoring leader in 1925.

    First Team All-American: 1926; nine teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1997

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1975

    Awards: Amateur Athletic Foundation Southern California Athlete of the Year in 1925

    Highlights

    Kaer was USC’s first consensus All-American (1926). USC was 28-6 in his career. He played in the 1925 Christmas Festival and first USC-Notre Dame game in 1926.

    Kaer was USC’s rushing and scoring leader in 1925 (576 yards, 114 points) and 1926 (852, 72). He led the nation in scoring in 1925. Kaer set a since-broken USC scoring record (216 points, all via rushing) and is 28th on USC’s career rushing list (1,588 yards). He had USC’s first 100-yard rushing game (183 yards at California in 1926). Kaer played in the 1928 East-West Shrine Game.

    Kaer was also on USC’s national championship 1926 track team and was fifth in the pentathlon in the 1924 Paris Olympics.

    He played professionally with Frankford in 1931. After USC, Kaer was a teacher and football coach at Weed (CA) High for 27 years.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD PA PC PI PCT YDS TD P YDS AVG

    1924  22   160 7.3     5    2   2   0  1.000 50 —  —  —  —

    1925 105 576 5.5    19  34   8  1   .235 170 —  —  —  —

    1926 155 852 5.5     12 31 18  6   .581 270 — 33 1202 36.4

    ALL   282 1588 5.7   36 67 28  7  .418  490 —  —  —  —

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD

    1924   4    

    1925   9  101    11.2  —   13   159 12.2 —   2   43   21.5  —

    1926   1    12    12.0  —     3      53 17.7 — 23 245  10.6  —

46. Chris Claiborne, LB, 1996-98

5 of 52

    Claiborne is the only Trojan to have won the Dick Butkus Award as the nation's best college linebacker.

    He was drafted in the first round by the Lions as a junior in 1999 and played for four NFL teams until 2006.

    First Team All-American: 1998; seven teams

    Awards: Dick Butkus (USC’s first in 1998), 1998 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year, USC MVP in 1998

    Highlights

    USC was 20-16 in his career. Claiborne was a USC captain in 1998. He led USC in interceptions in 1998 (six) and played in the 1998 Sun Bowl.

    Claiborne was drafted in the first round (ninth pick) of the 1999 NFL draft (as a junior) by the Lions and played for the Lions (1999-2002), Vikings (2003-04), Rams (2005) and Giants (2006).

    After USC and the NFL, he became a high school football coach.

    Tackles

    Year TAC LOSS/YDS DFL FR INT YDS AVG TD

    1996 116     4/8           7     1   2     34   17.0 0

    1997 76      16/84        0     1   0       0     0.0 0

    1998 120      7/23       16    0   6   159   26.5 2

    ALL   312    27/115     23    2   8   193   24.1 2

45. Hal Bedsole, LE, 1961-63

6 of 52

    One of the original “big” (6'5", 221 pounds) wide receivers in college football, Hal Bedsole was a consensus All-American on USC’s 1962 national championship team.

    A three-year letterman (1961-63) and two-time All-Conference first-teamer (1961-61), his 82 career catches rank in USC’s top 20 chart. He owns the USC career record for highest average per catch (30 or more) at 20.94.

    Nicknamed “Prince Hal” because of his self-assured, outspoken ways, he led the Trojans in receiving and scoring in 1961 (27 catches, 38 points) and 1962 (33 catches, 68 points).

    He was the first Trojan to have 200 receiving yards in a game (201 yards versus California in 1962, a school record which stood for 21 years). He caught two touchdown passes in USC’s win over Wisconsin in the 1963 Rose Bowl.

    A second-round draft pick of the Minnesota Vikings, he played there for three seasons (1964-66).

    First Team All-American: 1962; 10 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2001

    National Championship: 1962

    Highlights

    Bedsole played in the 1963 Rose Bowl, catching two touchdown passes. A two-time All-Conference first-teamer (1961-62), he played in the 1964 Coaches All-America Game, College All-Star Game and Hula Bowl. He was selected as a 1963 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Bedsole was USC’s receiving leader in 1961 (27 catches) and 1962 (33 catches) and scoring leader in 1961 (38 points) and 1962 (68 points). He owns the USC career record for highest average per catch (30 or more) at 20.94. Bedsole was the first Trojan to have 200 receiving yards in a game (201 yards versus California in 1962). He had five 100-yard receiving games in his career.

    Bedsole was drafted in the 1964 NFL draft by the Vikings (second round) and also in the AFL draft by the Chiefs (eighth round) and played for the Vikings from 1964-66. Nickname was "Prince Hal."

    After USC and NFL, he was a radio broadcast sales manager and in business marketing.

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS  AVG TD 2XP

    1961 27   525   19.4   6  1

    1962 33   827   25.1  11 1

    1963 22   365   16.6   3 0

    ALL    82   1717 20.9 20 2

44. Willie McGinest, LB, 1990-93

7 of 52

    Willie McGinest wore the number “55” as a Trojan linebacker and carried on the legacy of the jersey established by his predecessor, All-American linebacker Junior Seau.

    McGinest had 29 sacks and 48 tackles for loss in his USC career.

    He was drafted in 1994 by the New England Patriots and helped them win Super Bowls in 2001, 2003 and 2004. He left the Patriots in 2006 and joined the Cleveland Browns.

    Awards: 1993 Lombardi Award finalist

    Highlights

    McGinest earned all-conference honors three straight years and earned All-American acclaim. During his senior year (1993), he earned Playboy All-American and All-Pac-10 conference honors. He was a USC captain. He started every game at weakside defensive end for the Trojans. McGinest finished his collegiate career with 193 tackles (134 solos), 29 sacks (171 yards), 48 tackles for loss (238 yards) and 26 passes batted away.

    McGinest was drafted by the New England Patriots in the first round (fourth overall) of the 1994 NFL draft. He had been one of the cornerstones for New England's success in winning the Super Bowl in 2001, 2003, and 2004. He was nominated to the Pro Bowl twice, in 1996 and 2003.

    In the 2005 wild-card game (which the Pats won 28-3) against the Jacksonville Jaguars, he set an NFL postseason record by recording 4.5 sacks in one game, as well as breaking Bruce Smith's record for the most all-time sacks in the postseason with 16 currently. His 78 career sacks rank third all-time for the Patriots.

    The Patriots released the veteran linebacker on March 9, 2006 due to his salary. He signed with the Cleveland Browns, whose head coach, Romeo Crennel, was formerly the Patriots' defensive coordinator, in a three-year deal.

    He is very generous and established the Willie McGinest Freedom School in Long Beach, a program which aims to provide social and cultural enrichment for neighborhood youth.

    McGinest owns an entertainment company in Los Angeles called "55 Entertainment." McGinest and his childhood friend Snoop Dogg are also founders and co-owners of Icon Sports + Entertainment, a company geared toward helping athletes realize their potential in the entertainment industry.

43. Tim McDonald, S, 1983-86

8 of 52

    Tim McDonald was a great safety and All-American in 1985 and 1986; he was the USC MVP both years also. In 1986 he set the USC record for the longest run (99 yards) with an intercepted fumble against Baylor. He had 11 interceptions in his career.

    He was drafted in 1987 by the Cardinals and played in the NFL until 1999, including an appearance in Super Bowl XXIX.

    First Team All-American: 1985, 1986; seven teams

    Awards: USC’s MVP in 1985 and 1986, runner-up Jim Thorpe Award, Walter Camp All-Century Team

    Highlights

    USC was 26-20-1 in his career. USC was 10th in the final AP poll in 1984. Tim McDonald played in the 1985 Rose Bowl, 1985 Aloha Bowl and 1987 Citrus Bowl. He was a USC captain in 1986. McDonald was selected as a two-time All-Conference first-teamer (1985-86) and two-time (1985-86) Playboy Pre-Season All-American. He played in the 1986 East-West Shrine Game.

    McDonald tied for the USC lead in interceptions in 1985 (four) and is tied for 13th on USC's career interception list (11, including two intercepted fumbles). He owns the USC record for longest run with intercepted fumble (99 yards versus Baylor in 1986).

    McDonald was drafted in the second round of the 1987 NFL draft by the Cardinals and played for the Cardinals (1987-92) and 49ers (1993-99). He played in Super Bowl XXIX.

    Son,T.J. is a junior safety at USC.

    After USC and the NFL, he became a high school head coach.

    Tackles

    Year TAC LOSS/YDS DFL FR INT YDS AVG  TD

    1983   19      0/0          0     2    0       0     0.0 0

    1984   78      1/1         21    1    4     50   12.5 0

    1985 102    3/20         17    1    4    13     3.3  0

    1986 140    6/33         10    3    3   166   55.3 1

    ALL    339   10/54       48    7   11* 229  20.8 1

    *Includes two intercepted fumbles

42. John Ferraro, LT, 1943-47

9 of 52

    A two-time All-American tackle (1944-47), John Ferraro lettered for four years (1943-44, 1946-47) at USC during World War II at a time when four-year lettermen were rare.

    Regarded as one of USC's best-ever tackles, at 6'4" and 260 pounds he was one of the biggest players of his era.

    During his time, USC went 29-8-3 and played in three Rose Bowls. He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame and won the 1973 NCAA Silver Anniversary Award.

    First Team All-American: 1944, 1947; 15 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    Rose Bowl Hall of Fame: 1996

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1974

    Awards: NCAA Silver Anniversary Award in 1973

    Highlights

    USC was 30-8-3 in his career and won three conference titles. USC was seventh in the final AP poll in 1944 and eighth in 1947. Ferraro played in three Rose Bowls (1944-45-48). He was USC’s first three-time All-Conference first-teamer (1944-46-47) and played in the 1947 East-West Shrine Game.

    Ferraro was drafted in the sixth round of the 1946 NFL draft by the Packers.

    After USC, he became an insurance broker, police commissioner and longtime Los Angeles City Councilman.

41. Mike Williams, FL, 2002-03

10 of 52

    Mike Williams was a dominant 6'5" wide receiver for USC in the two years (freshman and sophomore) that he played before challenging the three-year rule and having to sit out 2004 for signing with an agent.

    He helped USC win the national championship in 2003 and finish with the AP No. 4 ranking in 2002. He was an eighth-place finisher in Heisman voting as a sophomore. In 2003 he had 95 catches, second in USC history.

    He was drafted in the first round of the 2005 draft by the Lions and is currently playing for the Seattle Seahawks. He had 65 receptions for 751 yards and two TDs in 2010.

    Heisman: Eighth place in 2003

    First Team All-American: 2003; nine teams

    National Championship: 2003

    Awards: Finalist for 2003 Biletnikoff Award, CBS Sportsline.com National Player of the Year in 2003

    Highlights

    USC was 23-3 in his two-year career. USC was fourth in the final AP poll in 2002 and won the NC in 2003. Williams played in the 2003 Orange Bowl and 2004 Rose Bowl and won USC's Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 2003. He was selected as 2003 Playboy Pre-Season All-American and was a Freshman All-American first-teamer and the Pac-10 Freshman of the Year in 2002.

    Williams set USC records for touchdown receptions in a career (30), season (16 in 2003) and game (three, which he did three times). In 2002, he set NCAA freshman season records for receiving yards (1,265) and TD catches (14), the Pac-10 freshman mark for catches (81) and the USC freshman game record for catches (13).

    He led USC in receiving in 2002 (81 catches, fifth in USC history) and 2003 (95 catches, second in USC history). He was sixth nationally in receptions (7.3, second in Pac-10) and 10th in receiving yards (101.1) in 2003. Williams ranks sixth on USC's career receptions list (176 catches). He had 12 100-yard receiving games and 10 eight-reception games in his career.

    Williams sat out the 2004 season while ruled ineligible by the NCAA for signing with an agent. He was drafted in the first round of the 2005 draft by the Lions and played for the Lions (2005-06), Raiders (2007), Titans (2007) and Seahawks (2010-present)

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD TCB YDS AVG TD PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    2002  81 1265 15.6 14    2      9     4.5   0    1   1    0 1.000 19 0

    2003 95  1314 13.8 16    3   26     8.7   0     2  2     0 1.000 38 1

    ALL 176  2579 14.7 55    5    35    7.0   0     3   3     0 1.000 57 1

40. Paul McDonald, QB, 1976-79

11 of 52

    Paul McDonald was a left-handed quarterback who led USC to a NC in 1978 and second place in 1979 before being named an All-American in 1979. USC was 31-5-1 in his career, including the 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls and the 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl. He was also a 1979 Academic All-American first-teamer.

    He was drafted by the Browns in 1980 and played in the NFL until 1987, finishing with the Cowboys.

    Heisman: Sixth place 1979

    First Team All-American: 1979; one team

    National Championship: 1978

    Awards: USC’s MVP in 1979, USC’s Player of the Game versus Notre Dame Award in 1978, USC’s Gloomy Gus Henderson Award (most minutes played) in 1979, USC’s Football Alumni Club Award (highest grade point average) in 1978, NCAA Today’s Top Six Award in 1979, Recipient of NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship in 1979, 1979 National Football Foundation Scholar-Athlete, 1979 Academic All-American first-teamer

    Highlights

    USC went 31-5-1 in his career. USC was 13th in the final AP poll in 1977, second in 1979 and won the NC in 1978. McDonald played in the 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls and the 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl. He also played in the 1980 Hula Bowl.

