Every NBA Team's Best Free-Agent Signing of the Past Decade

Greg Swartz@@CavsGregBRCleveland Cavaliers Lead WriterAugust 7, 2020

Every NBA Team's Best Free-Agent Signing of the Past Decade

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    Beck Diefenbach/Associated Press

    The past 10 years of NBA free agency have delivered some of the best and worst contracts in league history.

    For Part 2 of this two-part miniseries, we'll be focusing on the best deals of the decade, meaning contracts that were signed from 2010-19.

    Each team's section will be broken down into three parts:

    • the total contract (years and money)
    • the amount of the contract the player actually ended up serving with the team that signed him
    • the cost per win share (money the team ended up paying the player divided by total win shares while under contract with said team).

    Beyond win shares, individual and team accolades were taken into account as well. Players signing or re-signing with teams as restricted or unrestricted free agents were eligible for this list, but extensions were excluded.

    Here's the best free-agent signing from the 2010s for every NBA team.

Atlanta Hawks: Paul Millsap

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    David Goldman/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Two years, $19 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Two years, $19 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.3 million

    After spending seven seasons with the Utah Jazz, Millsap became an All-Star after signing with the Hawks in 2013.

    Agreeing to an extremely reasonable $9.5 million per year, Millsap averaged 17.3 points, 8.1 rebounds, 3.1 assists, 1.8 steals and 1.0 blocks during his initial contract and was named an All-Star both years.

    He began taking and making more three-pointers under head coach Mike Budenholzer and was arguably the best player on the 60-win Hawks in 2014-15. A talented defender despite his modest 6'7" stature, Millsap helped turn the Hawks into the sixth-best defensive team the same year.

    Millsap would later re-sign in Atlanta for two more seasons, going 4-of-4 in All-Star appearances.

Boston Celtics: Al Horford

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    Winslow Townson/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $113 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $83.2 million

    Cost per Win Share: $3.9 million

    While Horford made the list of worst NBA contracts for his current four-year, $109 million deal with the Philadelphia 76ers, his $113 million pact with the Celtics was one of the franchise's best.

    Joining Boston the same year Isaiah Thomas averaged 28.9 points per game and finished top-five in MVP voting, Horford helped elevate the Celtics to the Eastern Conference Finals in 2017 and 2018.

    Before passing on a $30.1 million player option in 2019-20, Horford averaged 13.5 points, 7.0 rebounds, 4.6 assists and 1.2 blocks while shooting 38.2 percent from three during his three years with the Celtics. While Boston's teams featured players like Thomas, Kyrie Irving and Jayson Tatum who also gobbled up win shares, Horford was a great value even on a $100 million-plus contract.

Brooklyn Nets: Kevin Durant

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    Kathy Willens/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $164 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $37.2 million and counting

    Cost per Win Share: N/A

    While Durant has yet to play a single game for the Nets, his signing marked a shift in trajectory for a franchise that was left for dead just years before.

    Climbing up from the bottom of the East with essentially no draft picks, Brooklyn's playoff berth last season signaled a change in identity. While signing Kyrie Irving and DeAndre Jordan made people truly take notice, landing arguably the game's top overall talent (albeit while recovering from a ruptured Achilles) was a historic move for the Nets.

    Durant is still planning to start the 2020-21 season, telling The Undefeated's Marc Spears: "I'm doing well. Working out every day. I'm moving. I'm feeling like a normal player again. I'm just in my summertime routine. I'm working out every day and going to the gym in the morning. So, I feel good."

    After averaging 26.0 points, 6.4 rebounds, 5.9 assists and 1.1 blocks on 52.1 percent shooting in 2018-19, Durant should quickly establish himself as Brooklyn's best signing of the decade next season.

Charlotte Hornets: Al Jefferson

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    Chuck Burton/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $41 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $41 million

    Cost per Win Share: $2.7 million

    The Bobcats/Hornets haven't been one of the league's most attractive free-agent destinations over the last 10 years, so getting a proven big man like Jefferson was a big deal in 2013.

    Jefferson's first season in Charlotte was arguably the best of his career. He was named to the All-NBA third team with averages of 21.8 points, 10.8 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.1 blocks, and he shot 50.9 percent from the field.

    An old-school, back-to-the-basket power forward, Jefferson took the Bobcats from 21 to 43 victories, making the playoffs just two years after the team went 7-59.

Chicago Bulls: Pau Gasol

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    Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $22 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Two years, $14.6 million

    Cost per Win Share: $0.83 million

    While he didn't sign with Chicago until his age-34 season, Gasol quickly proved he had plenty left in the tank and outplayed his $7.3 million average annual salary.

