B/R NFL Draft 400: Top Wide Receivers for 2015

Matt Miller@nfldraftscoutNFL Draft Lead WriterApril 15, 2015

B/R NFL Draft 400: Top Wide Receivers for 2015

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    Patrick Smith/Getty Images

    Each spring, 256 players are drafted into the NFL, with roughly another 100 added as undrafted free agents. With close to 350 players joining the pros each year, it's tough to keep track of them.

    Everyone knows who Jameis Winston, Marcus Mariota and Amari Cooper are. But what about the rest of the class? At Bleacher Report, our aim is to thoroughly cover the draft unlike any other outlet, so we're not stopping with coverage of the top 32 picks or even the top 200 picks. We're covering the top 400 draft-eligible players, with a full scouting report on each one. 

    The top 400 players have been tracked, scouted, graded and ranked by myself and my scouting assistants, Marshal Miller and Dan Bazal. Together, we have viewed a minimum of three games per player (the same standard NFL teams use), and oftentimes we've seen every play from a player over the last two years. That's led to the grades, rankings and scouting reports you see here.

    Players are graded on strengths and weaknesses, with a pro-player comparison added that matches the player's style or fit in the pros. Position by position, the top 400 players are broken down for easy viewing before the final release of a top-400 big board before the draft.

    In the case of a tie, players were ranked based on their overall grade.

The Grading Scale

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press

    At the end of each scouting report, you'll see a Final Grade that falls somewhere between 9.00 and 4.00 on a unique grading scale. This scale comes from the teaching I had from Charley Casserly, Michael Lombardi and other former and current front office personnel in the NFL. I've tweaked it this year to be more transparent, and the result is each player receiving a number grade as well as his ranking.

    This applies to all positions.

    Matt Miller Draft Grading Scale
    GradeLabel
    9.00Elite, No. 1 pick
    8.00-8.99 All-Pro Potential 
    7.50-7.99Pro Bowl Potential 
    7.00-7.49Top-15 Player Potential 
    6.50-6.99Rookie Impact/Future Starter 
    6.00-6.49Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    5.50-5.99Future Starter
    5.10-5.49Quality Backup
    5.01-5.09Backup Caliber
    5.00Draftable Player Cutoff
    4.75-4.99Priority Free Agent
    4.50-4.74Camp Player
    4.00-4.49Not NFL Caliber

57. Ezell Ruffin, San Diego State

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.68s 17 Reps 27.5" 110.0" 7.35s

    STRENGTHS

    A physical, strong receiver, Ezell Ruffin is a vertical threat with big-play potential. He has solid build-up speed with a long stride and a thick lower body that lets him run through traffic. He has top-level hands and tracks the ball well over either shoulder, with the catch radius to help out his quarterback on errant throws. Ruffin makes himself a target and will also help out as a blocker in the run game or after the catch.

    WEAKNESSES

    Plain and simple, Ruffin lacks the speed to be a draftable prospect. His 6'0", 218-pound frame has to move faster to generate separation in the NFL. He's not a shifty player off the line of scrimmage and will get punched and jammed with ease by NFL cornerbacks. He has limited production as a scorer and doesn't pull away from coverage (zone or man). Ruffin also missed five games with a broken collarbone in his senior year.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     26 422 2

    FINAL GRADE: 4.80/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

56. Levi Norwood, Baylor

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    Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.57s - 34.5" 123.0" 6.78s

    STRENGTHS

    A return man with upside at receiver, Levi Norwood has experience playing inside and outside receiver. He has the hands to be a threat as a possession receiver and looks the ball in cleanly. Norwood's lack of top-end athleticism makes him a better threat against zone coverage, where he shows good route awareness to sit down and find holes in the defense. He's a threat after the catch and did show some burst in the open field.

    WEAKNESSES

    Norwood doesn't have the pure speed most look for in a return man. His 4.57 pro day 40 time isn't good for a 6'2", 200-pound receiver. He plays at that speed too and consistently lost playing time and targets in the Baylor offense to younger, more explosive players. Norwood doesn't have the twitch to get open at the top of his route stem, and you don't see the suddenness needed to break free on underneath routes. Add in poor play power, and it's easy to see why his 2014 playing time and and production dropped off.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     35 319 2

    FINAL GRADE: 4.80/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

55. Matt Miller, Boise State

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    Jessica Hill/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.79s 9 Reps 34.0" 114.0" 7.13s

    STRENGTHS

    A tall, physical receiver with an NFL frame (6'3", 213 lbs), Matt Miller has production at Boise State to match his frame. A four-year starter, Miller has polish as a route-runner and solid hands working back to the ball. He's able to box out defenders on slants and comeback routes. Miller has a frame that can get bigger and stronger. He's a smart, instinctive player best suited to work against zone coverage.

    WEAKNESSES

    A high ankle sprain ended Miller's season after five games, limiting his ability to showcase his skills. He lacks the speed of an NFL receiver, with 4.79 seconds as his best 40 attempt at his pro day, and doesn't show the juice on underneath routes to consistently get open. Pre-injury, Miller was already a heavy-footed mover into and out of his breaks with limited hip flexibility. He's a possession-style receiver only, with very questionable separation skills or play strength.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     28 461 3

    FINAL GRADE: 4.90/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

54. Donatella Luckett, Harding

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    Brynn Anderson/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.37s 18 Reps 35.5" 120.0" 7.28s

    STRENGTHS

    A Senior Bowl invite from a small school, Donatella Luckett was a two-time first-team All-Great American Conference (2014, 2013) and grabbed a second-team honor as a sophomore. He has three years of starting experience and top-tier speed in the open field. Luckett gets to his top gear in a hurry, and his status as a sprinter on the track team at Harding shows up. He destroyed Division II competition and flashes explosive potential down the field and as a return man.

    WEAKNESSES

    Drops were too often an issue for Luckett at the Senior Bowl when facing top-tier competition for the first time. He's coming out of an option-based offense that didn't teach him how to be a route-runner. Luckett needs polish and has to learn to use his frame when running routes to create separation and get away from defenders who can match his speed.

    Luckett is a long-shot developmental prospect who lacks NFL skills as a route-runner, but if he hits on his projection, he could be a stud.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     23 602 5

    FINAL GRADE: 4.90/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

53. Keith Mumphery, Michigan State

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    Brandon Wade/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.54s - 32.5" 121.0" 7.07s

    STRENGTHS

    A hard worker with a great motor, Keith Mumphery may will his way onto an NFL roster. He has good size (6'0", 215 lbs) and solid hands. He fights for positioning and isn't afraid to get physical off the line of scrimmage or when asked to go over the middle. He plays with a chip on his shoulder and won't back down from tacklers or cover men. He could work his way into a rotation in the slot, especially on a team that values run blocking from the receiver position.

    WEAKNESSES

    Athletically, Mumphery falls short of expectations. He lacks the speed to separate down the field and doesn't have the twitch to break free underneath. Mumphery peaked early at Michigan State and saw his playing time decrease in his junior and season seasons. His best bet will be contributing as a special teams ace and potential depth as a possession receiver.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     26 495 3

    FINAL GRADE: 4.90/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

52. Da'Ron Brown, Northern Illinois

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    David J. Phillip/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.54s 17 Reps 37.0" 120.0" 7.04s

    STRENGTHS

    A former high school quarterback, Da'Ron Brown has the skills to get a look in the NFL. He showed solid hands at the NFL Scouting Combine and performed well in the gauntlet. Brown's best quality is his ability to make every catch. He makes himself a big target and uses his length (32-inch arms) and big hands (10 ¼ inches) to secure the ball. He's sure-handed and has a catch radius that makes quarterbacks love him. He's quicker than fast and will make plays in the open field with the ball in his hands.

    WEAKNESSES

    Brown was billed as a speed receiver in the scouting community but ran a 4.54-second 40 in Indianapolis. He doesn't look like a speed receiver and can't carry defenders over the top. With a 6'0", 205-pound frame he's not a physical player and will get jammed at the line with ease. The ability to separate and consistently get open is a major issue for Brown's prospects due to a lack of athleticism and because he wasn't asked to run many routes at NIU.