    McDonald was USC’s passing leader in 1978 (115 completions) and 1979 (164 completions, 19th-best in USC history) and USC’s total offense leader in 1979 (2,149 yards). He ranks 11th on USC’s career passing list (299 completions). He ranks 14th on USC’s career total offense list (3,877 yards) and had six 200-yard passing games in his career (including since-broken USC record 380 yards versus Arizona in 1979). He led the Pac-10 in passing in 1978 (151.5 average).

    McDonald was drafted in the fourth round of the 1980 NFL draft by the Browns and played for the Browns (1980-85) and Cowboys (1986-87).

    Son Michael was a quarterback for USC (2005-07).

    After USC and NFL, he became an investment banker, business marketing company owner and has been an award-winning radio analyst on USC football games since 1998.

    Passing

    Year  PA PC     PI   PCT  YDS TD TCB YDS AVG TD

    1976     7  3      0   .429   34    0    2     -5   -2.5   0

    1977   27 17     0  .630  191   0    5     -5   -1.0   0

    1978  203 115 7 .567 1690 19  52  -177  -3.4  0

    1979 264 164  6 .621 2223 18  34    -74  -2.2  0

    ALL  501 299  13 .597 4138 37 93  -261  -2.8  0

39. Keyshawn Johnson, WR, 1994-95

12 of 52

    Keyshawn Johnson is one of the most prolific wide receivers in USC history. He played extremely well in key games and was the MVP in the 1995 Cotton Bowl and 1996 Rose Bowl and is in the Hall of Fame for both bowls.

    He had 102 catches in 1995, most in USC history.

    Known to be brash and outspoken, Johnson was chosen by the New York Jets as the No. 1 pick of the 1996 NFL draft. He played for four NFL teams until he retired in 2006 and played in Super Bowl XXXVII.

    Heisman: Seventh place, 1995

    First Team All-American: 1995; 10 teams

    Awards: 1995 Cotton Bowl Offensive MVP, 1996 Rose Bowl MVP, 1995 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), 1995 Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year, 1995 USC’s MVP, USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1995, Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 2008, Cotton Bowl Hall of Fame in 2007

    Highlights

    USC was 17-5-2 in his career. USC was 13th in the final AP poll in 1994 and 12th in 1995. Keyshawn Johnson played in the 1995 Cotton Bowl and 1996 Rose Bowl. He was selected as a 1995 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Johnson led USC in receiving in 1994 (66 catches, tied for 12th in USC history) and 1995 (102 catches, most in USC history). He led the Pac-10 in receptions (8.2 average) in 1995 and in receiving yards in 1994 (114.0 average) and 1995 (110.7 average). Johnson led USC in scoring in 1995 (42 points).

    He ranks seventh on USC’s career receiving list (168 catches) and set two USC career receiving records, two USC season receiving records and one USC single-game record. He had 17 100-yard receiving games and 12 eight-reception games in his career.

    Johnson was chosen by the New York Jets as the No. 1 pick of the 1996 NFL draft. He played for the Jets (1996-99), Buccaneers (2000-03), Cowboys (2004-05) and Panthers (2006). He played in Super Bowl XXXVII.

    He now is a television sports commentator, businessman, restaurateur and real estate investor.

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1994 66  1362 20.6  9   1       22 22.0  0

    1995 102 1434 14.1 7   1       17 17.0  0

    ALL   168 2796 16.6 16 2       39 19.5  0

38. Pat Haden, QB, 1972-74

13 of 52

    Pat Haden exemplified the term “student-athlete.” Not only was he one of USC’s most productive quarterbacks, but he starred in the classroom as well.

    A three-time letterman (1972-74), he led the Trojans in passing in 1973 and 1974 (and in total offense in 1973). He was a member of USC’s 1972 and 1974 national championship teams and played in three Rose Bowls.

    He was co-MVP of the 1975 Rose Bowl (with lifelong friend J.K. McKay) when he threw for 181 yards and two scores, including a TD pass and PAT pass late in the game, for a comeback win over Ohio State. He was inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1995.

    A Rhodes Scholar, he was a two-time Academic All-American (1973-74).

    A seventh-round pick of the Los Angeles Rams in the 1975 NFL draft, he played for the Rams from 1976 to 1981 while also attending Oxford.

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2003

    National Championship: 1972, 1974

    Awards: Co-MVP of the 1975 Rose Bowl (with lifelong friend J.K. McKay), Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1995, 1974 USC MVP, 1974 NCAA Post-Graduate Scholar, 1974 NCAA Today’s Top Six Award winner, 1974 National Football Foundation Scholar-Athlete, GTE Academic All-American Hall of Fame in 1988, NCAA Silver Anniversary Award in 2000

    Highlights

    Pat Haden was a three-time letterman (1972-74);, he led the Trojans in passing in 1973 and 1974 (and in total offense in 1973). He played in three Rose Bowls. A Trojan co-captain in 1974, he was named the team’s MVP that season and was selected to play in the 1975 Hula Bowl. He still ranks 10th on USC’s career passing list (241 completions) and 11th in total offense (3,802 yards).

    After USC and the NFL, he became an attorney, successful Los Angeles businessman and football broadcast journalist, including Notre Dame games, and is currently the USC athletic director.

37. Aaron Rosenberg, G, 1931-33

14 of 52

    Aaron Rosenberg, a two-time (1932-33) All-American first-teamer, was a devastating blocker as a pulling guard in Howard Jones' single-wing system. He helped USC win national championships in 1931 and 1932. He never lost to Notre Dame (3-0).

    First Team All-American: 1932, 1933; nine teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1997

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1966

    National Championship: 1931, 1932

    Highlights

    USC was 30-2-1 in his career. Rosenberg played in two Rose Bowls (1932-33). He was a member of the first USC team to beat Notre Dame in South Bend (1931). USC had a 27-game unbeaten streak and 25-game winning streak during his career. He never lost to Notre Dame (3-0). Rosenberg played in the 1934 College All-Star Game.

    After USC, Rosenberg was a television and movie producer and director.

36. Irvine "Cotton" Warburton, QB, 1932-34

15 of 52

    As a 5'6", 145-pound tailback, Irvine "Cotton" Warburton was one of the most elusive running backs in USC football history.

    A 1933 All-American who lettered three years at Troy (1932-34), he led USC in rushing in 1932 (420 yards) and 1933 (885 yards). He played on one of USC's greatest football teams, the undefeated 1932 national champions. He received the nickname "Cotton" because of his blond hair. He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

    First Team All-American: 1933; 10 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1975

    National Championship: 1932

    Highlights

    USC was 24-7-2 in his career. Warburton played in the 1933 Rose Bowl, scoring two touchdowns, and in the 1935 College All-Star Game and East-West Shrine Game. He was USC’s leading rusher in 1932 (420 yards) and 1933 (885), and leading scorer in 1933 (72 points). Warburton ranks 39th on USC’s career rushing list (1,357 yards).

    Warburton was on USC’s 1933 track team and is a member of the U.S. Softball Hall of Fame.

    His nickname “Cotton” came from his towheaded appearance.

    After USC, Warburton was an Oscar-winning film editor (Mary Poppins).

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD* PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1932 115 420 3.7     8      12 2   0 .167  36   —

    1933 149 885 5.9    12     18 7   3 .389 106 —

    *Includes all TDs scored (not just rushing)

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1932 3       28  9.3    — 21 357  17.0  —   5     100  20.0 —

    1933 4        81 20.3  — 15 121   8.1   —   1       24  24.0 —

    Interceptions

    Year INT YDS AVG TD P YDS AVG

    1932 3 87 9.0 —     18   640   35.6

    1933 0 0 0.0 0         10   274   27.4

35. Ernie Smith, T, 1930-32

16 of 52

    Ernie Smith, one of the top tackles of his era, earned 1932 unanimous All-American first team honors, first in USC history. He helped USC win national championships in 1931 and 1932, and the Trojans were 28-3 in his career.

    Besides his talent on the football field, he also played trombone in the Trojan band (he continued to play in public throughout his life).

    First Team All-American: 1932; 10 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1997

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1970

    National Championship: 1931, 1932

    Highlights

    Ernie Smith was USC’s first unanimous All-American. USC was 28-3 in his career. He played in two Rose Bowls (1932-33). Smith was a member of the first USC team to beat Notre Dame in South Bend (1931).

    Smith coached the Trojan freshman footballers in 1933 and 1934.

    He played professionally with Green Bay in 1935-37 and 1939.

    After USC and the NFL, Smith was a life insurance underwriter and played trombone in a dance band.

34. Harry Smith, LG-DL, 1937-39

17 of 52

    Harry Smith was a teenager when he saw a movie of the highlights of USC’s 16-14 upset of Notre Dame in 1931. He said this made him dream of playing for Southern California. He realized his dream by enrolling in 1936 and was the freshman football captain.

    Smith was a 1938 and 1939 All-American on back-to-back Rose Bowl teams. An agile pulling guard, he was known as "Blackjack" for the cast he wore on one hand in the 1939 season. He lettered at Troy three years (1937-39).

    He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1955. He played in the NFL in 1940 and then was a football coach, including two years (1949-50) as an assistant at USC.

    First Team All-American: 1938, 1939; 13 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1999

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1955

    National Championship: 1939

    Highlights

    USC was 21-6-4 in his career and won two conference titles. USC was seventh in the final AP poll in 1938 and the national champion in 1939. Smith played in two Rose Bowls (1939-40) and in the 1940 College All-Star Game.

    Smith’s nickname was “Blackjack.”

    He also played rugby at USC (1938-39).

    Smith was a USC assistant coach in 1949-50.

    He was drafted in the fifth round of the 1940 NFL draft by the Detroit Lions and played with Detroit in 1940.

    After USC and the NFL, Smith coached at Missouri and with the Saskatchewan Roughriders.

33. Erny Pinckert, B, 1929-31

18 of 52

    Erny Pinckert was a two-time All-American (1930-31), USC's second ever, and three-time letterman (1929-31).

    As a blocking back, he scored two touchdowns in the 1932 Rose Bowl. During his time at Troy, the Trojans went 28-5, won the 1931 national championship and won two Rose Bowls.

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame. He played in the NFL from 1932-40.

    First Team All-American: 1930, 1931; 13 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1957

    National Championship: 1931

    Awards: MVP of the 1932 Rose Bowl, USC’s Davis-Teschke (Most Inspirational Player) Award in 1931, Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1997

    Highlights

    USC was 28-5 in his career and won two conference titles. Pinckert played in two Rose Bowls (1930-32), scoring three touchdowns. He was a member of the first USC team to beat Notre Dame in South Bend (1931).

    Pinckert played professionally with the Boston Braves (1932) and Boston-Washington Redskins (1933-40).

    After USC, he owned a clothes designing business.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD PA PC PI PCT YDS TD P YDS AVG

    1929  44 169     3.8 —   7 4 1         .571 29 — 7 181 25.9

    1930  17 199    11.6— — — — — — — — — —

    1931 54  383      7.1 — — — — — — — — — —

    ALL    115 751 6.5 — — — — — — — — — —

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1929 5     56    11.2  —  —   —    —    —  1       19  19.0 —

    1930 2     42    21.0  —   2    23   11.5 — 2        50 25.0  —

    1931 10   120 12.0   — —   —    —      — 5      107 21.4 —

    ALL   17   218 12.8    — —  —    —       — 8      176 22.0 —

    Interceptions

    Year INT YDS AVG TD

    1929 1 0   0.0 —

    1930 — — — —

    1931 5 65 13.0 —

    ALL  — — — —

32. Raymond “Tay” Brown, T, 1930-32

19 of 52

    Tay Brown was a dominant offensive tackle and captain of USC’s undefeated 1932 team. He also helped win the 1931 national championship.

    He also helped the 1931 track team win a national title.

    First Team All-American: 1932; one team

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1997

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1980

    National Championship: 1931, 1932

    Awards: USC’s Davis-Teschke (Most Inspirational Player) Award in 1932

    Highlights

    USC was 28-3 in his career. Brown played in two Rose Bowls (1932-33) and was a member of the first USC team to beat Notre Dame in South Bend (1931). Brown was USC’s team captain in 1932 and a USC assistant coach in 1941.

    Brown was a member of the 1931 and 1933 USC track teams (the 1931 team won the NCAA title).

    After USC he was an assistant football coach and head basketball coach at Cincinnati and head football coach and athletic director at Compton Junior College.

31. Mark Carrier, S, 1987-89

20 of 52

    Mark Carrier is USC’s only Thorpe Award winner, a trophy he won in 1989 as the nation’s top defensive back. Known for his ferocious hitting and keen ball-hawking, he was a two-time (1988-89) All-American and All-Pac-10 first team safety.

    He intercepted 13 passes in his career, including seven in 1989 to lead the Pac-10.