    After missing the All-Star Game the previous three years, Gasol was selected both seasons he played for the Bulls, putting up 17.6 points, 11.4 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 2.0 blocks per contest. He also began to expand his game to the three-point line.

    Together with a core of Derrick Rose and Jimmy Butler, Gasol would turn his last full-time starting job into a memorable one in Chicago before opting out of the final year of his deal to sign with the San Antonio Spurs.

Cleveland Cavaliers: LeBron James

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    Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Two years, $47 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $23 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.7 million

    James technically signed three contracts in his four years with the Cavs from 2014-18, taking advantage of a rising salary cap.

    His most valuable came for the 2015-16 season, appropriately enough paying him $23 million for a year in which he averaged 25.3 points, 7.4 rebounds, 6.8 assists and 1.4 steals and led the Cavs to the first title in franchise history.

    He won Finals MVP for the third time in his career, and there has been no better signing in Cavs history.

Dallas Mavericks: Dirk Nowtizki

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    LM Otero/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $80 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Four years, $80 million

    Cost per Win Share: $2.3 million

    Dallas hasn't been shy about handing out big contracts, giving hefty deals to players like Chandler Parsons, Harrison Barnes, Wesley Matthews, DeAndre Jordan and Kristaps Porzingis this decade.

    No contract has been as important for the franchise as Nowitzki agreeing to re-sign in 2010, however.

    From 2010-14, Nowitzki made three All-Star teams, averaged 21.2 points per game and won MVP of the 2011 NBA Finals. The best player in team history delivering the franchise's first and only title pretty much makes him a lock for the best signing, especially during a year in which he made $17.3 million.

Denver Nuggets: Paul Millsap

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $90 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $90 million

    Cost per Win Share: $7.4 million

    At over $7 million per win share, Millsap isn't the biggest bargain on this list. But his impact in helping turn the Nuggets into a powerhouse in the West can't be measured.

    After signing for far less with the Atlanta Hawks, Millsap cashed in with Denver in 2017. The Nuggets went from a winning percentage of .488 before Millsap to .561, .659 and now .662 this year. On a predominantly young core, Millsap has been the veteran starter, leader and defender the team needed him to be, and it likely wouldn't be third in the West without his presence.

    Even when given the chance to clear up major cap space last summer, the Nuggets still chose to pick up the then-34-year-old's $30.5 million team option, a smart move given his plus-10.2 net rating swing this season.

Detroit Pistons: Derrick Rose

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Two years, $15 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $7.3 million and counting

    Cost per Win Share: $2.9 million

    The Pistons' best signing of the decade was a recent one, coming when they recruited veteran point guard and former MVP Rose away from the Minnesota Timberwolves.

    On a Detroit team that lost Blake Griffin to injury, traded Andre Drummond and waived Reggie Jackson, Rose's play was one of the only bright spots as he averaged 18.1 points and 5.6 assists, primarily in a sixth-man role.

    The Pistons could keep Rose and look to improve the team through free agency or use his friendly contract to lure some draft picks or young players away from a contender.

Golden State Warriors: Kevin Durant

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    Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Two years, $54.3 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $26.5 million

    Cost per Win Share: $2.2 million

    From a post-Finals-loss phone call from Draymond Green to a $24.1 million jump in the salary cap during the 2016 offseason, stars had to align for Durant to sign with the Warriors.

    Like LeBron James with the Cleveland Cavaliers from 2014-18, Durant chose to sign multiple short deals during his time with the Dubs. His first contract in Golden State was his best as the 2016-17 Warriors became one of the best teams of all time, with Durant winning Finals MVP.

    Durant averaged 28.5 points, 7.9 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.3 blocks while shooting 55.6 percent from the floor during Golden State's playoff run, leading them to a 14-1 record in his appearances.

Houston Rockets: Patrick Beverley

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    Michael Wyke/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $2 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $2 million

    Cost per Win Share: $0.2 million

    James Harden has only signed extensions with the Rockets and Russell Westbrook's current deal was signed with the Oklahoma City Thunder, making both ineligible for this list.

    In terms of bargains that produced the most win shares, Beverley could actually qualify twice.

    Before agreeing to a four-year, $23 million deal in 2015, Beverley originally joined the Rockets out of Spartak St. Petersburg in Russia after he was named EuroCup MVP for the 2011-12 season. He quickly became one of the NBA's best on-ball defenders, earning the Rockets' starting point guard job alongside Harden while making less than $1 million per year.

Indiana Pacers: Bojan Bogdanovic

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    Carlos Osorio/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Two years, $21 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Two years, $21 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.7 million

    David West could certainly qualify here as well. His signing with the Pacers in 2011 helped Indiana go on multiple deep playoff runs led by Paul George.

