Lance Armstrong: 10 Reasons He'll Always Be Bulletproof When It Comes to Doping

Drake Oz@drakeozbrSenior Writer IIOctober 18, 2010

Lance Armstrong: 10 Reasons He'll Always Be Bulletproof When It Comes to Doping

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    NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 22:  Lance Armstrong, cyclist and founder and chairman of LIVESTRONG, looks on during the annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) September 22, 2010 in New York City. The sixth annual meeting of the CGI gathers prominent individuals in
    Mario Tama/Getty Images

    Lance Armstrong announced on Twitter earlier today that he and girlfriend Anna Hansen gave birth to their second child today: "Olivia Marie Armstrong has arrived!"

    Armstrong is certain to have the Internet abuzz over the birth of his daughter because everyone loves babies—and everyone loves Lance Armstrong.

    Never has an athlete been so close to yet still avoided public scandal like the 39-year-old cyclist.

    He really personifies that old childhood saying: "I'm rubber. You're glue. Whatever you say bounces off me and sticks to you."

    Armstrong has been bombarded with accusations of doping for as long as he's been in the sport. But he continues to avoid the same type of scrutiny that other athletes like Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds could never get away from.

    His legacy is still squeaky clean despite those who make allegations against him. Why?

    Well, let's take a look at the top 10 reasons why Lance Armstrong will always be bulletproof when it comes to doping.

10. Floyd Landis and Alberto Contador

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    PINTO, SPAIN - SEPTEMBER 30:  Alberto Contador listens to questions from the media during his press conference pleading his innocence after being tested positive for clenbuterol, a fat-burning and muscle-building drug, during this year's Tour de France, o
    Denis Doyle/Getty Images

    Nearly every accomplished cyclist has been accused of using performance-enhancing drugs, but there's one thing that separates Lance Armstrong from Floyd Landis and Alberto Contador: proof.

    Landis and Contador both failed drug tests for performance enhancers. That isn't the case with Armstrong.

    He's been called the "most tested athlete on the planet." Yet he's passed them all.

    You aren't going to find a positive drug test on Armstrong, no matter how many times Landis claims you'd be able to.

9. He Divorced His Wife for Sheryl Crow

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    NEW YORK - OCTOBER 20:  Musician Sheryl Crow and fiance cyclist Lance Armstrong arrive at the opening night party for the Rockefeller Center Ice Skating Rink on October 20, 2005 in New York City.  (Photo by Scott Gries/Getty Images)
    Scott Gries/Getty Images

    Lance Armstrong divorced his wife Kristin in 2003 and then started dating singer Sheryl Crow shortly afterward.

    Not that divorce isn't a common thing, but the guy divorced his wife, who stuck with him through the most difficult time of his life (the cancer treatment), for a D-list pop singer.

    Somehow, his public image took absolutely no hit from this. The guy is invincible.

8. He Defines Perseverance

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    NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 22:  Lance Armstrong, cyclist and founder and chairman of LIVESTRONG, looks on during the annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) September 22, 2010 in New York City. The sixth annual meeting of the CGI gathers prominent individuals in
    Mario Tama/Getty Images

    Anybody who has had cancer, or been close to someone who has, knows that there are points in time when you simply feel like giving up.

    The only thing that matters is stopping the excruciating pain that affects you day in and day out for months, years or even a lifetime.

    Lance Armstrong's testicular cancer spread to his lungs, abdomen and brain, which caused him to undergo intense surgery and chemotherapy treatments.

    Anyone who can get through that and live a highly functional life afterward is a hero. Anyone who get through that and accomplish the things Armstrong did is damn near unstoppable.

7. He's a Freak of Nature

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    PAU, FRANCE - JULY 20: American Lance Armstrong with team RadioShack rides in a breakaway during stage 16 of the Tour de France on July 20, 2010 in Pau, France. Armstrong started the ride between Bagneres-de-Luchon and Pau in 31st place. French rider Pier
    Spencer Platt/Getty Images

    Maybe it's the blue spandex outfit he sometimes wore, but Lance Armstrong has superhuman tendencies.

    The Tour de France has often been called the most grueling event in sports, but Armstrong managed to win the event seven consecutive times. When it looked like Armstrong would fail, he would pull a terrific burst of energy out of nowhere to win the race again.

    He simply baffled the mind when he overcame both mental and physical obstacles that the average person wouldn't be able to.