    The three-year letterman (1987-89) left USC after his junior season and was the sixth pick of the 1990 NFL draft, chosen by the Chicago Bears. He played 11 years in the NFL with the Bears (1990-96), Detroit Lions (1997-99) and Washington Redskins (2000). He was the NFL’s 1990 Defensive Rookie of the Year and was a three-time Pro Bowler.

    First Team All-American: 1988, 1989; eight teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2007

    Awards: 1989 Jim Thorpe (first time for USC player), USC’s Defensive Player of the Game versus Notre Dame Award in 1989, USC’s Defensive Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1987 and 1989

    Highlights

    USC was 27-8-1 in his career. USC was 18th in the final AP poll in 1987, seventh in 1988 and eighth in 1989. Carrier played in the 1987 Citrus Bowl and the 1988, 1989 and 1990 Rose Bowls. He was selected as a 1989 Playboy Pre-Season All-American. Carrier led USC in interceptions in 1989 (seven) and the Pac-10 in interceptions in 1989 (0.64). He is tied for sixth on USC’s career interception list (13).

    Carrier’s nickname was Aircraft.

    He was drafted in the first round (sixth pick) of the 1990 NFL draft (as a junior) by the Bears and played for the Bears (1990-96), Lions (1997-99) and Redskins (2000).

    After USC and NFL, Carrier became a radio sports commentator and a college and pro football assistant coach (Arizona State, Baltimore Ravens and New York Jets).

    Year TAC LOSS/YDS DFL FR INT YDS AVG TD

    1987   115      3/9        7     3    4     54 13.5  0

    1988   114      0/0      17     0    2     23 11.5  0

    1989   107     8/12       3     1    7     58   8.3  0

    ALL  336      11/21    27   4    13    135 10.4  0

30. Brad Budde, OG, 1976-79

21 of 52

    Brad Budde was USC’s first Lombardi Award winner in 1979 when he won consensus All-American honors.

    A four-year starting offensive guard (1976-79), he was the first freshman footballer to start a USC season opener since World War II. He was a key member of Troy’s 1978 national championship squad and played in four bowl games (the 1977, 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls and the 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl). A three-time All-Conference first-teamer (1977-78-79), in 1979 he also was the runner-up for the Outland Trophy.

    Also a fine student, he received an NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship in 1979. He was inducted into the National Football Foundation College Hall of Fame in 1998.

    He was the 11th pick of the 1980 NFL draft by the Kansas City Chiefs and played seven seasons (1980-86) for the Chiefs, where his father, Ed, was an All-Pro lineman before him.

    First Team All-American: 1979; seven teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2001

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1998

    National Championship: 1978

    Awards: 1979 Lombardi (USC first ever), runner-up for 1979 Outland Trophy, USC’s Offensive Player of the Year Award in 1979, USC’s Davis-Teschke Award (Most Inspirational Player) in 1979, Recipient of NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship in 1979

    Highlights

    USC went 42-6-1 in his career. USC was second in the final AP poll in 1976, 13th in 1977, second in 1979 and won the national championship in 1978. Budde played in the 1977, 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls and 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl. He was the first freshman to start a USC season opener since World War II. Budde played in 1980 Hula Bowl and Japan Bowl. He was selected as a 1979 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    The son of ex-Kansas City Chiefs All-Pro Ed Budde, Brad followed his father there as the Chiefs’ first- round (11th overall) draft pick in 1980 and played there until 1986.

    After USC and the NFL, Budde became a physical therapist.

29. Keith Van Horne, OT, 1977-80

22 of 52

    Keith Van Horne was a great All-American offensive tackle who helped USC win the 1978 national championship and finish second in 1979.

    He was selected in the first round of the 1981 NFL draft by the Bears and played with them until 1993, including Super Bowl XX.

    First Team All-American: 1980; six teams

    National Championship: 1978

    Awards: USC’s Offensive Player of the Year Award in 1980, USC’s Offensive Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1980

    Highlights

    USC went 39-7-2 in his career. USC was 13th in the final AP poll in 1977, second in 1979, 11th in 1980 and won the NC in 1978. Van Horne played in the 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls and 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl. He was a USC captain in 1980. Van Horne played in the 1981 Hula Bowl. He was selected as a 1980 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Van Horne was drafted in the first round (11th pick) of the 1981 NFL draft by the Bears and played for the Bears (1981-93). He played in Super Bowl XX.

    After USC and the NFL, Van Horne became a radio broadcaster.

28. Marlin McKeever, RE-FB, 1958-60

23 of 52

    Half of USC's Marvelous McKeever twins, Marlin was a two-time All-American end (1959-60) and three-year letterman (1958-60) for the USC football team.

    He was a 1960 Academic All-American. He also lettered twice in track (1959-60).

    He played 13 years in the NFL (1961-73).

    First Team All-American: 1959, 1960; five teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    Awards: USC’s Lineman of the Year Award in 1960, USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA in 1960, 1959 Academic All-American first-teamer

    Highlights

    The 1959 team went 8-2 and was 14th in the final AP poll. McKeever played in the 1960 East-West Shrine Game and 1961 College All-Star Game and Hula Bowl. He was USC’s first Playboy Pre-Season All-American (in 1960, along with twin Mike).

    McKeever was USC’s receiving leader in 1959 (nine catches) and 1960 (15 catches) and USC’s punting leader in 1958 (670 yards) and 1960 (1,444 yards).

    McKeever was drafted in the 1961 by the NFL Rams (first round) and also in the AFL draft by the Chargers (third round) and played for the Los Angeles Rams (1961-66 and 1971-72), Minnesota Vikings (1967), Washington Redskins (1968-70) and Philadelphia Eagles (1973).

    McKeever was also was on USC’s 1959 track team (shot put and discus). His twin brother, Mike, was a left guard for USC (1958-60).

    After USC and NFL, McKeever became a stockbroker and insurance executive.

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD P YDS AVG TAC FR DFL

    1958 6     105  17.5   1  19 670 35.3 71    2   2

    1959 9     107  11.9   0    0    0     0.0 66   33  4

    1960 15   218  14.5   1  39 1444 37.0 — — —

    ALL    30   430  14.3   2  58 2114 36.4 — — —

    Kickoff Returns

    Year KOR YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD TCB YDS AVG TD

    1958 2        14     7.0  0    6    23   3.8     0   0   0   0.0    0

    1960 1         7      7.0  0     0     0 0.0       0   4   26  6.5   —

    CAREER 3  21      7.0  0     6    23 3.8     0   4   26  6.5   —

27. Junior Seau, OLB, 1988-89

24 of 52

    Junior Seau was one of the most exciting and dominant linebackers in USC and pro football history. He helped popularize the No. 55 jersey now worn often by USC's top linebacker.

    USC was 19-4-1 in his career and in the Top 10 both years.

    He was a dominating LB in the NFL from 1990 to 2009, playing in Super Bowl XXIX and XLII and making 12 Pro Bowls.

    First Team All-American: 1989; one team

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2009

    Awards: 1989 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year, USC’s MVP in 1989, USC’s Defensive Player of the Year Award in 1989

    Highlights

    USC was 19-4-1 in his career and was seventh in the final AP poll in 1988 and eighth in 1989. Seau played in the 1989 and 1990 Rose Bowls.

    He was drafted in the first round (fifth pick) of the 1990 NFL draft (as a junior) by the Chargers and played for the Chargers (1990-2002), Dolphins (2003-05) and Patriots (2006-09). Seau played in Super Bowl XXIX and XLII. He played in 12 Pro Bowls.

    After USC and the NFL, Seau became a restaurant owner.

26. Jon Arnett, LHB, 1954-56

25 of 52

    Known as “Jaguar Jon” because of his outstanding agility, Jon Arnett was a 1955 consensus All-American back at USC as a junior and noted punt/kickoff returner.

    He finished 10th in the 1956 Heisman voting after losing half the season based on an accusation that he and other players took money. However, it was a conference-approved program, but the NCAA decided to penalize him anyway. He was probably the best player in the country in 1956.

    Arnett was drafted in the first round by the Rams in 1957 and played until 1966, finishing with the Chicago Bears. He was selected to the 1959 All-Pro backfield and played in the Pro Bowl six times.

    Heisman: 10th place, 1956

    First Team All-American: 1955; three teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1994

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2001

    Awards: 1955 and 1956 Voit Trophy (given to the outstanding player on the Pacific Coast), 1956 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast)

    Highlights

    USC was 22-10 in his career. USC was 17th in the final AP poll in 1954, 13th in 1955 and 18th in 1956. Arnett played in the 1955 Rose Bowl. He was USC’s team co-captain in 1956. Arnett played in the 1957 College All-Star Game, East-West Shrine Game and Hula Bowl.

    He was USC’s rushing leader in 1954 (601 yards) and 1955 (672 yards). Arnett was also USC’s total offense leader (822 yards) and kickoff return leader (418 yards) in 1955. He was USC’s scoring leader in 1954 (55 points), 1955 (108 points, tops in the conference) and 1956 (43 points).

    Arnett was USC’s punt return leader in 1954 (129 yards) and 1955 (282 yards). He was USC’s interception leader in 1954 (three interceptions). Arnett is ranked 18th on USC’s career rushing list (1,898 yards), 10th on USC’s career punt return list (430 yards) and 15th on USC’s kickoff return list (628 yards).

    Nickname was “Jaguar Jon.”

    Arnett also was on USC track team (1954-55-56), placing second in the long jump at the 1954 NCAA meet (USC won the NCAA team title in 1954 and 1955).

    Arnett was drafted in the first round of the 1957 NFL draft by the Rams and played for the Rams (1957-63) and Chicago Bears (1964-66). He still holds the Rams record for the longest kickoff return (105 yards).

    He was selected to the 1959 All-Pro backfield and played in the Pro Bowl six times.

    After USC and NFL, Arnett worked in the sales and marketing, real estate, development, stock brokerage, executive search, advertising, mortgage banking and investment counseling industries.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD* 1XP FG PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1954   96 601   6.3    9       1      0 30 17  2 .567 164 0

    1955 141 672    4.8  15     18     0 25 12 2 .480 150 0

    1956   99 625     6.3   6       7      0 11  8  1 .727 133 1

    ALL   336 1898 5.7 30 26      0 66 37 5 .561 447 1

    *Includes all TDs scored (not just rushing)

    Punt Returns

    Year PR YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD INT YDS AVG TD

    1954 11 129 11.7 —      6      70 11.7  — 3      54    18.0 —

    1955 16 282 17.6  1     15    418 27.    9  0       0    0 0.0   0

    1956   2  26   13.0  0      4     121 30.2 0   0      0     0.0    0

    ALL    29 437 15.1 1 26    628 24.2 — 3    54     18.0 —

25. Johnny Baker, G-PK, 1929-31

26 of 52

    Johnny Baker provided one of the most dramatic moments in the early era of USC football. He kicked a 33-yard field goal with 1:00 remaining in the game to give USC a 16-14 victory at Notre Dame in 1931 (Troy's first-ever win in South Bend), snapping the Irish's 26-game unbeaten streak and propelling the Trojans to the national championship.

    Upon its return to Los Angeles, USC was greeted by a crowd of several hundred thousand Angelenos in a downtown ticker-tape parade.

    Baker, a three-year letterman (1929-31) who played on two victorious Rose Bowl teams (1929 and 1931), also was a highly regarded guard who earned All-American first team honors as a 1931 senior.

    First Team All-American: 1931; nine teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1997

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1983

    National Championship: 1931

    Highlights

    USC was 28-5 in his career and won two conference titles. Baker played in two Rose Bowls (1930-32), kicking five PATs.

    After USC, Baker was the head football coach at Iowa State Teacher's College (now Northern Iowa), Omaha (now Nebraska-Omaha), Denver, Sacramento State and Sacramento City College, plus the athletic director at Sacramento State.

24. Dennis Smith, S, 1977-80

27 of 52

    Dennis Smith, Ronnie Lott and Joey Browner were one of college football’s greatest defensive backfields.

    Smith had 16 interceptions and 205 tackles for his career and was a 1980 All-American. He helped the Trojans win the 1978 national championship.

    Smith was one of the most feared and hardest-hitting safeties in the NFL from 1981 to 1994 with the Denver Broncos. He played in six Pro Bowls, played in Super Bowl XXI, XXII and XXIV and was named an All-Pro four times.

    First Team All-American: 1980

    National Championship: 1978

    Highlights

    Smith played in two Rose Bowls for the Trojans and helped win the 1978 NC.

    He lettered three times in track for the Trojans as well.

    Smith was drafted by the Denver Broncos in 1981 and played until 1994. His name is prominently displayed in Sports Authority Mile High Stadium in the Ring of Fame along with other great Broncos players.

    Since USC and the NFL, Smith manages properties in southern California and supports Make-a-Wish Foundation and Covenant House.

23. Morley Drury, QB-DB, 1927-29

28 of 52

    Known as "The Noblest Trojan of Them All," Morley Drury was USC's first 1,000-yard rusher (gaining a then-unheard of 1,163 yards in 1927). It took 38 years for a Trojan footballer to repeat that performance.