    While West was an established star when he joined Indiana for his age-31 campaign, Bogdanovic was more of an unknown following a season with the Brooklyn Nets and Washington Wizards. The Pacers' offer of $21 million seemed more than fair at the time, yet it turned into a team-friendly contract.

    Bogdanovic became the second-leading scorer for a pair of playoff teams in Indiana while also proving himself as one of the league's best three-point shooters (41.3 percent on 4.8 attempts per game).

Los Angeles Clippers: Kawhi Leonard

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    Mark J. Terrill/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $103 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $32.7 million and counting

    Cost per Win Share: $4.0 million

    Even if it cost the team five first-round draft picks, two pick swaps, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander and Danilo Gallinari in a trade for Paul George, getting the chance to sign a prime Finals MVP in Leonard was worth it.

    Getting Leonard and George last summer marked the best offseason in Clippers history, and that's true even before we get to see how the 2019-20 season ends.

    Leonard is averaging a career-high 26.8 points to go along with 7.2 rebounds, 4.9 assists and 1.8 steals per game, and he was named an All-Star for the fourth time. His ultimate success in L.A. will depend on postseason play, but that's an area in which Leonard has thrived time and time again.

Los Angeles Lakers: LeBron James

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    Ashley Landis/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $154 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Two years, $73.1 million and counting

    Cost per Win Share: $4.33 million

    More than just signing the best player in the NBA, getting James to join the Lakers signaled the end of a long and ugly rebuild.

    While his first season with the Lakers ended in injury and a failure to reach the postseason, James and L.A. recently locked up the No. 1 seed in a loaded Western Conference.

    Playing his age-34 and -35 seasons, James has given the Lakers 26.3 points, 8.2 rebounds, 9.4 assists and 1.3 steals per game, even leading the NBA in assists (10.3 per game) this year.

Memphis Grizzlies: Tony Allen

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    Danny Johnston/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $9.7 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $9.7 million

    Cost per Win Share: $0.7 million

    Even though he had proved himself a valuable rotation guard with the Boston Celtics, Allen didn't become the Grindfather until he signed in Memphis.

    A starter on some of the best Grizzlies teams in franchise history, Allen signed in Memphis in 2010 and would be named to the All-Defensive team during all three years of his $9.7 million deal. He also improved Memphis by 5.7 points per 100 possessions when he was on the court during the length of the contract despite possessing a limited offensive game.

    Allen has now become one of the most beloved players in Grizzlies history and was viewed as one of the league's toughest defensive players throughout his time in Memphis.

Miami Heat: LeBron James

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    Alan Diaz/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Six years, $110 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Four years, $67.1 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.0 million

    James was technically part of a sign-and-trade when joining the Heat in 2010, but he had already agreed to sign with Miami before a deal was worked out with the Cleveland Cavaliers.

    No other player on a $100 million-plus deal has equaled the $1.0 million-per-win share mark James did over his four years in Miami, a figure almost exclusively seen from players on rookie or minimum contracts.

    During his physical peak, James led Miami to two championships and four Finals appearances in four years, taking home a pair of Finals MVPs. Even for a team that also signed Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh to historic deals, his contract stands alone.

Milwaukee Bucks: Brook Lopez

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    Ashley Landis/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: One year, $3.4 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $3.4 million

    Cost per Win Share: $0.5 million

    While Lopez's current four-year, $52 million contract should also turn out well for the Bucks, his one-year, $3.4 million deal in 2018 was one of the best signings of the decade.

    Lopez became the perfect starting center next to Giannis Antetokounmpo as a tremendous rim protector who could space the floor and made 36.5 percent of his threes. Averaging 12.5 points and 4.9 rebounds in his 28.7 minutes per game, he helped take the Bucks from 44 to 60 wins and the No. 1 seed in the Eastern Conference.

    After he dramatically outplayed his contract in 2018-19, the Bucks rewarded him with the $52 million deal last summer.

Minnesota Timberwolves: Derrick Rose

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    Jim Mone/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: One year, $2.1 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $2.1 million

    Cost per Win Share: $0.7 million

    After it looked like Rose could be out of the league following a release from the Utah Jazz in 2018, a nine-game stint at the end of the 2017-18 season was enough to convince the Timberwolves to bring back the former MVP in 2018-19.

    A minimum deal seemed like a safe bet, even though Rose had averaged just 5.8 points and 1.2 assists with the Wolves the season before.

    Rose rewarded Minnesota for its confidence with averages of 18.0 points, 2.7 rebounds and 4.3 assists in his 51 games, even recording the highest true shooting percentage of his career (55.7 percent).