    He's raw with baseline athleticism, and most NFL teams would rather bet on a plus athlete at this stage of the draft.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     68 1,065 6

    FINAL GRADE: 4.95/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

51. Kasen Williams, Washington

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    Elaine Thompson/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.60s 17 Reps 35.0" 119.0" 7.10s

    STRENGTHS

    Kasen Williams was a potential first-rounder in 2013 before suffering a broken leg and foot injury. He didn't look the same in 2014 after returning to the field. Williams has size (6'3", 217 lbs) and can make defenders miss after the catch. He was a stud as a sophomore and showed strength to beat defenders off the ball and enough build-up speed to carry them downfield. Williams has good hands with a big catch radius and the length to be a jump-ball threat.

    WEAKNESSES

    A broken fibula and Lisfranc injury cut Williams' 2013 season short and ended what was a brilliant year for him. He came back to the field with a loss of burst and top-end speed. Williams didn't look comfortable as a runner and struggled to separate from coverage because of it. Teams must do background work on if Williams is still in love with the game and mentally ready to compete post-injury, because he didn't look it in his senior season.

    With just 20 catches this past season, Williams has to prove he's durable and that he'll bounce back with more time away from his injury.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     20 189 2

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

50. Deontay Greenberry, Houston

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    Ray Carlin-USA TODAY Sports
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.50s 21 Reps 35.5" 116.0" 7.23s

    STRENGTHS

    An early entry into the 2015 draft, Deontay Greenberry looks NFL-caliber in his 2013 film. He had consistent production at Houston, notching 154 catches over the last two seasons with 17 touchdowns. Greenberry looks the part on the hoof at 6'3" and 200 pounds, and he plays with that size and strength. His ability to pull in tough catches is all over the film, and Greenberry does make the highlight-reel reception. He had a good pro day showing, with a 4.50-second 40 and 21 bench-press reps of 225 pounds.

    WEAKNESSES

    A non-combine invite as an underclassman, Greenberry had a bad 2014 season. He looked sluggish and uninterested, with far too many concentration drops and a lack of urgency in his game. He has one speed as a route-runner and doesn't break off routes with a sink in his hips. Greenberry had 11 drops per our charting and lacks the consistency as a catcher to turn heads.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     72 841 6

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

49. Cam Worthy, East Carolina

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    TOM UHLMAN/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     - 12 Reps - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A big receiver with long arms and big hands, Cam Worthy looks the part at 6'2" and 211 pounds. He's able to get off the turf and make contested catches, using his size well to dominate over the top. He's like a power forward down the field and will use his length with good body control and awareness. Worthy has good football smarts to break off routes, and he works back to the ball well on comeback routes.

    WEAKNESSES

    Worthy lacks the speed to get open in the NFL and will be limited to a jump-ball player. He's a replaceable athlete with no redeeming skills. Underneath routes will be a chore for him with long, heavy steps. Worthy can get pressed at the line because teams don't respect his deep speed, and he doesn't have the quickness to juke at the line. Worthy was suspended for two games in 2014 after a verbal altercation with a student. Due to a foot injury, Worthy has been unable to perform any running workouts pre-draft.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     55 1,016 4

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

48. Andre Davis, South Florida

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    Chris O'Meara/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.60s - 32.5" 118.0" 7.06s

    STRENGTHS

    The team MVP at South Florida, Andre Davis has experience and production. Davis makes his money down the field and has blossomed into a good deep threat. He uses his length well and has nice build-up speed on a long stride. He's a football-smart player with instincts to read the defense and break off his routes as needed. He's a clean catcher with a big catch radius and the vision to track the ball over either shoulder. He uses his hands well to lock the ball up and will make plays away from his body, showing adjustment to poor passes.

    WEAKNESSES

    Davis missed four games with a sternum injury in 2014. At 6'1" and 205 pounds, he has to be faster and more agile in the open field. Davis doesn't have the strength to muscle his way open against press coverage and lacks the speed to take the top off the defense—so where do you play him? The South Florida offense was not very sophisticated, and he's a raw route-runner on more advanced breaking routes.

    Davis has to learn to attack contested passes given his lack of speed, as his current film shows a timid player when the ball is in the air.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     36 594 7

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

47. Jaxon Shipley, Texas

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    Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.49s 10 Reps 35.0" 120.0" 6.93s

    STRENGTHS

    A legacy player whose brother (Jordan) played at Texas and whose dad was a high school coach and current Texas coach. Shipley wowed with a pro-day performance that put him back on the map, showing excellent agility and explosive skills with good enough speed. He has sure hands and is a tough competitor underneath. He won't get timid before or after the catch.

    Shipley can play outside or in the slot, but he looks like a slot receiver for the NFL. He's football smart and notices holes in the defense, making him a threat against zone coverage.

    WEAKNESSES

    Shipley didn't have the production at Texas most expected and struggled to live up to his brother's impact. He isn't a great route-runner and needs to work on timing to break off routes more cleanly. A lack of bulk makes him a liability against press coverage, and he has to learn to work free using his hands and also by not getting tapped at the line. His lack of top-end speed makes him a very scheme-specific player.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     59 577 1

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

46. Jordan Taylor, Rice

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    Chris O'Meara/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.50s 9 Reps 36.5" 122.0" 6.69s

    STRENGTHS

    A big receiver with impressive athleticism, Jordan Taylor is a sleeper in this receiver class. He had consistent production at Rice, going over 800 yards in three straight seasons, and knows how to get open. Taylor flashed on the scene with a good Shrine Game performance, and with a 6'5", 210-pound frame, he's turning heads in the red zone. He has build-up speed and gets low when breaking off routes at the top of his route stem.

    Taylor can be a threat in the end zone and has the height, length and vertical to be a threat on contested catches.

    WEAKNESSES

    Taylor's height works against him at the line of scrimmage, where he's a huge target for cornerbacks who want to get into his frame and jam him up. He's long and lean and doesn't have the play power to rub cornerbacks and get physical at the point of attack. Taylor doesn't show the short-area quickness or twitch to get open underneath and will be limited to deep or jump-ball situations.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     54 842 7

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

45. Kaelin Clay, Utah

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    Ethan Miller/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.51s 10 Reps 33.0" 113.0" 6.97s

    STRENGTHS

    An electric return man with open-field vision and moves, Kaelin Clay will get a shot in the NFL. Clay's 4.46-second 40-yard dash time at his pro day is more in line with his game film. He's sudden and twitchy in the open field and can make defenders miss with speed or agility.

    He can open up and take the top off the defense (see the Oregon game) and tracks the ball well away from his frame. He'll offer immediate contributions as a return man (he had three punts returned for scores in 2014) and can develop into a threat from the slot.

    WEAKNESSES

    Clay played just one year of FBS football after transferring from Mt. San Antonio Junior College. His film shows drops in the middle of the field and on the sideline—largely due to trying to get upfield before securing the ball.

    He doesn't have great foot speed to get open underneath, and his stiff hips make him a limited change-of-direction route-runner. His short, choppy steps lead to a delay when breaking on routes and allow defenders to stick in his pocket. Clay's routes don't convince that he'll be able to get open in the NFL.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     43 523 4

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

44. J.J. Nelson, UAB

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    Wesley Hitt/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.28s - 36.0" 127.0" 7.02s

    STRENGTHS

    When you run a 4.28 in the 40-yard dash, you get noticed. J.J. Nelson is a burner with legitimate sprinter speed. As a receiver, he has good hands and will go over the middle to bring the ball down in traffic. On deep routes, he can eat up a cushion and blow past defenders, and he tracks the ball well over his shoulder. Nelson also brings return skills and returned four kicks for touchdowns as a senior.

    WEAKNESSES

    Nelson is built like a high school player at 5'10" and 156 pounds. He has a very narrow, thin frame that couldn't support much more weight. Nelson is straight-line fast and lacks the jitterbug qualities to make defenders miss after the catch. His thin frame makes him a liability over the middle, and a lack of play strength means he'll struggle to get off the ball if jammed.

    Nelson may never be more than a return man in the pros.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     35 655 4

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

43. Austin Hill, Arizona

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    Christian Petersen/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.57s 17 Reps 36.5" 129.0" 6.65s

    STRENGTHS

    Austin Hill is a big, physical receiver with experience on the edge and in the slot. Going back to 2012, he showed promise as a playmaking wide receiver, with over 1,300 yards to his credit. He's a natural catcher who looks the ball in cleanly and won't make senseless drops.

    Hill plays big and looks to punish defenders before and after the catch. He has a muscular, fat-free physique, and his work ethic shows in his strength.