    A three-year letterman back (1925-27) and the 1927 team captain, Drury earned All-American honors in 1927. He received a 10-minute standing ovation in the Coliseum in his last game as a Trojan (against Washington in 1927), when he gained 180 yards and scored three touchdowns.

    He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. A versatile athlete, he also lettered in water polo, ice hockey and basketball at USC.

    First Team All-American: 1927; 10 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1954 (USC’s first inductee)

    National Championship: 1928

    Awards: USC’s Davis-Teschke (Most Inspirational Player) Award in 1927, Named the Amateur Athletic Foundation Southern California Athlete of the Year in 1927

    Highlights

    USC was 27-5-1 in his career. Drury played in the first USC-Notre Dame game (1926). He was USC’s team captain in 1927. Drury led USC in rushing in 1927 (1,163 yards, 18th on USC’s season rushing list), becoming the first Trojan to run for 1,000 yards (a feat not repeated until 1965). He was the first Trojan to run for 200 yards in a game (203 yards versus California in 1927). Drury ranks 26th on USC’s career rushing list (1686 yards). He led USC in scoring in 1927 (76 points).

    Nickname was “The Noblest Trojan of Them All.”

    Drury also played hockey (1925-27-28) and basketball (1927) at USC.

    After USC, Drury was an investment broker, real estate agent, advertising officer and building materials executive.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD* 1XP 2XP PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1925   59 321 5.4      9     32   —     22 14 1 .636 208 —

    1926   35 202 5.7      3        — 2       1   0   1 .000   0    0

    1927 223 1163 5.2   11    10  —     19  8   3 .421 77  —

    ALL 317 1686  5.3    23    —   —     42 22  5 .524 285 —

    *Includes all TDs scored (not just rushing)

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1925 21   381 18.1   6   —  —   —      —    4     82   20.5 —

    1926   5     75  15.0  —   3   33 11.0    —   3     33   11.0 —

    1927   2     64  32.0  —  17 118 6.9     —   4     86   21.5 —

    ALL    28   520 18.6   — —   —   —      — 11   201  18.3  —

    Interceptions

    Year INT YDS AVG TD P YDS   AVG

    1925  3     5      1.7  — 25 824   33.0

    1926  —   —     —    — 7 165    23.6

    1927  7    79    11.3 — 22 696  31.6

    ALL   —   —    —     —  54 1685 31.2

22. Dennis Thurman, S-FL, 1974-77

29 of 52

    Dennis Thurman was a two-time All-American who helped USC win the 1974 NC and was the USC MVP in 1977.

    Thurman was drafted by the Cowboys in 1978 and played in the NFL until 1986, finishing with the Cardinals. He played in Super Bowl XIII.

    First Team All-American: 1976, 1977; nine teams

    National Championship: 1974

    Awards: USC’s MVP in 1977, USC’s Defensive Player of the Year Award in 1977

    Highlights

    USC went 37-10-1 in his career. After winning the NC in 1974, USC was 17th in the final AP poll in 1975, second in 1976, 13th in 1977 and the national champion in 1974. Thurman played in the 1975 and 1977 Rose Bowls, 1975 Liberty Bowl and 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl. He was a two-time All-Conference first-teamer (1976-77). Thurman played in the 1978 Senior Bowl. He was selected as a 1977 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Thurman led USC in interceptions in 1976 (eight, tops in the Pac-8) and in punt returns (68 yards). He is tied for sixth on USC’s career interception list (13, including two intercepted fumbles).

    Thurman was drafted in the 11th round of the 1978 NFL draft by the Cowboys and played with the Cowboys (1978-85) and Cardinals (1986). He played in Super Bowl XIII.

    After USC and the NFL, Thurman became an assistant football coach with the NFL’s Phoenix Cardinals, Baltimore Ravens and New York Jets, World League’s Ohio Glory and at USC (1993-2000).

    Brother Junior was a defensive back for USC (1985-86).

    Interceptions

    Year INT YDS AVG TD REC YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD

    1974  2     98    49.0 1    0      0     0.0    0    10 68    6.8  0

    1975   0      0     0.0  0     3     55  18.3    0    11 25   2.3  0

    1976   8   170  21.3  1    0    0      0.0      0    17 68   4.0  0

    1977   3      37 12.3  0    0     0     0.0      0     0    0    0.0  0

    ALL    13*  305 23.5 2    3    55    18.3    0   38 161  4.2  0

    *includes 2 intercepted fumbles

    Kickoff Returns

    Year KOR YDS AVG TD TCB YDS AVG TD TAC DFL FR

    1974    4    46    11.5  0    4     23    5.8    0    0      0    0

    1975    1    26    26.0  0    3     38   12.7   0   12    1     0

    1976    0      0     0.0    0    0      0    0.0     0   80    4     4

    1977    0      0     0.0    0    0      0    0.0     0   77    6     0

    ALL      5     72   14.4   0    7     61   8.7     0  169  11   4

21. Frank Gifford, HB, 1949-51

30 of 52

    Troy’s leading rusher and scorer in 1951, Frank Gifford also served as a placekicker (he kicked 25 out of 31 extra points in his first season and connected on USC’s first field goal since 1935).

    He graduated from USC in 1956 with a degree in speech communications. Gifford played for 13 years with the New York Giants and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He played in the Pro Bowl eight times and led the Giants in rushing four years in a row.

    First Team All-American: 1951; one team

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1994

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1975

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 1977

    Highlights

    Gifford played in the 1952 College All-Star Game, East-West Shrine Game and Senior Bowl. He was USC’s leader in rushing (841 yards) and total offense (1144 yards) in 1951. Gifford was USC’s leading scorer in 1950 (25 points) and 1951 (74 points) and USC’s interception leader in 1950 (3). His 22-yard field goal at California in 1949 was USC’s first field goal since 1935.

    Gifford was drafted in the first round of the 1952 NFL draft by the New York Giants and played for them from 1952-60 and 1962-64.

    After USC and NFL, Gifford was a TV sports announcer. Gifford was a long-time member of ABC-TV’s Monday Night Football announcing team.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD 1XP FG PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1949 12    -7    -0.6   0    25    1    7   4    0 .571 56   0

    1950 27   43     1.6    2    13    0   43 18  1 .419 162 0

    1951 195 841   4.3    7    26   2    61 32  2 .525 303 2

    ALL    234 877   3.7    9   64    3  111 54 3   486 521 2

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD INT YDS AVG TD

    1949   0     0     0      0      0      0       0      0    —   —   —  —

    1950   0     0     0      0      0      0       0      0     3    19   6.3   0

    1951 11  178 16.2   0      4     97   24.2  —     0     0     0    0

    ALL    11  178 16.2   0      4     97   24.2  —   —   —    —   —

    Punting

    Year P YDS AVG

    1949  — —   —

    1950 1   62  62.0

    1951 34 —  33.4

    ALL    — —    —

20. Bruce Matthews, OG, 1980-82

31 of 52

    Bruce Matthews was the most durable offensive lineman in football history.

    He started for three seasons at USC and even started once late in his true freshman campaign, and then he played every offensive line position during his 19 years with the Houston Oilers, who later became the Tennessee Titans. The 14-time Pro Bowler played more NFL games (296) than any non-kicker in history and never missed a game because of injury.

    USC was in the Top 15 all three years he played.

    He is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    First Team All-American: 1982; eight teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2005

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 2007

    Awards: Pac-10 Morris Trophy (offense) in 1982

    Highlights

    USC was 25-8-1 in his career. USC was 11th in the final AP poll in 1980, 14th in 1981 and 15th in 1982. Matthews played in the 1982 Fiesta Bowl. He was a USC captain in 1982. Matthews played in the 1983 Hula Bowl. He was selected a 1982 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Matthews was drafted in the first round (ninth pick) of the 1983 NFL draft by the Oilers and played with the Oilers/Titans (1983-2001). He played in Super Bowl XXXIV.

    Brother Clay was a linebacker for USC (1974-77).

    After USC and NFL, Matthews became an assistant football coach with the NFL's Houston Texans and Tennessee Titans. He now owns a construction company in Houston.

19. Charles Young, TE, 1970-72

32 of 52

    Charles Young, USC’s first All-American tight end, was a unanimous selection in 1972 as the Trojans won the national championship.

    The three-year (1970-72) letterman, who was nicknamed “Tree,” caught 68 passes in his career for 1,090 yards with 10 touchdowns, including a team-high 29 receptions in 1972, when he also earned All-Conference first team honors.

    He was the sixth pick of the 1973 draft by the Philadelphia Eagles and played 13 seasons in the NFL with the Eagles (1973-76; he was NFL Rookie of the Year in 1973), Los Angeles Rams (1977-79), San Francisco 49ers (1980-82) and Seattle Seahawks (1983-85), including appearances in four Pro Bowls and in Super Bowls XIV and XVI.

    First Team All-American: 1972; eight teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2007

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2004

    National Championship: 1972

    Awards: Shared USC’s Lineman of the Year Award in 1972 (with John Grant)

    Highlights

    USC went 24-8-2 in his career. USC was 15th in the final AP poll in 1970, 20th in 1971 and national champions in 1972. Young played in the 1973 Rose Bowl. Young played in the 1973 Hula Bowl and Coaches All-America Game. He was selected as a 1972 Playboy Pre-Season All-American. Young was USC’s pass receiving leader in 1972 (29 catches).

    Nickname was "Tree."

    Young was drafted in the first round (sixth pick) of the 1973 NFL draft by the Eagles and played for the Eagles (1973-76), Rams (1977-79), 49ers (1980-82) and Seahawks (1983-85). He played in Super Bowls XIV and XVI.

    Daughters Candace, Cerenity and Chanel competed on the USC track team.

    He now is a minister in Seattle, where he runs a learning center for at-risk youths.

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG  TD

    1970 16    322 21.1    1

    1971 23    298  12.9   6

    1972 29    470  16.2   3

    ALL   68   1090  16.1 10

18. Tony Boselli, OT, 1991-94

33 of 52

    Tony Boselli is regarded as one of the finest offensive tackles to play at USC and in the NFL. He was a two-time All-American and USC captain in 1994. He was the first three-time Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    He was drafted in the first round by the Jaguars and played until 2002, finishing with the Texans in the expansion draft but never playing for Houston due to injuries. He was a four-time All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowler. He twice was the NFL Lineman of the Year and was named to the NFL's 1990s All-Decade Team.

    First Team All-American: 1992, 1994; eight teams

    Awards: Pac-10 Morris Trophy (offense) in 1994, USC’s MVP in 1994, USC’s Offensive Player of the Year Award in 1991, USC’s Gloomy Gus Henderson Award (most minutes played) in 1991, USC’s Howard Jones/Football Alumni Club Academic Award (highest grade point average) in 1994, 1994 National Football Foundation Scholar-Athlete

    Highlights

    USC was 25-21-2 in his career. USC was 13th in the final AP poll in 1994. Boselli played in the 1992 and 1993 Freedom Bowls and 1995 Cotton Bowl. He was a USC captain in 1994. Boselli was selected as a three-time (1992-94) Playboy Pre-Season All-American (the first from any school).

    Boselli was drafted in the first round (second pick) of the 1995 NFL draft by the Jaguars and played for the Jaguars (1995- 2001) and Texans (2002).

    After USC and the NFL, he became a sports radio talk show host and game analyst.

17. Anthony Munoz, OT, 1976-79

34 of 52

    Regarded as one of the greatest offensive tackles to play the game, Anthony Munoz played for three Rose Bowl teams (1976, 1978, 1979), including USC’s 1978 national champions.

    He was big (6'6") but agile.

    Munoz was drafted by the Bengals in 1980 and played 13 seasons. He was a 1998 inductee into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1999

    National Championship: 1978

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 1998

    Highlights

    Anthony Munoz was a four-year letterman (1976-79) footballer, including a national championship in 1978, and also pitched for the Trojan baseball team.

    He was drafted by the Cincinnati Bengals in 1980 and played for them until 1992. He was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1998.

    Anthony Munoz and Ronnie Lott were selected to the NFL's All-Time Team in August 2000, as chosen by the 36 Pro Football Hall of Fame voters.

    He now does football television commentary.

16. Troy Polamalu, S, 1999-02

35 of 52

    Maybe the greatest all-time USC safety, Troy Polamalu created havoc forcing fumbles, sacks and interceptions. He was a two-time All American.

    Polamalu was drafted in the first round by the Steelers in 2003 and continued created havoc in the NFL. He has played in three Super Bowls (so far) and is one of the best defensive players in the league.

    First Team All-American: 2001, 2002; seven teams

    Awards: 2002 Thorpe Award finalist, USC MVP in 2001, USC Most Inspirational Player in 2002

    Highlights

    USC was 28-21 in his career. USC was fourth in the final AP poll in 2002. Polamalu played in the 2001 Las Vegas Bowl and 2003 Orange Bowl. He was a USC captain in 2001 and 2002. He was selected a 2002 Playboy Pre-Season All-American. Polamalu led USC in tackles (118) and interceptions (three) in 2001. He led USC in interceptions (two) and deflections (seven) in 2000.