    Hundreds of miles of a grueling trek can't take him down. Why would a doping scandal be able to?

6. No One Cared About Cycling Until Lance Came Along

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    ARENBERG, FRANCE - JULY 06: American Lance Armstrong of team RadioShack crosses the finish of the 213km stage three of the Tour de France on July 6, 2010 in Arenberg, France. Armstrong is in 18th  place overall, 2 minutes and 30 seconds off the lead. Thor
    Spencer Platt/Getty Images

    How many people actually cared about cycling before Lance Armstrong came along?

    I'd guess cycling's popularity was somewhere below that of the MLS until Armstrong gave the country a reason to care about the sport.

    With Armstrong's inspiring story, people in the country who weren't cycling fans now had a legitimate interest in the Tour de France and the sport of cycling in general.

    Let's be real here. People weren't exactly fighting over the remote to watch cycling before Armstrong. Heck, people probably weren't fighting over it afterward.

5. He Still Competes Even Though He Doesn't Need to

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    STATION DES ROUSSES, FRANCE - JULY 10:  Lance Armstrong of the USA and Team Radioshack rides on stage seven of the 2010 Tour de France from Tournus to Station des Rousses on July 10, 2010 in Station des Rousses, France.  (Photo by Bryn Lennon/Getty Images
    Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

    Lance Armstrong has absolutely nothing left to prove in the sport of cycling.

    He's done it all, he's the best there's ever been, and that isn't going to change anytime soon.

    But Armstrong continues to participate in the sport to increase global awareness about the fight against cancer.

    He could probably spend every day for the rest of his life doing whatever he wants, but he chooses to put his body through agony in order to help others.

4. He Raced for Free

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    ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 14:  Lance Armstrong of the USA talk to the media during a press conference at the Hilton Hotel on January 14, 2010 in Adelaide, Australia. Armstrong is in Adelaide to compete in the Tour Down Under which begins next week and
    James Knowler/Getty Images

    When Armstrong announced he was coming out of retirement in 2008, it was revealed that Armstrong would not receive a salary or any bonus money.

    Sure, it's not like he needed the money whatsoever, but it's still a nice gesture in a world filled with plenty of greedy athletes.

    Somethings tells me that we wouldn't see Tiger Woods play in the Masters for free.

3. Livestrong

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    NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 22:  Lance Armstrong, cyclist and founder and chairman of LIVESTRONG, speaks during the annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) September 22, 2010 in New York City. The sixth annual meeting of the CGI gathers prominent individuals in p
    Mario Tama/Getty Images

    Livestrong bracelets have stuck around far longer than I think anyone ever thought they would.

    Of course, you could argue that the message behind them has been lost and that the bracelets are now nothing more a than brightly-colored fashion statement.

    Still, the bracelets have generated an incredible amount of money, and the Lance Armstrong Foundation—which sold the bracelets—has become one of the top 10 organizations funding cancer research in the U.S.

    I'll be honest: I'm wearing a Livestrong band right now.

2. He Was the Best in the World

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    PARIS - JULY 25:  Lance Armstrong of team Radioshack waves to fans after the twentieth and final stage of Le Tour de France 2010, from Longjumeau to the Champs-Elysees in Paris on July 25, 2010 in Paris, France.  (Photo by Bryn Lennon/Getty Images)
    Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

    The best athletes in the world incite two emotions among sports fans: They're loved or they're hated.

    There's almost no in-between on this. The greatest athletes—like Tiger Woods or LeBron James recently—are either drowned in boos or showered with cheers.

    But even if there's 25 million people who can't stand Lance Armstrong, there will be 25 million more who love him.

    This is America. We love winners—and Armstrong obviously has done plenty of that.

1. He Survived Cancer

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    MORZINE-AVORIAZ, FRANCE - JULY 11:  Lance Armstrong of the USA and Team Radio Shack crosses the finish line on stage eight of the 2010 Tour de France from Station des Rousses to Morzine-Avoriaz on July 11, 2010 in Morzine-Avoriaz, France.  (Photo by Bryn
    Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

    If there's one thing—besides winning—that people love about sports, it's a good story.

    Lance Armstrong defines what a good story is. He not only survived cancer, he survived cancer and then went on to win seven straight Tour de France titles.

    No one else in the history of the sport has ever done that, but Armstrong did it after battling back from a deadly illness.

    He gets mad props for that.