    WEAKNESSES

    Hill missed the 2013 season with a torn ACL and didn't look the same in his senior year. His lack of top-end speed was definitely affected by the injury, and his pro day time of 4.57 seconds in the 40 isn't good for his size (6'2", 212 lbs). Can he get open in the NFL? His ability to get open vertically is in question, and his underneath quickness was never great.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     49 635 4

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

42. George Farmer, USC

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    Mark J. Terrill/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.35s 19 Reps - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A big, thick receiver (6'1", 220 lbs) with the size to beat up NFL cornerbacks, George Farmer is an intriguing prospect. Farmer blew away the USC pro day with unofficial 4.32- and 4.35-second times in the 40-yard dash, showing the speed to take over the defense.

    Farmer played outside receiver at USC and projects there in the NFL as an immediate deep threat. He was high school teammates with Marqise Lee, Robert Woods and Paul Richardson, which might be the best high school receiver corps ever.

    WEAKNESSES

    A stud high school recruit, Farmer left USC early and didn't get a combine invite. He's incredibly raw as anything other than a 9-route receiver and lacks polish across the board, with just one year of production. He missed the 2013 season with a torn MCL and ACL.

    Farmer was able to win in college on pure athleticism and has to work to become a better route-runner before he can play in the NFL. He's a total projection after showing so little at USC, and his tested time isn't what he showed on tape.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     25 314 4

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

     

    Pro-day results via Rob Rang of CBS Sports.

41. Chris Harper, Cal

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    Jeff Chiu/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.52s 11 Reps 35." 120.0" 7.03s

    STRENGTHS

    An impressive route-runner who shows up quicker than fast, Chris Harper can beat press coverage or eat up a cushion. Harper lined up at outside receiver for Cal and was productive thanks to quickness and change-of-direction skills. He's a willing blocker who can help in the run game—something that may point to special teams ability—and isn't afraid to get physical. Harper can make defenders miss with the ball in his hands, and he's a twitchy player for a short burst. His concentration and awareness on deep passes show NFL skill.

    WEAKNESSES

    Harper didn't get a combine invite after leaving Cal one year early—a major concern. His play strength is below average on a very thin (5'11", 175 lbs) frame. Harper doesn't have the top-end speed to threaten NFL cornerbacks and must improve his strength to get open underneath.

    Harper isn't a clean catcher and likes to let the ball get into his body, but he's not big enough to effectively shield defenders from trying to come through him to the ball. He lacks the physical tools to convince that he's a long-term option in the NFL.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     52 634 6

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

40. Christion Jones, Alabama

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    Brynn Anderson/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.63s 8 Reps 32.5" 119.0" 6.91s

    STRENGTHS

    A versatile athlete with returner upside, Christion Jones is a creator with the ball in his hands. On short and intermediate routes, he sinks his hips well and can separate from defenses. If facing a zone defense, Jones can sit down in space and pick up yards by eluding tacklers with impressive short-area agility. He likes to dance and will shake defenders with his hips. His open-field vision is a plus, and he'll get a shot to win a return job as a rookie.

    WEAKNESSES

    A lack of timed speed will be the first big issue for Jones, who has to be faster than his 4.63-second time. He didn't back that up with any impressive agility or explosive jump numbers either. And with just eight reps on the bench, his play strength is questioned.

    Jones' play speed is better than his timed speed, but can he run with NFL defenders? His small frame (5'10", 182 lbs) and limited exposure as a receiver make him a developmental pick with special teams impact early on.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     19 264 1

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

39. Evan Spencer, Ohio State

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    Butch Dill/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.45s 20 Reps - - -

    STRENGTHS

    The best blocking receiver in the 2015 class, Evan Spencer is tough as nails. He has football in his blood (his dad is a coach for Tampa Bay and his brother a scout for Washington), and you can tell he loves the game. Spencer plays tough and aggressive, and he'll knock defenders on their tails in the run game. He excels on crack-backs and puts defenders on notice. As a receiver, he has quick, consistent hands and the size (6'2", 208 lbs) to play physically through his route.

    Spencer would be a fit for Chip Kelly's offense given his love for blocking and solid hands.

    WEAKNESSES

    Spencer's lack of production (52 career catches, 15 in 2014) will raise eyebrows, even coming from a run-first scheme. He has a limited ceiling as a receiver due to average speed off the line and a lack of shake after the catch. Spencer is best suited to the outside, but he's not scheme-friendly for every team. He is an average athlete with great work ethic but limited experience and polish.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     15 149 3

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Quality Backup)

    Pro-day results via Doug Lesmerises of Northeast Ohio Media Group. 

38. DeAndrew White, Alabama

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    Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.44s - 34.5" 118.0" 6.97s

    STRENGTHS

    DeAndrew White has the speed teams are looking for and the ability to get deep and work defenses over the top. White was a top prep player coming out of high school and has potential. He adjusts to the ball in the air well and played many Blake Sims passes better than he should have given his body control and tracking skills. He can run the fade all day and looks the ball in over either shoulder for basket catches. He's a smooth player with upside to develop if he can stay healthy.

    WEAKNESSES

    Being healthy is a huge key for White as he enters the NFL. He's been consistently banged up at Alabama and missed serious time due to the injuries. White has NFL speed, but he doesn't separate well from better cornerbacks and has to rely on contested catches, which he's inconsistent at due to a lack of size (5'11", 193 lbs).

    White doesn't have the tools to ever be a No. 1 receiver, and his lack of top-end speed may keep him projected as a No. 4 receiver.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     40 504 4

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Quality Backup)



37. Deon Long, Maryland

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.51s 12 Reps 34.0" 120.0" 6.98s

    STRENGTHS

    A fast, long, lean receiver (6'0", 192 lbs) with outside skills, Deon Long has the goods to take over the defense. Long is a solid route-runner with good hands and concentration to attack the ball away from his frame. He looks more athletic on film than he tested at the combine and has the quickness to throw defenders off his hip in coverage. He uses his body well as a route-runner and will set up defensive backs with body lean and fakes. Long also brings value as a punt returner.

    WEAKNESSES

    Long has build-up speed but isn't very sudden or explosive off the line. His slight frame will concern teams, as he doesn't have the play power to beat a jam at the line or the padding to absorb NFL-style hits. Long must prove he can separate from NFL defenders over the top. His motor runs hot and cold too often—not a good sign for a 24-year-old rookie. Long attended four schools (Maryland, Iowa Western, New Mexico, West Virginia), and a broken leg cost him the 2013 season.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     51 575 2

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Quality Backup)

36. Stefon Diggs, Maryland

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    Gene J. Puskar/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.46s - 35.0" 115.0" 7.03s

    STRENGTHS

    Stefon Diggs is a flashy, twitchy athlete with the open-field skills to tear up defenses. He has phenomenal body control and balance, and he's able to accelerate in a hurry and change directions on a dime. Diggs is a subtle route-runner with good instincts and the vertical jump to high-point the ball and contest jump balls. He can make plays from the slot or outside in college but projects best to the inside as a pro. He can eat up yards and create with the ball in his hands and will need his touches schemed for him.

    WEAKNESSES

    Diggs plays smaller than his 6'0", 195-pound size would suggest. His 40 time was not great and points to an issue on film of separating deep. He does have explosive skills as a jumper and short-area runner, but he's not able to take the top off the defense. Diggs was a highly touted prep player and still carries hype from those days. At Maryland, he struggled to stay healthy, with two straight years of season-ending injuries (broken leg in 2013, lacerated kidney in 2014), and was suspended after a fight against Penn State.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     62 792 5

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Quality Backup)



35. Rannell Hall, UCF

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    Christian Petersen/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.60s 16 Reps 41.0" 132.0" 6.86s

    STRENGTHS

    A Senior Bowl invite, Rannell Hall shared targets with Breshad Perriman and J.J. Worton at Central Florida in the first season after Blake Bortles left. He shows impressive body control and tracking ability down the field and will make the spectacular catch. He doesn't shy away from contested coverage.

    Hall showed consistent improvement during his Senior Bowl week and made some of the best catches in Mobile that week. He looks like a deep threat with body control and off-the-ground ability.

