NHL's New Jersey Devils All-Time Logos, Uniforms and Arenas (1974-Present)

Roman Uschak@@RomanUschakCorrespondent INovember 19, 2011

New Jersey Devils captain Scott Stevens holds the Stanley cup aloft in front of his teammates during a victory celebration on Wednesday, June 28, 1995 at the  Meadowlands Arena in East Rutherford, N.J.(AP Photo/Karen Ault)
Karen Ault/Associated Press

The New Jersey Devils moved to the Garden State in 1982, but can trace their origins back to earlier incarnations in both Missouri and Colorado. Here's a look at their various logos, uniforms and home arenas during nearly 40 seasons of NHL play.

Kansas City Scouts

The Devils got their start in 1974 in Kansas City, Missouri as the Scouts. They were named after a prominent statue located in the city, and their colors were blue, red, yellow and white. They joined the NHL the same year as the Washington Capitals. Despite playing in a brand-new facility, Kemper Arena, the Scouts won just 27 games in two seasons and failed to draw enough fans for a third. They were sold to new ownership, and relocated to Colorado for the 1976-77 season.

The Scouts' home jerseys were base white with the team logo on the front. The main stripes on the waist, sleeves and shoulders were a wide red in the middle, and were bordered by thinner blue, yellow and red stripes. Numbers on both the shoulders and back were white, trimmed in red. Player last names were added to the back of the white jersey for the 1975-76 campaign only, according to Sportslogos.net.

The socks were white, with red bands bordered by yellow and blue stripes. Those later switched to red bands trimmed with thin yellow and thick blue bands. Red pants with horizontal yellow stripes bordered by blue stripes were worn both seasons. Helmets, if worn, were white.

Anonymous/Associated Press

The Scouts' road jerseys were base blue with the logo front and center. The striping pattern was similar to that of the white jersey. It consisted of red bands on the shoulders, sleeves and waist, bordered on both sides by thinner yellow bands that contained pencil-thin red stripes. Numbers on both the shoulders and back were white, trimmed in red. Players' last names were not featured on the back. The socks were blue, with blue bands bordered by red and yellow ones. Those later switched to yellow bands bordered solely by red bands.

Red pants with horizontal yellow stripes bordered by blue ones were worn both seasons. Helmets, if worn, were blue.

Colorado Rockies

The Scouts became the Colorado Rockies in 1976-77 when they moved to the McNichols Sports Arena in Denver. The club kept the colors of blue, red, yellow and white it had in Kansas City—which were also the colors of the Colorado state flag—but unfortunately, the team didn't enjoy much more success in the Rocky Mountains than it had in Missouri.

The Rockies made the Stanley Cup Playoffs just once in their six seasons in the Mile High City, losing to Philadelphia in the first round in 1978. Four years later, the franchise was again sold and made its way east to the Meadowlands, where it was rechristened as the New Jersey Devils.

Fred Jewell/Associated Press/Associated Press

The Rockies home jersey remained unchanged through their six seasons in Denver. The team's mountain crest adorned the front, while the player last names were featured on the back in blue, above the numbers. Numbers on both the back and sleeves were blue trimmed in red, while the alternate "C" crest that also adorns the Colorado state flag was featured on the shoulders.

The home jerseys were striped blue-yellow-red-yellow-blue on the sleeves, waist and collar. The home socks were white with yellow-red-yellow horizontal striping. The pants were blue with vertical yellow-red-yellow stripes. White helmets (if worn) completed the ensemble.

The Rockies blue road jersey featured white numbers trimmed with red on both the sleeves and backs. The mountain crest adorned the front, while the alternate "C" logo was set atop both shoulders. The striping pattern was a tad simpler than on the white home jerseys, and consisted of a yellow-red-yellow pattern on the sleeves, waist and collar. Player names, in white letters, were added to the back for the 1997-78 season, and remained until the move east to the Meadowlands.

The socks were blue with yellow-red-yellow horizontal striping. The pants were red with vertical yellow-red-yellow stripes. Horizontal yellow-blue-yellow stripes were also added in 1978. Blue helmets (if worn) completed the ensemble.

New Jersey Devils

With the completion of the Brendan Byrne Arena at the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, the former Kansas City Scouts and Colorado Rockies became the New Jersey Devils in 1982.

Named for a supernatural creature that has allegedly roamed the Pine Barrens region of southern New Jersey since the 18th century, the NHL's Devils got off to a slow start after moving to the Garden State and did not qualify for the playoffs their first five seasons at the Meadowlands.

In 1987-88, the Devils finally earned a post-season berth, and came within one game of reaching the Stanley Cup Finals. After several more playoff appearances, and a change in uniform color from green to black, they finally earned their first Stanley Cup in 1995, followed by two more titles in 2000 and 2003.

MONTREAL, CANADA - CIRCA 1983:  Chico Resch #1 of the New Jersey Devils makes a save against the Montreal Canadiens Circa 1983 at the Montreal Forum in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. (Photo by Denis Brodeur/NHLI via Getty Images)
Denis Brodeur/Getty Images

The Devils moved to the brand-new Prudential Center in downtown Newark in 2007, after 25 years and more than 500 victories at the Meadowlands, including two Cup-clinching contests.