    Polamalu was drafted in the first round (16th pick) of the 2003 NFL draft by the Steelers and has played for the Steelers since. He played in Super Bowls XL, XLIII and XLV.

    Uncle Kennedy Pola (now Polamalu) was a USC football player (1982-85) and assistant coach (2000-03 and 2010-present).

    Tackles

    Year TAC LOSS/YDS DFL FR INT YDS AVG TD

    1999 12         2/28       2*    0   0     0    0.0   0

    2000 83          5/10       7      1  2    43  21.5  1

    2001 118      13/24    9**    1  3   116 38.7  2

    2002 68          9/44      4       0  1     33  33.0 0

    ALL   281      29/106  17*** 2 6    192 32.0 3

    *Includes one blocked punt

    **Includes three blocked punts

    ***Includes four blocked punts

15. Rodney Peete, QB, 1986-89

36 of 52

    Rodney Peete was the most elusive quarterback in USC annals, able to hurt opponents with his arm and his legs. He was the first player from USC to win the Johnny Unitas Award as the nation’s best senior QB and finished second to Barry Sanders in voting for the Heisman Trophy in 1988.

    Peete played 16 years in the NFL after being selected by the Detroit Lions in 1989. His career was marked by injury, and he played for six teams.

    Heisman: Runner-up 1988 to Barry Sanders

    First Team All-American: 1988, one team

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2009

    Awards: 1988 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award (given to the nation’s top senior quarterback), 1988 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), 1988 Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year, USC’s MVP in 1987 and 1988, USC’s Offensive Player of the Year Award in 1986 and 1987, USC’s Offensive Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1986, 1987 and 1988

    Highlights

    USC was 31-17 in his career. USC was 18th in the final AP poll in 1987 and seventh in 1988. Peete played in the 1985 Aloha Bowl, 1987 Citrus Bowl and 1988 and 1989 Rose Bowls (he threw two TD passes in the 1988 game and ran for two TDs in the 1989 game). He was a USC captain in 1988. Peete played in the 1988 East-West Shrine Game and 1989 Hula Bowl.

    He was USC’s passing leader in 1986 (160 completions), 1987 (197 completions, 15th in USC history) and 1988 (223 completions, 10th in USC history). Peete was USC’s total offense leader in 1986 (2,262 yards, 18th in USC history), 1987 (2,854 yards, 10th in USC history) and 1988 (2,880 yards, ninth in USC history). He is ranked fourth on USC’s career passing list (630 completions).

    Peete set two USC career passing records and one single-game passing record. He had 19 200-yard passing games in his career. Peete is ranked third on USC’s career total offense list (8,540 yards) and set two USC career total offense records.

    Nickname was Sweet Peete.

    Peete also started in the infield on the USC baseball team for three years (1985, 1987-88), posting a .297 career batting average with 18 home runs and 84 RBI. He made the All-Pac-10 first team in 1988 as a third baseman. He was also drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays out of high school and the Oakland Athletics and Detroit Tigers while in college.

    Peete was drafted in the sixth round of the 1989 NFL draft by the Lions and played for the Lions (1989-93), Cowboys (1994), Eagles (1995-98), Redskins (1999), Raiders (2000-01) and Panthers (2002-04). He played in Super Bowl XXXVIII.

    After USC and NFL, Peete became a TV sports talk show host.

    Passing

    Year PA  PC    PI PCT YDS TD TCB YDS AVG TD

    1985  85  50     3 .588 566    5   49   78    1.6  1

    1986 305 160 15 .525 2138 10 103 124  1.2  3

    1987 332 197 12 .593 2709 21 70   145  2.1  3

    1988 359 223 12 .621 2812 18 68    68   1.0  5

    ALL  1081 630 42 .583 8225 54 290 415 1.4 12

14. Ron Yary, OT-DT, 1965-67

37 of 52

    Ron Yary, who set the standard for the modern-era offensive tackles at USC and professionally, is the only Trojan Outland Trophy winner (he did so in 1967) and the West Coast’s first.

    He was a team player who started out as a defensive tackle, achieving Pac-8 defensive lineman of the year. Coach John McKay asked him to switch to offensive tackle as a junior, and he became a two-time All-American.

    Blocking for tailback O.J. Simpson, Yary helped lead USC to the 1967 national championship.

    Yary was the No. 1 pick of the Vikings in 1968 and played until 1982, finishing with the Rams. He played in four Super Bowls and was a six-time NFL All Pro. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2001.

    First Team All-American: 1966, 1967; 19 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1997

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1987

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 2001

    National Championship: 1967

    Awards: Outland

    Highlights

    USC was 24-7-1 in his career and won two conference titles. The 1965 team was ranked 10th in the final AP poll, and USC won the NC in 1967. Yary played in two Rose Bowls (1967 and 1968). He was a three-time All-Conference first-teamer (1965-67), the first year as a defensive tackle and the last two as an offensive tackle. Yary played in the 1968 Coaches All-America Game, College All-Star Game and Hula Bowl. He was selected as a 1967 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Yary was drafted by the Vikings as the No. 1 pick (USC’s first ever) of the 1968 NFL draft and played for the Vikings (1968-82) and Rams (1982). He played in Super Bowls IV, XIII, IV and XI.

    Brother Wayne was an offensive guard for USC (1969-70).

    After USC and the NFL, Yary became owner of a photography, printing and publishing business.

13. Ronnie Lott, DB, 1977-80

38 of 52

    One of the greatest safeties in USC and NFL football history, Ronnie Lott was known for his ferocious hits and heady, aggressive play.

    Lott was a 1980 All-American and team captain and a four-year letterman (1977-80). He played on Troy's 1978 national championship team, and his teams won three postseason bowls (including two Rose Bowls). He is fourth on USC's career interceptions chart (14).

    He starred in the NFL from 1981 to 1995 (with the San Francisco 49ers, Los Angeles Raiders and New York Jets) and played in four Super Bowls. He made it into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and College Football Hall of Fame.

    First Team All-American: 1980; eight teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2002

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 2000

    National Championship: 1978

    Awards: USC’s MVP in 1980, shared USC’s Defensive Player of the Year Award (with Dennis Smith) in 1980, USC’s Davis-Teschke Award (Most Inspirational Player) in 1980, USC’s Defensive Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1979 and 1980

    Highlights

    USC went 39-7-2 in his career. USC was 13th in the final AP poll in 1977, second in 1979, 11th in 1980 and won the national championship in 1978. Lott played in the 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls and 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl. He was a USC captain in 1980. Lott played in the 1981 Hula Bowl. He was selected as a 1980 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Lott led USC in interceptions in 1979 (three) and 1980 (eight) and tied for the NCAA lead in interceptions in 1980 (0.73 average). Lott also tied for fourth on USC’s career interception list (14, including one intercepted fumble).

    Lott also played basketball briefly at USC in 1980.

    Lott was drafted in the first round (eighth pick) of the 1981 NFL draft by the 49ers and played for the 49ers (1981-90), Raiders (1991-92) and Jets (1993-94). He played in Super Bowls XVI, XIX, XXIII and XXIV.

    Anthony Munoz and Ronnie Lott were selected to the NFL's All-Time Team in August 2000, as chosen by the 36 Pro Football Hall of Fame voters.

    After USC and the NFL, Lott became a television sports commentator and business entrepreneur.

    Tackles

    Year TAC LOSS/YDS DFL FR INT YDS AVG TD

    1977  27        0/0         5     1    0     0     0.0    0

    1978   63       5/20       7     4    3   49   16.3   0

    1979   74       7/26       9     2    3   76    25.3  1

    1980   86        5/22     16    3    8  166   20.8  1

    ALL    250      22/68    37   10  14* 291 20.8 2

    *includes one intercepted fumble

12. Richard Wood, ILB, 1972-74

39 of 52

    Richard Wood, nicknamed “Batman,” is USC football’s first three-year All-American first-teamer and was the first three-year All-American selectee by AP from the West Coast.

    He was honored in 1972, '73 and '74 (he was a consensus pick in 1973 and 1974). The three-year letterman linebacker was a member of USC’s 1972 and 1974 national championship teams and played in three Rose Bowls (1973-75). Also a three-time All-Conference first-teamer (1972-73-74), he captained the 1974 Trojans and won USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1972.

    He was picked in the third round of the 1975 NFL draft by the Jets and played for the Jets (1975) and Buccaneers (1976-84).

    First Team All-American: 1972, 1973; 11 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2003

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2007

    National Championship: 1972, 1974

    Awards: USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1972

    Highlights

    USC went 31-2-2 in his career. Wood was USC’s first three-year All-American first-teamer and the first three-year selectee by AP from the West Coast. USC was eighth in the final AP poll in 1973 and national champions in 1972 and 1974. He played in the 1973, '74 and '75 Rose Bowls. He was a USC captain in 1974. Wood played in the 1975 Hula Bowl, Senior Bowl and College All-Star Game. Wood was selected as a 1973 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Wood was drafted in the third round of the 1975 NFL draft by the Jets and played for the Jets (1975) and Buccaneers (1976-84).

    After USC and the NFL, Wood became an assistant coach in the NFL and in Europe, a high school head coach (he was the 2002 Florida Coach of the Year) and a security officer.

    Interceptions

    Year INT YDS AVG TD TAC DFL FR

    1972   5    56   11.2 1    —   —  —

    1973   1     8     8.0   0    117 5   1

    1974   1      5     5.0  0      89  5  1

    ALL      7   69     9.9   1   —   —  —

11. Carson Palmer, QB, 1998-02

40 of 52

    After a 21-year drought, Carson Palmer became USC’s fifth Heisman Trophy winner (and the first from the West Coast since 1981), as well as Troy's first quarterback winner ever.

    A four-year starter, he set or tied 33 Pac-10 and USC total offense and passing records, including becoming the league's career leader in total offense (11,621 yards) and passing yards (11,818 yards). He threw for 300-plus yards in a USC-record seven games that season, including three in a row. He completed at least 60 percent of his passes nine times.

    In 2002, the All-American first teamer (USC’s first quarterback to do so since 1988) also won many awards as the top quarterback and player of the year.

    Heisman: 2002

    First Team All-American: 2002; six teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2003

    Awards: 2002 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm (nation’s top senior QB), MVP 2003 Orange Bowl, 2002 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), 2002 The National Quarterback Club’s National College Quarterback of the Year Award, 2002 The Sporting News and CNNSI.com National Player of the Year, 2002 finalist for the Walter Camp Player of the Year Award and Archie Griffin Trophy, 2002 Pac-10 Co-Offensive Player of the Year, USC's MVP in 2002, USC's Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 2000 and 2002

    Highlights

    USC was 36-26 in his career. USC was fourth in the final AP poll in 2002. Palmer played in the 1998 Sun Bowl, 2001 Las Vegas Bowl and 2003 Orange Bowl. He was a USC captain in 2002. Palmer set or tied 33 Pac-10 and USC total offense and passing records. He played in the 2003 Senior Bowl.

    He wasUSC's passing leader in 1998 (130 completions), 2000 (228 completions, ninth in USC history), 2001 (221 completions, 11th in USC history) and 2002 (309 completions, first in USC history). Palmer was USC's total offense leader in 1998 (1,639 yards), 2000 (2,919 yards, eighth in USC history), 2001 (2,751 yards, 12th in USC history) and 2002 (3,820 yards, second in USC history).

    Palmer is first on USC's career passing list (927 completions). Palmer finished his career fourth in NCAA passing yards (11,388) and eighth in total offense (11,093). He owns the Pac-10 record with 31 200-yard passing games in his career. Palmer is first on the Pac-10's career total offense list (11,621) and passing yardage list (11,818).

    Palmer was drafted by the Bengals as the No. 1 pick of the 2003 NFL draft and played for the Bengals from 2003 to 2010). He was traded to the Oakland Raiders in October 2011 because he refused to play any longer for the Bengals.

    Passing

    Year   PA    PC     PI PCT   YDS   TD TCB YDS AVG TD

    1998 235 130       6 .553 1755        7     47 -116 -2.5  1

    1999 53    39         3 .736  490        3      7    2   0.3  1

    2000 415 228     18 .549 2914      16  63        5    0.1 2

    2001 377 221     12 .586 2717      13   88     34    0.4 1

    2002 489 309     10 .632 3942      33   50   -122 -2.4  4

    ALL 1569 927     49 .591 11818     72 255  -197 -0.8  9

10. Sam Cunningham, FB, 1970-72

41 of 52

    Sam Cunningham not only was one of the finest fullbacks in USC history, but he had a profound effect on college football as well. His 135-yard, two-touchdown performance in a Trojan victory at Alabama in 1970 convinced Bear Bryant to integrate Southern football.

    He was known as “Sam Bam” because of his famous goal-line dives for touchdowns (he leaped for four short TDs to win Player of the Game honors in the 1973 Rose Bowl and later was inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1992).

    He won All-American first team honors on USC’s 1972 national championship team, which he co-captained (he was Troy’s Back of the Year that season). A three-year letterman (1970-72), his 1,579 rushing yards put him in the top 25 of USC’s prestigious career rushing list.