    WEAKNESSES

    Poor speed and agility times are an issue for Hall, who also has short arms and small hands. He makes highlight-reel catches look easy but turns around and drops the easy grabs. It's purely a concentration issue and fixable, but it is holding him back now. The lack of deep speed to carry defenders down the field makes Hall a tough projection as a deep threat. At 6'0" and 198 pounds, he should be much quicker and have better deep speed.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     49 500 -

    FINAL GRADE: 5.15/9.00 (Quality Backup)



34. Ty Montgomery, Stanford

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    Darron Cummings/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.55s - 40.5" 121.0" 6.97s

    STRENGTHS

    A return man specialist with yards-after-catch potential, Ty Montgomery will make an immediate impact on special teams. Montgomery is slippery with the ball in his hands and has the power to run through tackles. He has enough speed to be a threat in the open field and has the quickness to be elusive with the ball in his hands.

    Montgomery would be ideal in a scheme that lets him work out of the backfield, from the slot, as a return man and on jet sweeps and packaged plays. He's capable of big plays and could become a better pro than college player if used correctly.

    WEAKNESSES

    It's almost unfair to call Montgomery a receiver, as he isn't a natural catcher and had more drops than any player charted this year. Montgomery is a running back playing receiver at this point, and his hands aren't developed enough to be a threat in the pros. Schemed touches and plays as a return man offer Montgomery the best chance to get his hands on the ball in the NFL. Injuries (shoulder, knee) have been an issue for him in college.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     61 604 3

    FINAL GRADE: 5.15/9.00 (Quality Backup)



33. DaVaris Daniels, Notre Dame

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    JOE RAYMOND/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.62s 13 Reps 37.0" 122.0" -

    STRENGTHS

    To scout DaVaris Daniels, you must go back to 2013 and to a much different quarterback situation at Notre Dame. Daniels was a producer for the Fighting Irish pre-suspension and has the size and awareness to get a look. He has toughness at the receiver position and can line up inside or outside, with the power to beat jams and work through traffic.

    He looks the ball in and is a clean-hands catcher both in space and over the middle. Daniels looked quicker on film than his combine testing showed, but it was a year ago when he last played football.

    WEAKNESSES

    Daniels missed the 2014 season due to an academic scandal and did not transfer or attempt to play elsewhere. His 4.62 time at the combine did not impress and brings up questions as to what he has been doing in his time off.

    Daniels' film speed was adequate, but never great, and he's not the type to produce after the catch. As a route-runner, he's very raw and doesn't show good body control or balance on breaking routes. He needs time to dust off his skills and could be a steal if his off-field issues aren't an issue and he commits to getting back in football shape.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     - - -

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)

32. Justin Hardy, East Carolina

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    Stacy Revere/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.56s 11 Reps 36.5" 114.0" 6.63s

    STRENGTHS

    A smart, productive, natural receiver with good instincts, Justin Hardy has noticeable length and hand size for his 5'10" frame. As a route-runner he's good at what East Carolina asked of him and shows the instincts and awareness to adjust on the fly.

    Hardy is a hands catcher with big mitts and confidence in his ability to secure the ball with extended arms. He's a natural, easy mover as a runner and is quicker than fast. He is consistent and reliable with the potential to develop into a good slot receiver at the next level.

    WEAKNESSES

    A lack of speed on a small frame will raise eyebrows. Hardy doesn't have build-up speed or burst and will struggle to separate from NFL coverage—especially when he's asked to play inside to protect his frame. He ran a very limited offense at East Carolina and was more of a spot receiver than extended route-runner. He is not a threat to create or produce after the catch.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     121 1,494 10

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)



31. Devante Davis, UNLV

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    Rick Scuteri/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.57s 16 Reps 35.5" 115.0" 7.25s

    STRENGTHS

    Devante Davis is big, and he plays big. At 6'3" and 220 pounds, he uses his size well to box out defenders and uses his length to high-point and take the ball away from defenders.

    Davis excels at tracking the ball over his shoulder and is a weapon for quarterbacks to simply throw it up to and let him run under it or out-body the defender for the ball. Davis will pick up some yards post-catch and is a north-south runner who can break tackles and get down the field.

    WEAKNESSES

    Davis doesn't have runaway speed and will struggle to create distance between himself and coverage. It's not just deep speed that he lacks, but the quickness to shake defenders on breaking routes.

    The big issue with Davis outside of his speed is his hands. He will make the ridiculous catch and turn around and drop the easy ball. He's inconsistent as a catcher and isn't a natural when pulling the ball in.

    He missed nearly half of the 2014 season with a hand/wrist injury.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     34 599 4

    FINAL GRADE: 5.25/9.00 (Quality Backup)



30. Mario Alford, West Virginia

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    Nick Wass/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.43s 13 Reps 34.0" 121.0" 6.64s

    STRENGTHS

    Mario Alford blew the doors off the West Virginia pro day with a 4.27-second 40-yard dash—and that alone might get him drafted higher than expected. He's an explosive player with the ball in his hands and a mix of production and upside.

    Alford played running back at Georgia Military College and has value coming out of the backfield, on jet sweeps, as a receiver and as a return man. He can take the top off the defense and has true speed to run away from coverage. His experience at multiple positions and alignments makes him more valuable.

    WEAKNESSES

    Short and small, Alford has to prove he has a fit in the NFL—but players like Dri Archer continue to get drafted high based on speed and athleticism. Teams will immediately question the difference between his combine and pro day 40 times.

    Alford is fast but not agile and doesn't make tacklers miss in the open field. He's more sprinter than shaker. Drops were an issue for Alford, who seemed to look off the ball and look for the big play before securing the pass.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     65 945 11

    FINAL GRADE: 5.25/9.00 (Quality Backup)



29. Geremy Davis, UConn

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    Jessica Hill/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.48s 23 Reps 36.5" 124.0" 6.86s

    STRENGTHS

    A big receiver with strong, sure hands, Geremy Davis didn't drop a pass in 2014, with 44 catches. With good speed, a huge wingspan (77") and soft hands, Davis will get a look from NFL scouts. He has a big, strong frame and comes off the line with power.

    Teams trying to jam Davis will struggle, because he has length and uses his quickness well to shake defenders off the snap. He's a physical receiver with some post-up and red-zone skills.

    WEAKNESSES

    If you're looking for production, Davis is not your guy. He's scored just six touchdowns in two seasons despite having red-zone size. He is not a savvy route-runner at this point and struggles with body control and lean.

    A lack of speed on film is the big issue here. He's not twitchy and doesn't pop with the burst or long acceleration you want in a wide receiver. Davis will struggle to get open in the NFL if he can't improve his ability as a route-runner. Don't let his workout numbers fool you—Davis did not look that fast or agile on film.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     44 521 3

    FINAL GRADE: 5.25/9.00 (Quality Backup)

28. Titus Davis, Central Michigan

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    Al Goldis/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.51s - 32.5" 119.0" 7.14s

    STRENGTHS

    Put Titus Davis in your sleeper category. He's a smart, instinctive receiver who understands the field well and works back to the quarterback and knows when and where to break off his routes. He had impressive, consistent production at Central Michigan without great quarterback play.

    Davis might not be a burner, but he has good speed momentum and can build up to run past defenders. Where he really wins is as a route-runner, and he has the quickness and body control to beat college cornerbacks. His hands are also NFL-quality, and he'll be an asset as a possession receiver.

    WEAKNESSES

    For his frame, Davis doesn't have the top-end speed teams want. His film doesn't show great elusiveness after the catch either. He's not a player with much burst and will have to work to beat NFL coverage.

    Davis hasn't been tested by top-tier talent at cornerback in the MAC and will be in for an adjustment in the pros. If he can get open in the NFL, he has the hands to make plays.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     60 980 13

    FINAL GRADE: 5.25/9.00 (Quality Backup)

27. Vernon Johnson, Texas A&M-Commerce

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    Image courtesy of NFLPA
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.53s 18 37" 127"  7.39s

    STRENGTHS

    A burner with true speed to run past defenders, Vernon Johnson has the wheels to kill defenses. He’s a deep threat right now for the NFL and has the quickness to make plays after the catch underneath. He can create with the ball in his hands and has impressive agility to shake defenders.

    Johnson can take a pass in the flats and turn it into major yards. He goes from zero to top speed in a hurry. He has good, sure hands and is a comfortable, confident catcher. He brings immediate potential as a return man.

    WEAKNESSES

    Johnson has never seen anything close to NFL competition. He’s a skinny, light, slight body who could struggle against NFL tacklers underneath and on contested passes. He’s not a developed route-runner and will be able to contribute only on go routes and smoke routes early on. His frame and speed point him to the slot, but Johnson has to learn to beat a jam at the line of scrimmage.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     69 1,345 13

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Quality Backup)

26. Gavin Lutman, Pittsburgh State

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    Image courtesy of Joplin Globe
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     - - - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A star in the MIAA, Gavin Lutman was John Brown’s running mate until the former went to the Arizona Cardinals in the third round of the 2014 draft.