New Orleans Pelicans: Jrue Holiday

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    Rusty Costanza/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Five years, $125 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $77.8 million and counting

    Cost per Win Share: $4.7 million

    A $125 million deal for a player coming off a season in which he averaged just 15.4 points per game seemed like an overpay, but Holiday's play on both ends of the ball has made it New Orleans' best signing of the decade.

    Since agreeing to the deal, Holiday is averaging 19.8 points, 4.8 rebounds, 6.8 assists and 1.6 steals while shooting 47.5 percent from the field. He's guided the Pelicans from the Anthony Davis era to the Zion Williamson era, all while playing outstanding defense.

    Holiday's value was especially clear during the 2018 postseason as he gave New Orleans 23.7 points, 5.7 rebounds and 6.3 assists per game on 51.8 percent shooting in nine playoff appearances.

New York Knicks: Carmelo Anthony

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    Winslow Townson/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Five years, $120 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $69.9 million

    Cost per Win Share: $5.0 million

    Finding a good contract on the Knicks in the past decade is indeed like finding a needle in a haystack. JR Smith's two-year, $5.7 million deal in 2012 drew real consideration here.

    In the end, no player has made a bigger impact in the 2010s than Anthony, and his $120 million deal in 2014 at least started out strong.

    Anthony was named an All-Star for the first three years of the deal while still with the Knicks, and he averaged 22.6 points, 6.8 rebounds and 3.4 assists, albeit on just 43.6 percent shooting from the floor. New York traded him to the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2017, ending a six-and-a-half-year run with the Knicks.

Oklahoma City Thunder: Paul George

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    Alonzo Adams/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $137 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $30.6 million

    Cost per Win Share: $2.6 million

    Since Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook only technically signed extensions in OKC, George functions as the team's best free-agent signing.

    Knowing he could leave in a year when they traded Victor Oladipo and Domantas Sabonis for him in 2017, the Thunder surprised the NBA when they got the All-Star forward to re-up instead of joining a big-market team the following summer.

    George's 2017-18 season was one for the ages. He finished third in MVP voting while averaging 28.0 points, 8.2 rebounds, 4.1 assists and a league-leading 2.2 steals.

    Even after he requested a trade just a year after signing this deal, OKC was able to get five first-round picks, two pick swaps, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander and Danilo Gallinari from the Los Angeles Clippers and stay in the Western Conference playoff picture.

    Even though he's no longer on the roster, the Thunder are still benefiting from the George signing.

Orlando Magic: Nikola Vucevic

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    Brandon Dill/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $100 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $28 million and counting

    Cost per Win Share: $4.6 million

    Spending seven seasons with the Magic after he was a part of the Dwight Howard trade in 2012, Vucevic entered unrestricted free agency in 2019 following his first All-Star appearance.

    The Magic did the smart thing and kept him in central Florida, signing him to a four-year deal that decreases in value annually. While he earned $28 million this season, the final year of Vucevic's $100 million contract will only cost Orlando $22 million.

    Averaging 19.5 points, 10.9 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 0.8 blocks in the first year of his new deal, Vucevic is still just 29 and should live up to the length of the contract for a team that could use another big free-agent signing, preferably one on the wing.

Philadelphia 76ers: Robert Covington

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    Matt Slocum/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $3.0 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $3.0 million

    Cost per Win Share: $0.3 million

    Covington has been on bargain contracts for nearly his entire career, especially after he signed his first deal with Philly.

    During his three-year, $3 million contract from 2014-17, Covington averaged 13.1 points, 5.7 rebounds, 1.6 steals and 0.7 blocks while shooting 35.4 percent from three. One of the lone bright spots during the Sixers' long rebuilding process, he would later turn his early strong play into his current four-year, $62 million deal.

    For a Philly team that's recently given out nine-figure deals to Al Horford and Tobias Harris, picking up Covington as a free agent in 2014 following just seven career games with the Houston Rockets has been the franchise's best signing of the decade.

Phoenix Suns: Goran Dragic

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    Jonathan Bachman/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $30 million

    Contract Spent with Team: 2.5 years, $19.8 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.0 million

    Ricky Rubio was the Suns' big free-agent splash a year ago, but Dragic stands out as the team's best signing of the 2010s.

    The Slovenian guard averaged as much as 20.3 points, 7.4 assists and 1.6 steals in his two-and-half years, a tenure that would eventually end when the Suns decided their three-point guard experiment wasn't working and traded him to the Miami Heat.

    Winning the league's Most Improved Player award and making third-team All-NBA in 2013-14, Dragic was a fantastic signing for the Suns.