The Devils original home jersey bore the distinctive "NJ" horns-and-tail crest, ringed in green. The shoulders were red, with a green yoke that was separated from the shoulders by a white loop. Numbers on the sleeves and back, and player names on the back, were red trimmed in green. Stripes on the sleeves were red-white-green, while those at the waist were green-white-red-white.

The home socks were white with a red band situated above a green band, separated by a band of white. The pants were green, with two red stripes down the sides. The stripes were trimmed with white, and separated from each other by a green stripe. Helmets were white.

The Devils first road uniforms were sometimes referred to as "Christmas-colored", as they were predominantly red with green and white trim.

Mar 18, 2014; Newark, NJ, USA; Boston Bruins right wing Jarome Iginla (12) chips the puck past New Jersey Devils defenseman Bryce Salvador (24) during the second period at Prudential Center. Mandatory Credit: Ed Mulholland-USA TODAY Sports
USA TODAY Sports

The red road jersey bore the distinctive "NJ" horns-and-tail logo crest, ringed in green. The shoulders were green, trimmed with a white yoke. Numbers on the sleeves and back, and player names on the back, were white trimmed in green. Horizontal stripes on the sleeves were white-green-white, with a white stripe set above those, just below the numbers, and separated by a band of red. Stripes at the waist were white-green-white-red-white.

The road socks were red, with a green horizontal band trimmed on either side by a thin white stripe. A thin white stripe was situated above the others, and separated by a band of red.

The pants for both uniforms were green, with two red stripes down the sides. The stripes were trimmed with white, and separated from each other by green, while helmets were red. This uniform has been resurrected in both 2010 and 2011 for one Devils home game game each March, minus the red-white-green gloves the Devils sported from 1982 to 1992.

BILL KOSTROUN/Associated Press/Associated Press

Unable to obtain a consistent green shade in their jerseys, socks and pants, the Devils switched to black in 1992 following their 10th anniversary season.

The Devils new white jerseys featured the familiar "NJ" horns-and-tail crest, now ringed in black. The shoulders were black, while numbers on the sleeves and back, and player names on the back, were red trimmed with black. Stripes on the sleeves, waist and socks were red-black-red, while the collar was black-red-black.

The Devils new red jerseys featured the familiar "NJ" horns-and-tail crest, now ringed in black. The shoulders were black, while numbers on the sleeves and back, and player names on the back were white trimmed with black. Stripes on the collar, sleeves, waist and socks were white-black-white. Pants and helmets were both solid black for home and away.

A silver NHL shield crest was added to the base of the Devils' jersey collars, both home and away, in 2007-08, although the striping sequences were unchanged.

Apr 13, 2014; Newark, NJ, USA; New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur (30) knocks the puck away after making a save on Boston Bruins center Alexander Khokhlachev (76) during the third period at Prudential Center. The Devils defeated the Bruins 3-2.  Mand
USA TODAY Sports

Arenas

Kansas City

The 19,500-seat Kemper Arena was the brand-new home of the Kansas City Scouts when it opened in 1974. It became home to college basketball, several minor-league hockey teams, and a host of other events and concerts after the NHL moved west to Denver in 1976.

Roman J. Uschak photo

The building has largely been supplanted by the newer Sprint Center in recent years. There are plans calling for the potential demolition of Kemper Arena to make room for a new agricultural events center or some other facility.

Denver

Built in 1975, McNichols Sports Arena served as the home ice of the Rockies for their entire existence.

Seating approximately 16,000 for hockey, the building hosted minor-league teams for many years after the Rockies' departure. The Denver Spurs of the World Hockey Association actually called the facility home for its first year (1975-76), before they folded and the Rockies came to town.

The NHL returned to Denver in 1995 when the Quebec Nordiques moved into McNichols Arena as the Colorado Avalanche, who won the Stanley Cup the following spring. The building itself, also the former home of the NBA's Denver Nuggets, was finally razed in 1999, and was replaced by the Pepsi Center.

East Rutherford

Known as Brendan Byrne Arena from 1982 to 1996, Continental Airlines Arena served as the Devils' home from the time they moved from Colorado until they left for Newark following the 2006-07 season.

The site of the Devils' Stanley Cup-clinching wins in both 1995 and 2003, the building was also the longtime home of the NBA's New Jersey Nets and Seton Hall University men's basketball team, and seated 19,040 for hockey. It is still used for concerts, graduations and other events.

Newark

One of the newest arenas in the NHL, the Prudential Center opened as the new home of the Devils in downtown Newark in 2007. It has also served as the home of the NBA's New Jersey Nets, WNBA's New York Liberty, and Seton Hall University men's basketball.

It seats 17,625 for hockey, and is attached to the Devils' practice facility, the AmeriHealth Pavilion.

Now in their 30th year in New Jersey, with three Stanley Cup championships behind them, the Devils legacy continues ...

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