    Lutman has size (6’3”, 214 lbs), deep speed and brings the jumping ability to dominate on contested catches. He beat up on small competition with his length and speed down the field. He’s primarily a deep and slant receiver, but he runs his limited routes well and has the power to beat press coverage and get leverage off the snap. Lutman could be an early weapon on jump balls and in the red zone while he learns.

    He also helped on special teams and is an ace punt blocker.

    WEAKNESSES

    Lutman hasn’t seen NFL cornerback play and wasn’t invited to the Shrine Game, Senior Bowl or combine. He’s been asked to run two routes (slants and gos) and has little experience with breaking routes. Lutman was able to overpower small cornerbacks at the line and has no experience facing a bigger, stronger press cover cornerback with technique. He’s a boom-or-bust player who has to acclimate to the NFL.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     70 1,196 13

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Quality Backup)

25. Vince Mayle, Washington State

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    Christian Petersen/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.67s - 35.5" 117.0" 6.93s

    STRENGTHS

    A big target on the outside and in the red zone, Vince Mayle does the little things well at the receiver position. He’s a physical receiver who uses his size well and isn’t afraid to box out and put a body on defenders.

    Mayle can dominate smaller cornerbacks off the line. You can see his basketball background in how he plays above the turf. A former JUCO player, Mayle was at Sierra Community College before Washington State and played basketball at Shasta Community College before that.

    Mayle’s best fit is as a possession receiver on the outside and a weapon up the seam.

    WEAKNESSES

    Mayle is not a natural pass-catcher, and his limited speed makes him a gamble despite experience and production. He’s an older player who entered college in 2009.

    Mayle worked out at the combine with a broken thumb, showing his toughness. His combine time of 4.67 in the 40-yard dash will take him off boards for some teams. Poor speed and inconsistent hands push Mayle down the board despite good skills otherwise.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     106 1,483 9

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Quality Backup)

24. Dres Anderson, Utah

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    Rick Bowmer/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     - 13 Reps - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A potential top-100 prospect before injury in late October, Dres Anderson has the potential to be a starting receiver in the NFL. He has the deep speed to carry defenders down the field and open up the offense. He can accelerate past defenders to truly take the top off the defense.

    Anderson tracks the ball well over either shoulder and is a natural at finding the ball. Go to the tape against UCLA and see Anderson’s ability to make circus catches. His dad (Flipper) played at UCLA and in the NFL.

    WEAKNESSES

    A knee injury limited Anderson’s ability to work out before the draft. He tore his meniscus in October. Anderson accepted a Senior Bowl invite but had to pull out due to the injury.

    As a pass-catcher, he can be inconsistent on the routine play. Anderson wasn’t super explosive pre-injury and really shines only when the ball is in the air. He has to learn to run at full throttle no matter the situation. Drops dominate his tape over the last two years. His skinny frame may scare teams off, and he has to prove he can win when contested at the line of scrimmage.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     22 355 4

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Quality Backup)

23. Tony Lippett, Michigan State

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    AJ MAST/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.61s 10 Reps 36" 114.0" 6.92s

    STRENGTHS

    A versatile athlete who may end up ranked at cornerback, Tony Lippett has the height (6'2") and arm length (32 ¾") teams look for on offense and defense. Lippett is a competitor who played on special teams, defense and, of course, offense for the Spartans and was voted team MVP in 2014.

    He’s a consistent producer who went up against top-tier competition in the conference and in practices. Lippett uses his length and hands well to play the ball as a receiver and has the feet to win as a route-runner.

    WEAKNESSES

    A lack of bulk makes Lippett a weak player as a wide receiver, and he doesn’t have the long speed to be a threat as a deep route-runner. He doesn’t do anything great as an offensive prospect, and his high-cut frame makes quick, sharp cuts tough for him.

    Lippett dropped too many passes in traffic to give you confidence in his ability as a secondary receiver in the NFL. With poor film and workout speed, a move to defense may be best for him long term.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     65 1,198 11

    PRO COMPARISON: Brandon LaFell, New England Patriots

    Looking at him as a receiver, Lippett is a long, tall player with possession receiver skills. His upside and style remind of Brandon LaFell.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.35/9.00 (Quality Backup)

22. Darren Waller, Georgia Tech

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    Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.46s 12 Reps 37.0" 125.0" 7.07s

    STRENGTHS

    A monster at wide receiver, Darren Waller will get attention as a receiver and maybe even as a tight end. At 6’6” and 238 pounds, he could be a matchup nightmare for defenses in the slot and has unreal speed for a man his size on the outside.

    Waller shows good hands and uses his length well to pluck the ball out of the air. He’s a natural hands catcher and will go up to pull the ball down in traffic. He can be used on 50/50 throws and shows the toughness to fight for position.

    This is where Waller is at his best—using his size and body control to physically dominate defenders. He’s a tough player to bring down when he’s running after the catch. Immediately, Waller could be an unguardable player in the end zone with Kelvin Benjamin-like upside.

    WEAKNESSES

    Coming out of a triple-option offense, Waller is not a pro-ready receiver. As a route-runner, he’s incredibly raw and basically was used as a post-up player when he was targeted.

    Waller was suspended for the season opener in both 2013 and 2014 and has to answer questions about his work ethic. He’s been a limited playing time option and hasn’t developed real skills as a receiver. He may be overdrafted due to his size and speed. Waller has a very low floor, and if he doesn’t improve, he won’t stick in the NFL.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     26 442 6

    PRO COMPARISON: Chris Matthews, Seattle Seahawks

    A huge receiver with the speed to carry defenders down the field? That sounds like what Chris Matthews did to the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.35/9.00 (Quality Backup)

21. Kenny Bell, Nebraska

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    Nati Harnik/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.42s 7 Reps 41.5" 129.0" 6.66s

    STRENGTHS

    A tough-as-nails receiver who helps in the run game and over the middle, Kenny Bell is a coach’s dream. Bell sneaks up on you as a speedy player who can get behind defenders and produce down the field. He’s a four-year starter who can help on the outside and in the slot and is a scary threat as a return man.

    Bell has strong hands in the clutch and will pull in tough grabs on the sideline and down the field. He rises to the occasion on the field and makes big plays for the Nebraska offense.

    WEAKNESSES

    Bell wasn’t a consistent producer and comes out of an offense that never featured his skills. He has straight-line speed, but he isn’t fluid or flexible and shows stiffness in his breaks and when asked to adjust to the ball.

    His on-field strength is an issue, and if he’s pressed at the line of scrimmage, he has no answer to a strong jam if his quickness doesn’t get him free. With better timing on his routes and better hip flexibility, Bell could become a bigger threat as a route-runner.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     47 788 6

    FINAL GRADE: 5.35/9.00 (Quality Backup)

20. Chris Conley, Georgia

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    Andy Lyons/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.35s 18 Reps 45.0" 139.0" 7.06s

    STRENGTHS

    Chris Conley blew up at the combine and made everyone take notice. Conley posted eye-popping numbers in the 40-yard dash, bench press, vertical and broad jumps. That shows up on film too, where he’s a silky smooth route-runner who can accelerate in a hurry to blow past cornerbacks.

    He destroys a cushion off the line, and cornerbacks will demand help over the top when facing him in man coverage. Conley has long arms (33 ¾”) and uses his hands to get the ball out of the air. You won’t see him let the ball get into his frame or bounce off his pads. Conley is a high-character player with no concerns. Teammates called him a “nerd” when we asked about Conley.

    WEAKNESSES

    Conley is a one-year wonder who dominated in 2014 but was injured and limited in 2013. At 6’2”, he has size, but he doesn’t play up to his 213-pound frame. He’s easily bumped and jammed at the line of scrimmage and struggles to get off the ball on time.

    Conley is limited as a runner after the catch and doesn’t yet translate his speed to the field there. He’s not particularly agile to make elusive moves with the ball. Conley’s film and workouts show too many drops.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     36 657 8

    PRO COMPARISON: Travis Benjamin, Cleveland Browns

    Is he a sprinter or a football player? The jury is still out on Conley, but his traits remind of Travis Benjamin, but with a higher ceiling.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Quality Backup)

19. Antwan Goodley, Baylor

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    Eric Gay/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.44s - 35" 129" 7.19s

    STRENGTHS

    A sprinter with a running back’s body, Antwan Goodley is a freak at receiver. Goodley can attack the field at different levels and be a threat with the ball in his hands post-catch. He’s produced at Baylor vertically and has the juice to get over the top on defenders.