Portland Trail Blazers: Wesley Matthews

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    Don Ryan/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Five years, $34 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Five years, $34 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.1 million

    The Blazers signed Matthews to a $34 million offer sheet in 2010, and the Utah Jazz chose not to match following a rookie season in which he scored just 9.4 points per game as a part-time starter.

    That proved to be a mistake for the Jazz as Matthews became the Blazers' starting shooting guard for the next five years, averaging 15.4 points, 3.3 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 1.2 steals while shooting 39.4 percent from three.

    A torn Achilles in March 2015 effectively ended his career in Portland, but not before the Blazers got their money's worth from Matthews' deal and its $6.8 million average annual value.

Sacramento Kings: Darren Collison

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    Steve Yeater/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Three years, $16 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Three years, $16 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.24 million

    The Kings have made some regrettable free-agent signings over the last 10 years, including last summer. Between giving Harrison Barnes a four-year, $85 million contract and trading both Trevor Ariza and Dewayne Dedmon just months after signing them, 2019 wasn't a great summer in Sacramento.

    Getting Collison for just over $5 million per year in 2014 turned out to be a great deal for the Kings, however, as he started 124 games at point guard over the next three seasons.

    Averaging 14.2 points, 4.7 assists and 1.1 steals while shooting 39.8 percent from three, Collison had a net rating swing of plus-3.0 during his time with the Kings.

San Antonio Spurs: LaMarcus Aldridge

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    Eric Gay/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $80 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Four years, $80 million

    Cost per Win Share: $2.1 million

    While the Spurs have largely depended on the draft and their tremendous player development and coaching for decades of success, San Antonio landed one of the biggest free agents of 2015.

    Aldridge's first contract featured three All-Star appearances, two spots on All-NBA teams and averages of 20.0 points, 8.4 rebounds and 1.2 blocks on 50.6 percent shooting from the field.

    The big man helped the Spurs stay competitive after losing Tim Duncan to retirement, Tony Parker to free agency and Kawhi Leonard to a questionable trade. Still playing at a high level at age 35 before undergoing shoulder surgery, Aldridge agreed to a two-year, $50 million contract extension in 2017 that will keep him with the Spurs through next season.

Toronto Raptors: Bismack Biyombo

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    Tony Dejak/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Two years, $5.8 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $3 million

    Cost per Win Share: $0.5 million

    Whether Kyle Lowry, DeMar DeRozan, Kawhi Leonard or Pascal Siakam, the Raptors have primarily drafted or traded for their stars.

    Before signing one of the NBA's worst deals (a four-year, $72 million contract with the Orlando Magic), Biyombo was one of the league's best bargains in 2015-16.

    A defensive enforcer on Toronto's playoff team, he averaged 5.5 points, 8.0 rebounds and 1.6 blocks on 54.2 percent shooting. His stock shot up in the postseason, helped in part by a 26-rebound, four-block performance in a win over the eventual champion Cleveland Cavaliers.

    The Raptors were wise not to match money with the Magic and instead only got Biyombo at the right price for 2015-16.

Utah Jazz: Bojan Bogdanovic

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    Eric Christian Smith/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Four years, $73.1 million

    Contract Spent with Team: One year, $17 million and counting

    Cost per Win Share: $4.0 million

    Making his second appearance on this list, Bogdanovic was a huge signing for the Jazz last summer.

    Before undergoing wrist surgery, the 31-year-old forward was second on the Jazz in scoring, putting up a career-high 20.2 points per game. His 41.4 percent mark from three was 11th in the NBA among qualified shooters, and Utah was 8.0 points per 100 possessions better with Bogdanovic on the floor.

    The Jazz need floor-spacing around Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert, and Bogdanovic will provide it at either forward position for years to come.

Washington Wizards: Marcin Gortat

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    Nick Wass/Associated Press

    Contract Signed: Five years, $60 million

    Contract Spent with Team: Four years, $46.4 million

    Cost per Win Share: $1.7 million

    Following a trade from the Phoenix Suns, Gortat was given a one-year trial with the Wizards before he hit free agency. Afterward, both parties agreed staying together was for the best.

    In four years on his new contract, Gortat gave Washington 11.2 points, 9.1 rebounds and 1.0 blocks per game while hitting 56.0 percent of his shots from the field and providing John Wall and Bradley Beal with plenty of hard screens around which they could operate.

    Gortat's durability was especially important. He played all 82 games in three of the four years on the new deal, missing just seven total contests.

         

    Unless otherwise noted, stats accurate heading into Thursday's games and courtesy of Basketball Reference.