    He was the 11th pick of the 1973 NFL draft by the New England Patriots and played there for nine seasons. His younger brother Randall became a star quarterback in the NFL.

    First Team All-American: 1972; two teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2001

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2010

    National Championship: 1972

    Awards: 1973 Rose Bowl Player of the Game, USC’s Back of the Year Award in 1972, Inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1992

    Highlights

    USC went 24-8-2 in his career. USC was 15th in the final AP poll in 1970, 20th in 1971 and the national champion in 1972. Cunningham played in the 1973 Rose Bowl, scoring on four short touchdown dives and being named Rose Bowl Player of the Game. He was a USC captain in 1972. His performance at Alabama in 1970 (135 yards and two TDs on just 12 carries) convinced Bear Bryant to integrate Southern football.

    Cunningham played in the 1973 Hula Bowl, College All-Star Game and Coaches All-America Game. He is ranked 30th on USC’s career rushing list (1579 yards).

    Nickname was "Sam Bam" (because of his goal-line dives).

    Cunningham was drafted in the first round (11th pick) of the 1973 NFL draft by the Patriots and played for the Patriots (1973-79 and 1981-82).

    Brother Randall was an NFL quarterback.

    After USC and the NFL, Cunningham owned a landscaping business.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD REC YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1970   76  488 6.4     5   16   167 10.42 0     0     0     0.0    0

    1971  159 742 4.6     5   12    67   5.6    0      0     0     0.0    0

    1972  102 349 3.4    13    6    59   9.8    0     2    20    10.0  0

    ALL     337 1579 4.7 23   34  293  8.6    2     2    20    10.0  0

9. Ricky Bell, TB-FB, 1973-76

42 of 52

    Ricky Bell came to USC as a linebacker and was known for his punishing running style. He helped USC win the national championship in 1974 and was third in the Heisman voting in 1975 and runner-up in 1976.

    He set USC game records for rushing yards and carries (347 yards on 51 carries at Washington State in 1976).

    Bell was the USC MVP in 1975 and 1976 and is one of the leading rushers in the history of USC.

    Bell was the No. 1 pick of the 1977 NFL draft by the Buccaneers and played for the Buccaneers (1977-81) and Chargers (1982).

    Heisman: third place 1975, runner-up in 1976

    First Team All-American: 1976; eight teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1997

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2003

    National Championship: 1974

    Awards: 1975 Liberty Bowl MVP, 1976 Voit Trophy (given to the outstanding player on the Pacific Coast), 1976 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), 1976 Pac-10 Player of the Year, USC’s MVP in 1975 and 1976, USC’s Back of the Year Award in 1975, USC’s Player of the Game versus Notre Dame Award in 1975, USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1975 and 1976

    Highlights

    USC went 38-8-2 in his career. USC was eighth in the final AP poll in 1973, 17th in 1975, second in 1976 and NC in 1974. Bell played in the 1974, 1975 and 1977 Rose Bowls and 1975 Liberty Bowl. He was a USC captain in 1976. Bell played in the 1977 Hula Bowl and Japan Bowl. He was selected as a 1976 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Bell was USC’s rushing leader in 1975 (1,957 yards, third on USC’s season list) and 1976 (1,433 yards, 11th on USC’s season list). He was USC’s total offense leader in 1975 (1,957 yards) and scoring leader in 1975 (88 points) and 1976 (86 points). Bell is ranked fourth on USC’s career rushing list (3,689 yards). He ranks 17th on USC’s career total offense list (3,689 yards).

    Bell owns Pac-10 season rushing record for juniors (1,957 yards in 1975) and USC game records for rushing yards and carries (347 yards on 51 carries at Washington State in 1976). Bell had 16 100-yard rushing games. He led the Pac-8 in rushing in 1975 (170.5 average, tops in the NCAA) and 1976 (141.7 average).

    Bell was drafted by the Buccaneers as the No. 1 pick of the 1977 NFL draft and played for the Buccaneers (1977-81) and Chargers (1982).

    After USC and the NFL, Bell was a restaurant owner. He died at the age of 29 in 1984 of a rare muscular disease of the heart.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD 2XP REC YDS AVG TD

    1973   0      0    0.0      0   0      0      0     0.0  0

    1974  45   299  6.6      1   0     0      0     0.0  0

    1975 385 1957 5.1  13   2     4   100   25.0  1

    1976  280 1433 5.1 14    1   14    85    6.1   0

    ALL    710 3689 5.2 28    3    18   185 13.2  1

8. Lynn Swann, FL, 1971-73

43 of 52

    Lynn Swann, who caught footballs with a balletic grace, is one of the finest wide receivers in collegiate and professional history.

    The three-year (1971-73) letterman at USC was a consensus All-American as a 1973 senior. He led the Trojans in receiving in 1971 (27 catches) and 1973 (a Pac-8-best 42) and was Troy's leading punt returner in all three of his seasons.

    He played for the Pittsburgh Steelers for nine years, including four Super Bowls, and ended up in the USC, College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame.

    First Team All-American: 1973; seven teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2005

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1993

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 2001

    National Championship: 1972

    Awards: 1999 NCAA Silver Anniversary Award, 1973 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), USC’s MVP Award in 1973

    Highlights

    USC went 27-6-2 in his career. USC was 20th in the final AP poll in 1971, eighth in 1973 and national champions in 1972. Swann played in the 1973 and 1974 Rose Bowls, catching a TD pass in the 1973 game. He was a USC captain in 1973. Swann played in the 1974 Hula Bowl, Senior Bowl, College All-Star Game and Coaches All-America Game. He was selected as a 1973 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Swann  was USC’s receiving leader in 1971 (27 catches) and 1973 (42 catches, tops in the Pac-8) and USC’s punt return leader in 1971 (157 yards), 1972 (253 yards, tops in the Pac-8) and 1973 (189 yards). Swann is tied for 22nd on USC’s career receiving list (95 catches) and fourth on USC’s career punt return list (599 yards). Swann had three 100-yard receiving games in career.

    Swann was drafted in the first round of the 1974 NFL draft by the Steelers and played for the Steelers (1974-82). He played in Super Bowls IX, X, XIII and XIV, earning MVP honors in Super Bowl X.

    After USC and the NFL, he became a television sports commentator.

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1971 27 305 11.3 2 11 157 14.3 0 3 66 22.0 0

    1972 26 543 20.9 3 19 253 13.31 0 0 0.0 0

    1973 42 714 17.0 6 19 189 10.01 0 0 0.0 0

    ALL  95 156216.4 11 49 599 12.2 2 3 66 22.0 0

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1971   1 -16   -16.00 0    0   0   0   0.0    0 0

    1972  11 117  10.60 1     0  0   0   0.0    0 0

    1973  14  99     7.1    0     0  0   0   0.0    0 0

    ALL   26 200   7.7   0    0    0    0     .00  0 0

7. Anthony Davis, TB, 1972-74

44 of 52

    Anthony Davis, known by Trojan fans everywhere as “A.D.,” was one of USC’s most exciting tailbacks.

    A 1974 All-American and the Heisman Trophy runner-up that year, he set or tied 24 NCAA, Pac-8 and USC records during his three-year (1972-74) career.

    Still USC's No. 3 all-time rusher and No. 2 career kickoff returner, he was the first player in Pac-8 history to rush for 1,000 yards in three successive years.

    He was on USC’s 1972 and 1974 national championship teams and played in three Rose Bowls. He was particularly effective against Notre Dame, scoring 11 career TDs versus the Irish (including six as a sophomore in 1972).

    He also was a star baseball player at USC. He then played in the NFL, WFL, CFL and USFL.

    Heisman: Runner-up in 1974

    First Team All-American: 1974; six teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1999

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2005

    National Championships: 1972, 1974

    Awards: 1972 and 1974 Voit Trophy (given to the outstanding player on the Pacific Coast), 1974 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), USC’s Back of the Year Award in 1974, USC’s Player of the Game versus Notre Dame Award in 1972, USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1974

    Highlights

    USC went 31-2-2 in his career. USC was eighth in the final AP poll in 1973 and NC in 1972 and 1974. Davis played in the 1973, '74 and '75 Rose Bowls (including rushing for 157 yards with a TD in 1973 game and scoring a TD in the 1974 game). He played in the 1975 Hula Bowl. Davis was selected as a 1974 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    He was USC’s rushing leader in 1972 (1,191 yards, 16th on USC’s season list), 1973 (1,112 yards, 22nd on USC’s season list) and 1974 (1,421 yards, 12th on USC’s season list). Davis was USC’s total offense leader in 1974 (1,430 yards) and scoring leader in 1972 (114 points), 1973 (90 points) and 1974 (110 points). Davis was USC’s kickoff return leader in 1972 (468 yards), 1973 (409 yards) and 1974 (484 yards).

    Davis is ranked third on USC’s career rushing list (3724 yards). He is ranked 16th on USC’s career total offense list (3,743 yards). Davis is ranked fourth on USC’s career kickoff return list (1,361 yards). Davis owns one Pac-10 career rushing record, two Pac-10 career kickoff return records, one NCAA season kickoff return record, one Pac-10 season kickoff return mark, two Pac-10 game scoring records, one USC game all-purpose record, two NCAA game kickoff return marks and three NCAA long play records.

    Davis had 17 100-yard rushing games in his career. He led the NCAA in kickoff returns in 1974 (42.5 average). Davis led the Pac-8 in rushing in 1972 (94.0 average) and 1974 (123.1 average). He led the Pac-8 in scoring in 1972 (9.8 average) and 1974 (10.2 average).

    Davis scored 11 touchdowns versus Notre Dame, including six in 1972 and four in 1974.

    Nickname was A.D.

    Davis was drafted in the second round of the 1975 NFL draft by the Jets and played for the Buccaneers (1977), Oilers (1978) and Rams (1978), as well as in the World Football League and Canadian Football League.

    Davis was also was an outfielder on USC’s 1973 and 1974 national championship baseball teams.

    After USC and the NFL, Davis became an actor and real estate developer and worked in the USC athletic department.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD 2XP PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1972 207 1191 5.8  17   0    0    0   0   .000   0   0

    1973 276 1112 4.0  14    0   1    1   0   1.000 10 1

    1974 301 1421 4.7  13    1   1    1   0   1.000 9   1

    ALL   784 3724 4.8  44    1    2   2    0   1.000 19 2

    Kickoff returns

    Year KOR YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD REC YDS AVG TD

    1972 12    468 39.0   2    7   52   7.4     0   18   132  7.3  0

    1973 16    409 25.6   1    1     8    8.0    0   14    47   3.4   0

    1974 12    484 40.3   3    0     0    0.0    0    15    96  6.4   2

    ALL    40  1361 34.0  6    8    60  7.5     0    47   275 5.9   2

6. Charles White, TB, 1976-79

45 of 52

    Charles White was USC's third Heisman Trophy-winning tailback (1979) and still is the school's career rushing leader (6,245 yards, then the No. 2 mark in NCAA history) while scoring 49 touchdowns.

    A four-year USC letterman (1976-77-78-79) and two-time unanimous All-American (1978-79), White set 22 NCAA, Pac-10, USC and Rose Bowl records. He captained the 1979 Trojans while leading the nation in rushing. The 1978 and 1979 Rose Bowl Player of the Game, he is a member of the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame.

    USC went 42-6-1 during his four-year career, won the 1978 national title and was victorious in four bowls (including three Rose Bowls). He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1996.

    White played in the NFL from 1980 to 1988 with the Browns and Rams. He led the league in rushing in 1987.

    Heisman: 1979, fourth place 1978

    First Team All-American: 1978, 1979; 13 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1996

    National Championship: 1978

    Awards: 1978 Maxwell (nation’s top player), 1978 Walter Camp (national player of the year), 1979 Rose Bowl Co-MVP, 1980 Rose Bowl MVP, 1978 Voit Trophy (given to the outstanding player on the Pacific Coast), 1979 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), Pac-10 Player of the Year in 1978 and 1979, Rose Bowl Hall of Fame Inductee in 1990, USC’s MVP in 1978 and 1979, USC’s Offensive Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1978 and 1979, Amateur Athletic Foundation Southern California Athlete of the Year in 1979

    Highlights

    USC went 42-6-1 in his career. USC was second in the final AP poll in 1976, 13th in 1977, second in 1979 and NC in 1978. White played in the 1977 (122 rushing yards and one TD), 1979 (99 rushing yards and one TD) and 1980 Rose Bowls (game-record 247 rushing yards and one TD) and 1977 Bluebonnet Bowl (one TD). He was a USC captain in 1979. White played in the 1980 Hula Bowl. He was selected as a two-time Playboy Pre-Season All-American (1978-79).

    White was USC’s rushing leader in 1977 (1,478 yards, ninth in USC history), 1978 (1,859 yards, fifth in USC history) and 1979 (2,050 yards, second in USC history). He was USC’s total offense leader in 1978 (1,854 yards). White was USC’s scoring leader in 1978 (86 points) and 1979 (114 points). He was USC’s kickoff return leader in 1976 (295 yards). White set or equaled 22 NCAA, Pac-10, USC and Rose Bowl records.

