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Cowboys' Micah Parsons Denies Shading Dak Prescott in Tweet About QB Contracts

Erin WalshJanuary 25, 2023

Dallas Cowboys linebacker Micah Parsons (11) adjust to a completed pass during an NFL wild-card football game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Monday, Jan. 16, 2023, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Peter Joneleit)
AP Photo/Peter Joneleit

Dallas Cowboys linebacker Micah Parsons clarified the comments he made about quarterback contracts in a Twitter post on Wednesday, writing that his remarks had nothing to do with Dak Prescott.

Micah Parsons @MicahhParsons11

Listen we not gonna sit here like I'm talking about Dak 😂😂😂 Shid when I get paid ima want a big contract too ! Come on stop reaching ! 😂

On Wednesday morning, Parsons quote-tweeted remarks made by Buffalo Bills general manager Brandon Beane, who essentially said his team didn't have to tank for its core players. He even mentioned Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Ja'Marr Chase in his response.

Parsons responded to Beane's comments by writing that three of the final four quarterbacks in the postseason are still on their rookie contracts and are "surrounded by talent."

NFL Twitter took Parsons' tweet the wrong way and assumed he was questioning Prescott's contract.

Micah Parsons @MicahhParsons11

Besides mahomes, every team in the final 4 Qb is on a rookie deal and surrounded by talent! Mhmm interesting take! <a href="https://t.co/Md1CxGq49e">https://t.co/Md1CxGq49e</a>

The final four quarterbacks in the playoffs are the Bengals' Joe Burrow, Kansas City Chiefs' Patrick Mahomes, San Francisco 49ers' Brock Purdy and Philadelphia Eagles' Jalen Hurts.

Only Mahomes has put pen to paper on an extension, agreeing to a 10-year, $450 million deal in July 2020, though Burrow and Hurts will become eligible to sign extensions in the near future, and Purdy just broke into the NFL this season as a seventh-round pick in the 2022 draft.

Prescott signed a four-year, $160 million deal in March 2021.

The Cowboys signal-caller has found great regular-season success since debuting in 2016, leading Dallas to a 61-36 record in 97 games and three NFC East titles, but he has failed to make a name for himself in the playoffs.

In six postseason games, Prescott is 2-4 and has failed to lead the Cowboys past the divisional round, though that's been a problem dating back to the 1995 campaign.

While Parsons wasn't tossing shade at Prescott—top quarterbacks are going to be paid top dollar—the reality in the NFL is that large quarterback contracts make it somewhat difficult for teams to build championship contenders.

For example, the Chiefs won the 2020 Super Bowl with Mahomes on his rookie contract. They also had a talented roster that included Travis Kelce and Tyreek Hill, among others. While Kelce remains on the roster, Kansas City traded Hill to the Miami Dolphins because it couldn't afford to extend his contract.

That's why it becomes important for teams like the Bengals and Eagles to capitalize on the rookie contracts of Burrow and Hurts to win a Super Bowl now before they are paid significantly more money down the line.

Both the Cowboys and Chiefs have experienced that to some extent, and the Bills will begin to realize that once Josh Allen's monster six-year, $258 million deal kicks next season.