    WEAKNESSES

    Goodley isn’t a natural when it comes to catching the ball. He becomes a body catcher and lets the pass get inside his shoulders far too often. He doesn’t look natural at receiver and quickly reminds of former LSU and NFL receiver Josh Reed—a slot receiver built like a running back who couldn’t get open in the NFL. He’ll have to work hard at improving his consistency as a catcher.

    Goodley has produced, but is he the product of the Baylor system, and how much of his production should be credited to quarterback Bryce Petty?

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     60 830 6

    PRO COMPARISON: Ted Ginn, Carolina Panthers

    A return man with freakish speed and questionable receiver skills, Goodley is this generation’s Ted Ginn as a prospect.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.45/9.00 (Quality Backup)

18. Josh Harper, Fresno State

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    John Locher/Associated Press
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     4.64s 13 Reps 32.0" 108.0" 7.15s

    STRENGTHS

    A big producer with good quickness and great hands over the middle, Josh Harper has the goods to make an impact on day one. Harper plays with confidence on the edge and when asked to make plays in traffic. He uses his frame well to shield the ball from defenders and works back to the football.

    He’s not a burner down the field but gets into his top gear fast and can slip away from coverage with quick feet and sharp cuts. Harper is a smart football player with good instincts. He won’t struggle to adapt to an NFL playbook. Harper may not be super fast, but he has some scoot and wiggle when the ball is in his hands.

    WEAKNESSES

    Harper is a marginal athlete with poor speed and poor field strength. He has struggled with injuries throughout his career and may not be a durable pro. Harper is scheme-specific and will be a favorite of teams running a West Coast offense or in need of a possession receiver. He didn't face much press coverage at Fresno State and will have to learn to work off physical cornerbacks in the pros.

    Harper is a lazy route-runner who doesn’t finish routes or consistently explode through breaks.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     90 1,097 7

    PRO COMPARISON: Michael Crabtree, Oakland Raiders

    Smart, smooth and productive, Josh Harper compares athletically and in style to Michael Crabtree—and both have struggled with injuries in the past.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.45/9.00 (Quality Backup)

17. DeAndre Smelter, Georgia Tech

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    Scott Cunningham/Getty Images
    40         Bench PressVertical   Broad      3-Cone      
     - - - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A blur after the catch, DeAndre Smelter can pick up yards and shake defenders with the ball in his hands. He's also strong enough to run over defenders. He has huge hands (11") on a 6'2", 226-pound frame and isn't afraid to go over the middle or work down the sideline. He understands comeback routes and shows both ideal footwork to break off the route and good body positioning to shield the ball from the defender.

    Smelter has some Brandon Marshall to his game in how he works defensive backs with power and length. He's smart, polished and will be NFL-ready once healthy.

    WEAKNESSES

    Smelter tore his ACL late in the year and may have to redshirt in his rookie year. On the field, he flashes inconsistent hands and lets the ball get into his body too fast. He's very raw as a receiver and has just two years' experience after playing baseball. Georgia Tech's offense doesn't ask receivers to see a full route tree, so he's limited really to comebacks and backyard football-style routes.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     35 715 7

    FINAL GRADE: 5.49/9.00 (Future Starter)



16. Jamison Crowder, Duke

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     4.56s 10 Reps 37.0" 115.0" 7.17s

    STRENGTHS

    Jamison Crowder is a polished route-runner with quick hands and feet. He was impressive early in the week at the Senior Bowl with a big catch radius and sneaky speed after the catch. Crowder not only produces as a receiver, but as a punt returner. He is more quick than fast and has impressive acceleration off the line of scrimmage.

    Crowder isn’t afraid of contact or traffic and will make plays over the middle without restraint. He can line up inside or outside at receiver and is well-coached coming out of Duke.

    WEAKNESSES

    Crowder is a small body without the speed to separate from defenders over the top. He isn’t able to maintain his acceleration and doesn’t have the second gear to run past defenders down the field. He’s more short than small but has poor length and small hands. Crowder will be typecast to the slot and has a limited ceiling due to height and speed limitations.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     85 1,044 6

    PRO COMPARISON: Danny Amendola, New England Patriots

    Teams that value return men and slot receivers will love Jamison Crowder—and from an athletic and style standpoint, he’s Danny Amendola minus the injuries.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.49/9.00 (Future Starter)

15. Dezmin Lewis, Central Arkansas

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     4.58s 16 Reps 33.5" 119.0" 7.11s

    STRENGTHS

    A stud in the Southland conference, Dezmin Lewis has intriguing upside and passes the eye test at receiver. Lewis has long arms (32 ½") and a big frame (6’4”, 214 lbs) and uses his length well to go up and attack the ball.

    He impressed at the Senior Bowl and showed improvement throughout the week working with Jacksonville Jaguars coaches. Lewis can track the ball over his shoulders and has the reach to go grab the ball. He moves well and is a fluid runner with a good stride and enough speed to loosen up the defense.

    WEAKNESSES

    Lewis has not been challenged by NFL-caliber defenders and is a gamble on upside and the ability to coach him up. As a route-runner, Lewis needs a lot of work. He’s a player who relies purely on speed and length, but he doesn’t overpower smaller cornerbacks and has to learn to play to his strength. He didn’t see much of a route tree at Central Arkansas and has to put in the work to improve as an NFL-level route-runner.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     64 945 9

    PRO COMPARISON: Martavis Bryant, Pittsburgh Steelers

    A mid-round prospect with good size, speed and deep-ball ability, Lewis could be this year’s Martavis Bryant.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Future Starter)

14. Sammie Coates, Auburn

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     4.43s 23 Reps 41.0" 131.0" 6.98s

    STRENGTHS

    A naturally gifted athlete with size, speed and upside, Sammie Coates has the explosive ability to take the top off defenses. Coates is built like a young Terrell Owens and has the speed to match. He lives up to his 4.43 speed and can tear defenses apart with his short-area quickness and burst after the catch.

    Coates has big-play strength and can get off jams with his length and upper-body power. He demands safety help and will see bracket coverage in the NFL if he can connect on a few deep passes. He’s able to separate with speed and length. He’s an upside bet who could pay off in a big way.

    WEAKNESSES

    Drops and a limited route tree are major issues on Coates’ tape. He has elite potential, but until he can clean up concentration drops and learn a full route tree, he’s a gamble.

    Coates comes out of a run-first offense and is not NFL ready. He has the arm length (33 ⅜") to have a huge catch radius, but it’s not there on film. He’s not natural when attacking the ball. Many of his drops look like he’s misplaying the ball in the air, and Coates has to learn to see the ball and adjust his speed likewise. Too often, he doesn’t accelerate to the top end and fails to play to his true speed.

    He’s a boom-or-bust player with athleticism but a lack of football traits.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     34 741 4

    PRO COMPARISON: Kenny Britt, St. Louis Rams

    A bit of a gamble as a natural receiver, Coates’ physical traits and upside are comparable to Kenny Britt's.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Future Starter)

13. Tyler Lockett, Kansas State

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     4.40s - 35.5" 121.0" 6.89s

    STRENGTHS

    A deep threat with big speed and acceleration, Tyler Lockett has the skills to be a better pro than college player. A legacy player whose dad (Kevin) played in the NFL, he’s a twitchy player at the line of scrimmage and is able to beat a jam with a sidestep or head fake.

    Lockett is a talented route-runner with a full route tree. He can win at the top of his route stem with speed and agility. Lockett gets involved in the run game and had to be a solid blocker to start at Kansas State. He can come in and immediately make a play as a return man. He’s field smart and explosive, which gives you the confidence that he’ll make a smooth, fast transition.

     

    WEAKNESSES

    Lockett’s lack of size will be an issue and typecast him as a slot receiver. He can beat the initial jam, but he will get bumped and thrown off his timing in his route. He has small hands (8 ⅜") and shorter arms (30"), making him susceptible to a long cornerback jamming him.

    Lockett was productive against very good Big 12 defenders, at times making huge plays, but he also struggled in routine games—consistency is an issue.

     

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     106 1,515 11

    PRO COMPARISON: John Brown, Arizona Cardinals

    A small receiver with speed and the ability to win over the top or in the return game, Lockett could be this year’s John Brown.