    White finished his career as the NCAA’s second-leading rusher (5,598 regular-season yards) and the Pac-10’s top rusher (6,245 yards, tops in USC history). White is fifth on USC’s career total offense list (6,240 yards). He had 31 100-yard rushing games (10 in 1979). White was the NCAA’s leading rusher in 1979 (180.3 average). He was the Pac-10’s rushing leader in 1977 (117.4 average) and 1978 (146.7 average). White was the NCAA’s all-purpose running yardage leader in 1978 (174.7 average) and 1979 (194.1 average).  He was the Pac-10’s scoring leader in 1978 (6.7 average) and 1979 (12.5 average).

    White was a member of USC’s 1979 track team.

    White was drafted in the first round of the 1980 NFL draft by the Browns and played for the Browns (1980-84) and Rams (1985-88).

    After USC and the NFL, White returned to USC in 1990 as a special assistant to the athletic director. In 1993, he became an assistant football coach in charge of the Trojan running backs (a position he held through 1997). He then held an administrative job at USC and was a computer consultant.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD 2XP PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1976 156 858   5.5   10   0    0    0    0 .000   0   0

    1977 285 1478 5.2    7    0    1     0   0 .000   0   0

    1978 374 1859 5.0  13    1    1     1   0 1.000 -5 0

    1979 332 2050 6.2   19   0    0     0    0 .000   0   0

    ALL   114  76245 5.4 49   1   2     1    0 .500  -5  0

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1976 6      65    10.8 1    14    295 21.1 0

    1977 9    138    15.3 2     0       0     0.0  0

    1978 22  193    8.8    1    7    145  20.7 0

    1979 22  145    6.6    0     0      0     0.0  0

    ALL   59   541    9.2   4    21   440 21.0  0 

5. Reggie Bush, RB, 2003-05

46 of 52

    Although tarnished by accepting money from third parties as arranged by his stepfather in San Diego in violation of NCAA rules, Reggie Bush is one of the most exciting running backs in USC history.

    He received numerous awards, including winning the Heisman Trophy (since forfeited) in 2005 and finishing fifth in voting in 2004. Bush helped USC win the 2003 and 2004 national championships.

    Unfortunately, the NCAA sanctions that resulted from his violations will handicap the Trojans and punish many football players that had nothing to do with these violations for many years. However, the excessive sanctions are also an indictment on the NCAA, but don’t get me started on that subject.

    Bush’s achievements on the field will always be remembered.

    Bush was the second pick of the 2006 draft by the Saints and played with them until 2010, when he was traded to the Miami Dolphins.

    Heisman: 2005 (forfeit 2010), fifth 2004

    First Team All-American: 2004, 2005; 18 teams

    National Championship: 2003, 2004

    Awards: 2004 College Player of the Year by the Touchdown Club of Columbus, 2004 Pac-10 Co- Offensive Player of the Year and All-Conference first-teamer, USC’s 2004 team MVP and Co-Player of the Game versus UCLA, USC's Jack Oakie "Rise and Shine" Award in 2003 and 2004, 2005 AP Player of the Year Award, 2005 Walter Camp Player of the Year Award, 2005 The Sporting News Player of the Year Award, 2005 Touchdown Club of Columbus Player of the Year Award, 2005 The Pigskin Club of Washington D.C. Offensive Player of the Year Award, 2005 Doak Walker Award (as nation's top running back, USC's first recipient), 2005 Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year, finalist for 2005 Maxwell Award and Sullivan Award, 2005 runner-up for AP Male Athlete of the Year Award,  USC's 2005 team MVP, 2005 Player of the Game versus Notre Dame and Co-Player of the Game versus UCLA

    Highlights

    USC was second in the final AP poll in 2005 and NC in 2003 and 2004. Bush played in the 2004 Rose Bowl, 2005 Orange Bowl and 2006 Rose Bowl. He was selected as a 2005 Playboy Pre-Season All-American. Bush was a Freshman All-American first-teamer in 2003.

    In 2005, Bush was first nationally in all-purpose running (222.3), fourth in rushing (133.9, second in Pac-10) and 20th in scoring (8.8). He was USC's 2005 leader in rushing (1,740 yards, sixth-best in USC history) and all-purpose running (a Pac-10-record 2,890 yards). Bush averaged a Pac-10-record 8.7 yards per carry in 2005. His 19 TDs in 2005 averaged 31.6 yards each. He had 554 rushing yards in consecutive games in 2005 (Fresno State and UCLA).

    In 2004, Bush was fifth nationally in all-purpose running (179.2, first in Pac-10) and ninth in punt returns (15.7, first in Pac-10). He was ranked 10th nationally in kickoff returns (27.3, first in Pac-10) in 2003. Bush ranks second on USC's career kickoff return yardage list (1,523 yards), fifth on USC's career punt return yardage chart (559 yards), seventh on USC's career rushing list (3,169 yards), 20th on USC's career total offense ladder (3,221 yards) and tied for 22nd on USC's pass-catching list (95 receptions).

    Bush had 11 100-yard rushing games (including twice with at least 260 yards). Bush averaged an NCAA-record 7.3 yards per carry in his career. He had 6,617 all-purpose yards in his career, including a Pac-10-record 513 yards against Fresno State in 2005 (second in NCAA history).

    Bush had 99 plays of 20-plus yards in his career. He was the first Trojan to win Pac-10 titles in both punt returns (2004) and kickoff returns (2003) and the first Trojan to win the Pac-10 crown in all-purpose yards (2004 and 2005). Bush produced touchdowns via rushing, receiving, kickoff returning, punt returning and passing in his career.

    Nickname is The President.

    Bush was drafted in the first round (second pick) of the 2006 draft by the New Orleans Saints and has played for the Saints (2006-10) and Miami Dolphins (2011). He played in Super Bowl XLIV.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVGTD LG REC YDS AVG TD LG

    2003 90    521 5.8   3   58  15   314  20.9  4 60

    2004*143 908 6.3   6   81  43   509  11.8  7 69

    2005*200 1740 8.7 16 76 37    478 12.9   2 43

    ALL*  433 3169 7.3  25 81 95  1301 13.7 13 69

    Kickoff Returns

    Year KOR YDS AVG TD LG PR YDS AVG TD LG

    2003 18   492   27.3  1  96   2    4    2.0    0    4

    2004* 21 537   25.6  0  84  24 376 15.7 2   65

    2005* 28 493    17.6 0  30  18 179  9.9  1    84

    ALL*   67 1523 22.7  1   96  44 559 12.7 3   84

    Passing

    Year PA PC PI PCT YDS TD LG

    2004* 1  1   0 1.000 52  1  52

    2005*2  0    0 .000   0    0   0

    ALL*   3  1    0 .333  52  1  52

    *Participation in last two games of 2004 and all of 2005 later vacated due to NCAA penalty

4. Matt Leinart, QB, 2002-05

47 of 52

    Matt Leinart, USC’s sixth Heisman Trophy winner (in 2004) and its first junior recipient, is regarded by many as the greatest quarterback in Trojan history.

    The three-time (2003-05) All-American was 37-2 as a starter and guided Troy to consecutive national championships (2003-04) and then a No. 2 ranking in 2005.

    He became a role model for America’s youth when he returned to USC in 2005 instead of bypassing his senior year to enter the NFL.

    He is second on USC's career completions (807), passing yardage (10,693) and total offense (10,623) charts, and his 99 touchdown passes and 64.8 percent completion mark are Pac-10 career records. He set 16 school records, including 11 Pac-10 and two NCAA marks. He was the MVP of the 2004 Rose Bowl and 2005 Orange Bowl.

    A four-year letter winner (2002-05), two-time (2004-05) USC captain and three-time (2003-05) All-Pac-10 first-teamer, he was the 2003 Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year (only the second sophomore so honored, along with Stanford's John Elway)and 2004 Pac-10 Co-Offensive Player of the Year (just the fourth player and second quarterback to win that honor twice).

    Among his numerous national honors, in 2004 he won the Walter Camp Player of the Year and AP Player of the Year and Manning Awards, and in 2005 he received the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm and Pop Warner Awards, as well as The Sporting News National Sportsman of the Year and Southern California Sportsman of the Year. He also was a finalist for the 2004 and 2005 Sullivan Award (given to the nation’s top amateur athlete).

    Heisman: 2004, sixth place 2003, third place 2005

    First Team All-American: 2003, 2004, 2005; nine teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 2007

    National Championship: 2003, 2004

    Awards: 2003 Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year (only second sophomore so honored, along with Stanford's John Elway)and 2004 Pac-10 Co-Offensive Player of the Year (just the fourth player, and only the second quarterback, to win that honor twice), Touchdown Club of Columbus' Archie Griffin Award in 2003 and 2004, USC's Player of the Game versus Notre Dame Award in 2003 and 2004, 2004 Walter Camp Player of the Year Award, 2004 AP Player of the Year, 2004 Manning Award and Victor Award College Football Player of the Year, finalist for the 2004 and 2005 Sullivan Award, 2004 and 2005 Playboy Pre-Season All-American, 2005 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award (top senior quarterback), 2005 Touchdown Club of Columbus' Quarterback of the Year Award, 2005 Pop Warner Award (top senior on West Coast), 2005 The Sporting News Sportsman of the Year, 2005 Southern California Sportsman of the Year,  finalist for 2005 Davey O'Brien Award, finalist for 2005 Maxwell Award, finalist for 2005 Walter Camp Award, finalist for Manning Award

    Highlights

    USC was 48-4 in his career, including 37-2 when he started. USC was fourth in the final AP poll in 2002, second in 2005 and NC in 2003 and 2004. Leinart played on USC's 2003 Orange Bowl, 2004 Rose Bowl (he was MVP), 2005 Orange Bowl (he was MVP) and 2006 Rose Bowl teams. He was a USC captain in 2004 and 2005.

    Leinart was third nationally in passing efficiency (164.5, first in Pac-10) in 2003. He set Pac-10 season records for TD passes (38) and consecutive passes without an interception (212) in 2003. He set the USC season passing efficiency rating record (164.5) in 2003. Leinart was USC's leader in 2003 in passing (255 completions, sixth in USC history) and total offense (3,494 yards, third in USC history) in 2003.

    Leinart was ranked seventh nationally in passing efficiency (156.5, first in Pac-10) in 2004. He was USC's leader in 2004 in passing (269 completions, tied for fourth in USC history) and total offense (3,278 yards, sixth in USC history). Leinart was ranked eighth nationally in passing efficiency (157.7) in 2005. He was USC's leader in 2005 in passing (283 completions, third in USC history) and total offense (school record 3,851 yards).

    Leinart set 16 USC records, as well as 11 Pac-10 and two NCAA marks. He is ranked second on USC's career passing (807 completions, 10,693 yards) and total offense charts (10,623 yards). His career completion percentage (64.8 percent) and TD passes (99) were Pac-10 records, and his career interception percentage (1.85 percent) was an NCAA record. He had 12 300-yard passing games (a USC record) and 36 200-yard passing games (a Pac-10 record).

    Leinart was drafted in the first round of the 2006 draft by the Arizona Cardinals and played for the Cardinals (2006-09) and Texans (2010). He played in Super Bowl XLIII.

    Passing

    Year   PA   PC  PI PCT YDS  TD TCB YDS AVG TD REC YDS AVG TD

    2003 402 255  9 .634 3556 38 32  -62  -1.9     0    1      15   15.0 1

    2004 412 269 6 .653  3322 33 49  -44  -0.9     3    0       0      0.0 0

    2005 431 283 8 .657  3815 28 45   34    0.8     6    1      11   11.0 0

    ALL  1245 807 23 .648 10693 99 126 -72 -0.6 9    2      26   13.0 1

3. Mike Garrett, LHB, 1963-65

48 of 52

    USC’s first Heisman Trophy winner (1965), Mike Garrett set the standard for the modern-era “I”-formation Trojan tailbacks.

    A versatile athlete, he also started at cornerback for the Trojans and was also an All-League outfielder for USC’s baseball team (he hit .309 in 1965 and was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates and Los Angeles Dodgers).

    Garrett was an All-Pro during his eight-year NFL career with the Kansas City Chiefs and San Diego Chargers, appearing in two Super Bowls.

    I became a Trojan fan watching Mike Garrett play when I was in junior high school. It is no surprise that USC achieved great success in the following years because many future football players felt the same way.

    Heisman: 1965

    First Team All-American: 1964, 1965; 13 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1994

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1985

    National Championship: 1962

    Awards: NCAA Silver Anniversary Award in 1991, 1965 Voit Trophy (given to the outstanding player on the Pacific Coast), 1965 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), Amateur Athletic Foundation Southern California Athlete of the Year in 1965, USC’s Back of the Year Award three times (1963-65), USC’s Davis-Teschke (Most Inspirational Player) Award in 1965, USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1964 and 1965

    Highlights

    USC was 21-8-1 during his career. USC was 10th in the final AP polls in 1964 and 1965 and NC in 1962. Garrett was USC’s first Heisman Trophy winner. He began the legacy of USC’s I-formation tailbacks. He was USC’s co-captain in 1965. Garrett played in the 1965 East-West Shrine Game and 1966 Coaches All-America Game, College All-Star Game and Hula Bowl. He was selected as a 1964 and 1965 Playboy Pre-Season All-American.