     

    FINAL GRADE: 5.55/9.00 (Future Starter)

12. Tre McBride, William & Mary

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     4.41s 16 Reps 38.0" 122.0" 6.96s

    STRENGTHS

    A small-school stud who looks the part on the hoof, Tre McBride can make an early impact in the NFL. He’s a productive kick returner and has the speed to pull away from defenders. He’s top-end fast and agile enough to make tacklers miss with the ball in his hands.

    McBride is a smooth runner who can separate from coverage (man or zone) with his speed and body control. He tracks the ball very well deep and has the length to pull the ball in over his shoulder for top-tier ball skills. His catch radius is jaw-dropping. McBride made it look easy against small competition.

    WEAKNESSES

    The biggest question on McBride will be his ability to produce against NFL talent since he was sheltered at William & Mary. McBride is fast on the track, but his game film didn’t scream sub-4.4 seconds. He dominated with bad quarterback play but played in an offense that was very limited and didn’t ask a big route tree from him. McBride hasn’t had to learn to beat press coverage from skilled cover people.

    He’s football raw but a great athlete.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     64 809 4

    PRO COMPARISON: Robert Woods, Buffalo Bills

    McBride isn’t as refined as Woods, but they’re very similar players on the field, and their upside is also comparable.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.55/9.00 (Future Starter)

11. Rashad Greene, Florida State

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     4.53s - 36.5" 122.0" 6.88s

    STRENGTHS

    A star at Florida State and a super-productive player over the last two years, Rashad Greene is one of the best route-runners in the 2015 draft class. Greene is a gamer who came up huge in tight games and was Jameis Winston’s go-to target in 2014. He is a smooth, clean, fluid route-runner who doesn’t waste steps or time and can be a factor in a West Coast offense due to his experience with timing-based routes.

    Greene is field smart and adjusts to the ball and can break off his route when needed. He can pick up yards after the catch and runs like he’s being chased. He’s able to separate with routes and speed off the top of his route stem.

    WEAKNESSES

    A small, slight frame will limit Greene to slot receiver status in the NFL. He lacks top-end speed and doesn’t have the tested or on-film agility to make plays and separate from defenders. His small frame makes him a potential risk over the middle, where he’ll have to fight with linebackers and safeties.

    Drops were an issue for Greene as he transitioned from EJ Manuel to Jameis Winston at quarterback. He is a small player who plays smaller.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     99 1,365 7

    PRO COMPARISON: Emmanuel Sanders, Denver Broncos

    Greene doesn’t look the part or have great speed, but he’s smooth and productive and is a player you don’t want to bet against—kind of like Emmanuel Sanders.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.60/9.00 (Future Starter)

10. Breshad Perriman, UCF

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     4.24s 18 Reps 36.5" 127.0" -

    STRENGTHS

    The son of former NFL wide receiver Brett Perriman, Breshad has his own set of skills and is an exciting threat coming out of UCF. He has elite speed, with a 4.24-second showing in the 40-yard dash at his pro day. He has the size, speed and twitchy athleticism you won’t find in many prospects.

    Perriman is an upside player with boom-or-bust potential. He was a three-year producer and is a true threat down the field. He eats up cushions at the line and has the size and length to break free from press coverage.

    Perriman does a good job adjusting his body to the ball and has the body control and athleticism to be a very good player above the field on jump balls. His ability after the catch is great, as he’s slippery, with change-of-direction agility and top-end speed.

    WEAKNESSES

    Drops and raw route-running are all over the tape if you watch Perriman’s games at UCF. He is not a technical route-runner and relies on speed to get open instead of perfecting his cuts and breaks. He doesn’t sink his hips when changing direction and has a tendency to not finish routes.

    Perriman has slow hands and doesn’t attack the ball, instead waiting for it to come to him. That led to drops in the AAC, so imagine what it’ll do in the NFL.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     50 1044 9

    PRO COMPARISON: Stephen Hill, Carolina Panthers

    An amazing athlete, but can he master the position? Perriman will either be Demaryius Thomas or Stephen Hill.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.20/9.00 (Rookie Impact)

9. Devin Smith, Ohio State

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     4.42s 10 Reps 39.0" 122.0" 6.83s

    STRENGTHS

    A deep threat who came on strong at the end of the season, Devin Smith has the speed and strong hands to take the top off the defense. Smith adjusts to the ball in the air and has the vision and body control to put himself in position to haul in overthrows and underthrows down the field.

    He uses his length well to create a big catch radius and has strong, sure hands either over the shoulder or when making a play in traffic. He’s explosive out of the gate and has the speed to run past defenders, which is evident both on film and in workouts.

    WEAKNESSES

    Smith was a bit of a one-trick pony at Ohio State, which opens up questions about if that’s all he can do or all the Buckeyes asked him to do. Smith was a non-factor at times in 2014 until the Ohio State offense opened up to the deep ball with Cardale Jones at quarterback.

    At the Senior Bowl, he struggled to make an impact in practices due to weak-armed quarterbacks. Smith’s underneath and intermediate route-running need work.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     33 931 12

    PRO COMPARISON: Mike Wallace, Minnesota Vikings

    A top-notch deep threat, Smith has to prove he can develop into more than that. That’s why he gets the Mike Wallace comparison.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Rookie Impact)

8. Devin Funchess, Michigan

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     4.70s 17 Reps 38.5" 122.0" 6.98s

    STRENGTHS

    A former tight end at Michigan, Devin Funchess made the move to wide receiver on the depth chart in 2014. He’s a big player who makes himself a threat with body positioning, catch radius and strength. He’s a strong player coming off the line of scrimmage and uses his length well to keep defenders from jamming him.

    Funchess is NFL-ready and shows good awareness and recognition of what the defense is doing. He’s comfortable lining up in multiple positions and can be swapped around to find a mismatch. His feet are quick and light for his frame, and he’ll surprise defenders with his short-area burst if he gets a safety or linebacker matchup. He can overpower cornerbacks at the line and at the catch point and uses his upper body well to box out for tough catches.

    WEAKNESSES

    Drops were a main issue for Funchess over the last two seasons. Many concentration-related drops are on his film. Without a great ability to separate from defenders with speed, Funchess has to better protect the football. He doesn’t have deep speed and doesn’t run like a No. 1 receiver. He’ll struggle to separate over the top and may be forced into being more of an intermediate and mid-field target.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     62 733 4

    PRO COMPARISON: Anquan Boldin, San Francisco 49ers

    A physical receiver who lacks ideal speed, Funchess is a younger Anquan Boldin—and he could have that career if he cleans up his drop issues.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Rookie Impact)

7. Phillip Dorsett, Miami (Fla.)

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     4.33s 13 Reps 37.0" 122.0" 6.70s

    STRENGTHS

    A speed demon with big vertical skills, Phillip Dorsett will threaten defenses over the top. Dorsett’s timed speed translates to his tape. Big plays are his signature, whether they occur on deep passes or short catches followed by long runs.

    We’re talking elite explosiveness and speed down the field, with exceptional burst to get to top speed in a hurry. He’ll eat up a cushion in man coverage and can run past cornerbacks and demand safety help over the top.

    Dorsett can line up in the slot or outside the numbers. He has shown top-tier deep-ball skills and adjusts his body and eyes well over the shoulder. He has quick, soft hands and pulls the ball in away from his frame.

    WEAKNESSES

    Dorsett was never a dominant player at Miami and had only 36 catches as a senior. He missed five games in 2013 with an injured (partially torn) MCL. Dorsett relies on pure speed instead of technique as a route-runner and must work on breaking routes and footwork when asked to plant-and-go.

    He doesn’t have the play power to beat press coverage consistently and has rarely faced a jam due to his speed.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     36 871 10

    PRO COMPARISON: T.Y. Hilton, Indianapolis Colts

    T.Y. Hilton should be Dorsett’s idol, and the two players have similar speed and ability down the field.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.30/9.00 (Rookie Impact)

6. Nelson Agholor, USC

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     4.42s 12 Reps - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A polished, productive receiver running out of a pro-style offense, Nelson Agholor has the look of a very talented No. 2 receiver in the NFL. He has return man skills and can be a special teams threat. He’s a smooth, clean route-runner with good timing, agile breaks and enough burst in short areas to separate from defenders underneath.

    Agholor is coached up and smart on the field. He breaks back to the ball and adjusts to the quarterback on the go. He can play in multiple formations and line up in the slot or on the outside. He has quick hands and is an easy catcher who doesn’t double-clutch or let the ball get into his body.

    WEAKNESSES

    Agholor’s lack of size and top-end speed make him more of a secondary receiver, and his ceiling may be as a good slot receiver instead of as a good outside No. 2. Agholor isn’t sprinter-fast and relies on quickness and timing to get open—which will be an issue in the NFL, where every cover man has speed and/or technique.

    He doesn’t have the top-end speed to attack defenses down the field and will be limited to underneath and intermediate routes—where his smaller frame will be susceptible to big hits. There is legitimate concern that his skills are maxed out.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions     Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     104 1,313 12

    PRO COMPARISON: Greg Jennings, Free Agent

    A smaller receiver with good hands and top-level instincts, Agholor could have a Greg Jennings-like impact and career in the NFL.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.45/9.00 (Rookie Impact)

5. Jaelen Strong, Arizona State

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     4.44s - 42.0" 123.0" 7.33s

    STRENGTHS

    Jaelen Strong plays big, he plays mean and he takes over the game when the ball is in his hands.

    Throw the ball up and Strong will go get it. He doesn’t shy away from contested catches and has the strength to pull the ball down in traffic. He routinely saw bracket coverage in college and was able to split defenders and use his wingspan and jumping ability to generate a huge catch radius. He tracks the ball well over either shoulder and adjusts his hands to passes thrown off target.

    Strong has quick, sure hands. He’s a pill to jam at the line due to his arm length (32 ½") and his strength coming off the line, and he understands leverage and can get a clean release in press coverage.

    WEAKNESSES

    Strong spent just two seasons at Arizona State after transferring from Pierce College, where he sat out his freshman year due to academic reasons. Strong is a raw route-runner, and what he is right now as a technician may worry some. You’re drafting Strong to be a deep threat right now while working on him as a route-runner.

    His deep speed to separate isn’t ideal, and he didn’t wow with quick-twitch or agility numbers. Strong may never be more than a possession receiver and is a gamble as a No. 1 receiver.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     82 1,165 10

    PRO COMPARISON: Alshon Jeffery, Chicago Bears

    A master of the contested catch, Strong is an Alshon Jeffery clone: a big receiver without great speed but with the hands to be a star.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.49/9.00 (Rookie Starter)

4. Dorial Green-Beckham, Missouri

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     4.49s 13 Reps 33.5" 119.0" 6.89s

    STRENGTHS

    An athletically gifted receiver with a huge frame, Dorial Green-Beckham has the natural ability to be a top-10 draft pick. He’s freakishly big and fast, and he could actually stand to drop weight and become twitchier and faster down the field.

    He has rare ability to pluck the ball out of the air away from his body and shows great concentration when the ball is in the air. He attacks the football and is able to win jump balls easily. His body control and athleticism shine when he’s tracking the ball or making a play in the end zone.

    Green-Beckham naturally adjusts well to the ball and can make the ridiculous catch look easy. He’s sure-handed with confidence in his skill set. He has some scoot to his game and will pick up plus yards after the catch on underneath routes (slants, screens) and has good open-field vision.

    WEAKNESSES

    The off-field issues may outweigh the impressive potential for Green-Beckham, which means he may be drafted much later than his ranking. He has two drug-related arrests from his time at Mizzou and was ultimately dismissed from the team after being accused of burglary and domestic assault after allegedly breaking into an apartment and pushing a woman down a staircase, as Tod Palmer of The Kansas City Star reported. Green-Beckham enrolled at Oklahoma but never played in a game after the NCAA upheld his suspension.

    On the field, he’s incredibly raw and ran three routes at Missouri—a fade, a slant and a smoke route, and the slant route wasn’t that pretty. The team drafting him is banking heavily on workouts and scout team looks as a route-runner. He doesn’t play as strong as his size and doesn’t fight for position consistently.

    A pattern of off-field issues, a raw profile as a football player and a year away from the game could all line up to push DGB down the board come draft day.

    2014 STATISTICS 

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     - - -

    PRO COMPARISON: Mike Evans, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

    DGB has the size and hands to be a star, but will teams look past his off-field issues? If he’s dialed in, he's very similar to Mike Evans when he was entering the draft last year.

    FINAL GRADE: 7.15/9.00 (Rookie Starter)

3. DeVante Parker, Louisville

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     4.45s 17 Reps 36.5" 125.0" -

    STRENGTHS

    Big, strong, polished and a nightmare in the red zone, DeVante Parker is worthy of a top-10 pick in this draft class. Parker would have competed to be a first-round pick in the 2014 draft class, but he decided to return to Louisville to get his degree.

    He plays much bigger than his listed size, with excellent leaping skills, extension and body positioning to be a threat in the air. His concentration and hand strength are top-tier, and he’ll rarely lose a 50/50 ball to the defense or a drop.

    Parker is a smart, instinctive, quarterback friendly receiver who works back to the ball and makes himself a big target when the pocket gets flushed.

    WEAKNESSES

    A foot injury caused Parker to miss seven games to begin his senior season. He makes a lot of catches in traffic, which leads to concerns about an ability to separate from coverage. Without great speed, he’ll have to improve his play strength to continue to box out defenders in the NFL.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     43 855 5

    PRO COMPARISON: Keenan Allen, San Diego Chargers

    NFL-sized with great concentration and a natural ability to beat defenders at the jump, Parker reminds of Keenan Allen in style, size and upside.

    FINAL GRADE: 7.30/9.00 (Top 15 Player Potential)

2. Amari Cooper, Alabama

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     4.42s - 33.0" 120.0" 6.71s

    STRENGTHS

    An explosive, polished receiver with instant-impact skills, Amari Cooper was college football’s best receiver in 2014. Cooper is a fluid, fast and smart player capable of lining up at any of the three wide receiver spots and giving you production. He’s the best route-runner in this draft class and has the confidence in his feet and hips to break off routes and accelerate away from defenders.

    Cooper can play underneath, intermediate or deep and gives you versatility in his skill set—meaning he’s scheme-versatile. He’s a complete receiver with production and athleticism. At just 20 years old, Cooper has room to grow and comes into the NFL with a long career projection.

    WEAKNESSES

    Cooper was banged up in 2013 and lacked the explosiveness we saw in his junior season. Even so, his tape speed isn’t as good as his combine speed, and he has to prove he can run past defenders with pads on. He doesn’t have great size or speed when compared to other top receiver draft picks. Drops have been an issue for Cooper, but that’s more concentration related than a physical limitation.

    2014 STATISTICS 

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     124 1,727 16

    PRO COMPARISON: Reggie Wayne, Free Agent

    Cooper has the skills to make an immediate impact in the NFL, and his upside makes him one of the safest picks in the draft. From a pure style standpoint, he’s Reggie Wayne all over again.

    FINAL GRADE: 7.49/9.00 (Pro Bowl Potential)

1. Kevin White, West Virginia

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     4.35s 23 Reps 36.5" 123.0" 6.92s

    STRENGTHS

    Big, physical, fast and with lots of upside as a two-year player at West Virginia, Kevin White has the highest potential of any receiver in this class. A two-year starter at WVU after transferring from Lackawanna College, White had eye-opening production but matched the numbers with traits on film and blew folks away with a 4.35-second 40-yard dash.

    White is the total package: upside and production on an NFL-ready frame. White’s hands were dramatically improved in 2014 once healed from a shoulder injury that slowed him in ‘13. He attacks the ball in the air and has big, strong hands. Cornerbacks can’t beat him at the line with a jam because of his quick-twitch speed and strength. He’s big enough and long enough to compete on 50/50 passes and has the confidence to believe the ball is his.

    WEAKNESSES

    The biggest gripe you’ll hear with White is that he’s a one-year wonder coming out of an offense that doesn’t produce NFL players. Both are fair judgments. White isn’t a super-polished receiver with a big route tree, although he did run more routes in 2014. He’ll have to learn to play without the help of space and motion that the WVU offense generated for him.

    2014 STATISTICS

    Receptions    Yards ReceivingTouchdowns    
     109 1,447 10

    PRO COMPARISON: Dez Bryant, Dallas Cowboys

    Comparing anyone to Dez Bryant is dangerous, but White has the size, speed and physical ability before and after the catch to get the nod.

    FINAL GRADE: 7.50/9.00 (Pro Bowl Potential)

    Pro-day results via NFL.com unless otherwise noted.