    Garrett set 14 NCAA, conference and USC records in his career (including then-NCAA-record 3,221 career rushing yards). He was USC’s first 1,000-yard rusher in 38 years. Garrett had 14 100-yard rushing games in his career and was the first player to lead USC and the conference in rushing three consecutive years (833 yards in 1963, 948 yards in 1964 and NCAA-leading and USC-record 1,440 yards in 1965).

    Garrett was USC’s total offense leader in 1965 (1,482 yards). He was USC’s and conference’s scoring leader in 1964 (62 points) and 1965 (96 points). Garrett was USC’s punt return leader in 1964 (173 yards) and 1965 (235 yards). He was USC’s kickoff return leader in 1963 (352 yards) and 1964 (253 yards).

    Garrett is ranked sixth on USC’s career rushing list (3,221 yards). He is ranked 19th on USC’s career total offense list (3269 yards). Garrett is ranked seventh on USC’s career punt return list (498 yards) and 11th on USC’s kickoff return list (694 yards). Garrett is ranked 10th on USC’s season rushing list (1,440 yards in 1965). He owns the USC game record for most yards on punt returns (162 yards) and shares Pac-10 record for most punt returns for a touchdown in a game (two), both against California in 1965.

    Garrett also played cornerback on defense.

    Garrett played baseball at USC, earning All-League honors while hitting .309 in 1965 as an outfielder (he was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates and Los Angeles Dodgers).

    Nickname was "Iron Mike" or "The Duck."

    Garrett was drafted in the 1966 NFL draft by the Rams (second round) and also in the AFL draft by the Chiefs (20th round) and played for the Chiefs (1966-70) and Chargers (1970-73). He played in Super Bowls I and IV.

    Garrett was USC’s athletic director from 1993 to 2010 after serving as USC associate athletic director (1990-92). He also was director of business development for the Great Western Forum (1988-90), worked for the San Diego district attorney’s office and as a youth counselor, held management positions in the retail, construction and real estate industries and did TV football color commentary.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD 2XP PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1963 128 833 6.5      3    2     1    1 0   1.000  6   1

    1964 217 948 4.4      9    2     1    0 1      .000 0   0

    1965 267 1440 5.4  13    0     4    2 1     .500 42 2

    ALL    612 3221 5.3  25   4      6    3 2    .500 48 3

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD PR YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1963 10   78   7.8      1 14   90    6.4    0   15    352  23.5 0

    1964 17   227 13.4    1 17 173 10.2    0   10    253  23.7 0

    1965   9    94  10.4     1 13 235 18.1    2    4      89  22.3  0

    ALL   36  399  11.1     3  44 498 11.3   2  29    694  23.9 0

    Interceptions

    Year INT YDS AVG TD

    1963  1    12    12.0  0

    1964  0      0     0.0    0

    1965  0     0       0.0   0

    ALL    1    12    12.0   0

2. O.J. Simpson, LHB, 1967-68

49 of 52

    Regarded by some as the greatest college and pro football running back ever, O.J. Simpson won the 1968 Heisman Trophy.

    He is ranked No. 2 on this list because he only played at USC two years and the No. 1 choice played a more versatile role for four years.  

    A two-time All-American, he set 19 NCAA, conference and USC records, including a then-NCAA single-season rushing mark of 1,709 yards.

    He also ran for the Trojan track team and was a member of the world record-setting 440-yard relay team.

    The first pick of the 1969 NFL draft, Simpson then played 11 years in the pros with the Buffalo Bills and San Francisco 49ers, setting a since-broken NFL season rushing record of 2,003 yards in 1973. He is a member of both the College and Pro Football Halls of Fame.

    Marcus Allen told me that he became a Trojan fan in junior high school watching the Juice play at USC. I finalized my college selection based on the team that was No. 1 during my senior year of high school, and the Trojans could not have won the national championship in 1967 without Simpson.

    Heisman: 1968, Runner-up 1967

    First Team All-American: 1967, 1968; 21 teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1994

    College Football Hall of Fame: 1983

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 1985

    National Championship: 1967

    Awards: Walter Camp Award (national player of the year) in 1967 and 1968, 1968 Maxwell Award (nation’s top player), 1968 Voit Trophy (given to the outstanding player on the Pacific Coast), 1968 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1993, Amateur Athletic Foundation Southern California Athlete of the Year in 1967, USC’s MVP Award twice (1967 68), USC’s Back of the Year Award twice (1967-68), USC’s Player of the Game versus UCLA Award twice (1967-68)

    Highlights

    USC’s second Heisman Trophy winner (1968), winning the award by the most one-sided margin in history. USC was 19-2-1 in his career and won two conference titles.  USC’s 1968 team was ranked fourth in the final AP poll and NC in 1967. Simpson played in two Rose Bowls (1968 and 1969), scoring three touchdowns overall and being named Rose Bowl Player of the Game in 1968. He was USC’s co-captain in 1968. He played in the 1969 Hula Bowl. Simpson was selected as a 1968 Playboy Pre-Season All-American. 

    Simpson equaled or bettered 19 NCAA, conference and USC records in his career (including then-NCAA-record 1,709 rushing yards in 1968). He had 17 100-yard rushing games in his career. His 64-yard game-winning TD run in the fourth quarter of the 1967 UCLA game (giving USC a Rose Bowl berth and the national championship) is one of the most famous runs in college football history.

    Simpson was the NCAA’s rushing leader in 1967 (1,543 yards, eighth-most in USC history) and 1968 (1,880 yards, fourth-most in USC history). He was the NCAA’s all-purpose running leader in 1967 (1,700 yards) and 1968 (1,966 yards). Simpson was USC’s total offense leader in 1967 (1,576 yards) and 1968 (1,895 yards). He was the conference’s scoring leader in 1967 (78 points) and 1968 (138 points).

    Simpson was USC’s receiving leader in 1968 (26 catches). Simpson was USC’s kickoff return leader in 1967 (204 yards). He is ranked fifth on USC’s career rushing list (3,423 yards) and 18th on USC’s career total offense list (3,471 yards).

    Nickname was Juice.

    Simpson also ran track at USC (1967-68) and ran a leg on Troy’s world record-setting 440-yard relay team in 1967 (USC won the NCAA team title in 1967 and 1968).

    Simpson was drafted by the Bills as the No. 1 pick of the 1969 NFL draft and played for the Bills (1969-77) and 49ers (1978-79). He set the NFL season rushing record of 2,003 yards in 1973 and finished his career as the NFL’s second-leading career rusher.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1967 291 1543 5.3 13   6   3    0  .500 33   3

    1968 383 1880 4.9 23   5   1    1  .200 15   0

    ALL  674 3423 5.1 36 11  4    1  .364 48   3

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD KOR YDS AVG TD

    1967 10   109 10.9    0     8    204 25.5 0

    1968 26   211  8.1     0     7     151 21.6 0

    ALL   36    320 8.9     0     15    355 23.7 0 

1. Marcus Allen, TB-FB, 1978-81

50 of 52

    Marcus Allen was college football's first 2,000-yard rusher (2,342) when he became USC's fourth Heisman Trophy-winning tailback in 1981. He set or tied 16 NCAA records, including rushing for 200-plus yards in five consecutive games (and eight times overall in 1981).

    A four-year letterman (1978-81) and the 1981 USC captain, he still ranks second on Troy's career rushing list (4,810 yards). A versatile player, he came to USC as a defensive back and even played fullback as a 1979 sophomore (blocking for Heisman winner and fellow USC Hall of Fame inductee Charles White). Allen also led the Trojans in receiving in each of his last two seasons.

    He starred in the NFL since 1982, first with the Los Angeles Raiders and then with the Kansas City Chiefs. He was the MVP of Super Bowl XVIII. 

    He is a member of the USC, College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame.

    I watched Allen play all four years as graduate student at USC. It was easy to tell that he was special, even during his freshman year. He recently allowed me to interview him for one hour about USC and college football, and here is the series of articles that resulted:

    Running backs

    USC is best place to play football

    Lane Kiffin

    NCAA and Players Money

    Heisman: 1981

    First Team All-American: 1981; eight teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    College Football Hall of Fame: 2000

    Pro Football Hall of Fame: 2003

    National Championship: 1978

    Awards: 1981 Walter Camp Award (national player of the year), 1981 Maxwell Award (nation’s top player), 1981 Pop Warner Award (given to the most valuable senior on the Pacific Coast), Pac-10 Player of the Year in 1981, USC’s MVP in 1981, USC’s Offensive Player of the Game versus UCLA Award in 1981

    Highlights

    USC was 40-6-2 in his career. USC was second in the final AP poll in 1979, 11th in 1980, 14th in 1981 and national champions in 1978. Allen played in the 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls and 1982 Fiesta Bowl. He was a USC captain in 1981. Allen played in the 1982 Hula Bowl.

    Allen set or tied 16 NCAA records and owns 16 USC records. He was the first collegian to break 2,000 rushing yards in regular season (2,342 yards in 1981). Allen was USC’s rushing leader in 1980 (1,563 yards, seventh-best in USC history) and 1981 (2,427 yards, tops in USC history). He led the Pac-10 in rushing in 1980 (156.3 average) and 1981 (NCAA-leading 212.9 average).

    Allen was USC’s total offense leader in 1980 (1,620 yards) and 1981 (2,427 yards, 16th in USC history); USC’s receiving leader in 1980 (30 catches) and 1981 (34 catches); and USC’s scoring leader in 1980 (84 points) and 1981 (138 points). Allen led the NCAA in scoring in 1981 (12.5 average) and all-purpose running in 1980 (179.4 average) and 1981 (232.6 average). Allen is ranked second on USC’s career rushing list (4810 yards) and ninth on USC’s career total offense list (4867 yards). Allen had 21 100-yard rushing games in his career.

    Allen was drafted in the first round (10th pick) of the 1982 NFL draft by the Raiders and played for the Raiders (1982-92) and Chiefs (1993-97). He played in Super Bowl XVIII, earning MVP honors.

    After USC and the NFL, Allen became a television sports commentator.

    Rushing

    Year TCB YDS AVG TD PA PC PI PCT YDS TD

    1978   31 171  5.5     1    0    0  0 .000  0    0

    1979 114 649  5.7     8    0    0  0 .000  0    0

    1980 354 1563 4.4  14    2   2  0 1.000 57 1

    1981 433 2427 5.6  22    2    0 0 .000   0   0

    ALL    932 4810 5.2  45   4    2  0 .500 57  0

    Receiving

    Year REC YDS AVG TD

    1978  0      0     0.0    0

    1979 22   314 14.3   0

    1980 30   231 7.7     0

    1981 34   256 7.5     1

    ALL    86 801   9.3     1 

Special Honorable Mention: Brice Taylor, G, 1924-26

51 of 52

    USC's first All-American football player (1925), Brice Taylor starred at guard despite having only one hand.

    He played under two great Trojan coaches, first Elmer "Gloomy Gus" Henderson and then Howard Jones. USC went 28-6 during his playing days.

    Taylor also was on the Trojan track team in 1925.

    First Team All-American: 1925; two teams (first USC All-American)

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame: 1995

    Highlights

    USC was 28-6 in his career. Taylor played in the 1925 Christmas Festival and in the first USC-Notre Dame game (1926).

    Taylor was born without a left hand. He is a descendant of American Indian chief Tecumseh.

    Taylor also was a sprinter/hurdler on the 1925 USC track team (was a member of a world record-setting mile relay team).

    After USC, Taylor was a teacher and administrator in Los Angeles City School District, president of Guadalupe College in Texas, coached football at four colleges in the South (including Southern) and a pastor.

    Fellow B/R Featured Columnist Rick McMahan wrote a great story about Brice Taylor that is a must read.

10 Honorable Mention Trojan Football Players

52 of 52

    Taylor Mays, S, 2006-09

    All-American: 2007, 2008, 2009; 13 teams

    Roy Foster, OT, 1978-81

    All-American: 1980, 1981; six teams

    Shaun Cody, DL, 2001-04

    All-American: 2004; six teams

    USC national championships: 2003, 2004

    Jeff Bregel, OL, 1983-86

    All-American: 1985, 1986; 16 teams

    Rey Maualuga, LB, 2005-08

    All-American: 2008; 10 teams

    Awards: Chuck Bednarik

    Don Mosebar, OL, 1979-82

    All-American: 1982; seven teams

    Jesse Hibbs, OL, 1926-28

    All-American: 1927, 1928; 11 teams

    National championship: 1928

    Sam Baker, OT, 2004-07

    All-American: 2006, 2007; six teams

    National championship: 2004

    Fred Davis, TE, 2004-07

    All-American: 2007; two teams

    Awards: John Mackey

    National championship: 2004

    Adrian Young, LB, 1965-67

    All-American: 1967; nine teams

    USC Athletic Hall of Fame

    National championship: 1967