UCLA Men's Basketball: 50 All-Time Greatest Players

Robert Pace@Robert_PaceContributor IIIOctober 18, 2011

UCLA Men's Basketball: 50 All-Time Greatest Players

0 of 51

    On the precipice of what looks like an exciting 2011-12 season for UCLA Men’s Basketball, let’s take a look back at the greatest players in the history of the program.

    While it’s undeniably difficult to juxtapose and numerically rank such Bruin greats as Lew Alcindor and Ed O’Bannon, here’s a look at the top 50 players in Bruin basketball history based upon their individual merit and accomplishments in an UCLA uniform:

Honorable Mention: Ralph Jackson (1981-84)

1 of 51

    Guard Ralph Jackson was best known for his ability to spray the ball around the court, averaging 4.7 assists during his four-year career at UCLA. A three-year starter, Jackson, averaged 8.4 points per game, peaking his senior year with 12.5 points per game.

    Leading the Bruins in assists in all of his four seasons at UCLA, Jackson is sixth in career assists with 523. He also led the Bruins in steals in his freshman and sophomore seasons.

    Trivia: Jackson played one game in the NBA for the Indiana Pacers, recording two points, one rebound, four assists and two steals. 

50. Matt Barnes (1999-02)

2 of 51

    Forward Matt Barnes maximized his two years as a starter at UCLA, having an immediate impact on both sides of the court, averaging 11.6 points, 7.3 rebounds and 1.6 steals in his first year as a starter in his junior season.

    Barnes scored 792 points in his two years as a starter out of his total 1,066 (8.8 avg.), which positions him at No. 44 on the all-time list. He showed off his passing abilities in his senior season, leading the team in assists with 108 (3.5 avg.).  

    Trivia: Before playing in the NBA, Barnes played semi-professional basketball in the D-League and the ABA. 

49. Darren Daye (1980-83)

3 of 51

    Forward Darren Daye was a two-time starter at UCLA, averaging 10.1 points and 4.0 rebounds per game in his four-year career. Daye showed great improvement in his senior season, averaging 15.7 points and six rebounds per game, helping the Bruins win the Pacific-10 and play in the 1983 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament.

    Daye is currently No. 41 on the all-time scoring list with 1149 points (10.1 avg.) and is eighth in career field goal percentage at 55.5 percent.

    Trivia: Daye’s son, Austin Daye, played for Gonzaga and currently plays professional basketball in Turkey.

48. John Moore (1952-55)

4 of 51

    Forward John Moore was a three-time starter for UCLA, leading the Bruins in his sophomore (12.2 avg.) and senior (14.6 avg.) in scoring, and placing himself on as one of the greatest Bruin scorers of his time (he is currently at No. 37 on the all-time scoring list).

    Moore is No. 23 in career rebounds with 650 (6 avg.), which was also a great deal during his time in Bruin history. With greats like Moore setting the bar higher for future Bruins, the foundation was laid for the dynasty to come.

    Trivia: In 1952, Moore led the Bruins in field goal percentage at a measly 38.6 percent. The lowest-ever recorded team-leading field goal percentage for the Bruins was in 1948 by John Stanich—29.6 percent.

47. John Green (1960-62)

5 of 51

    Shooting guard John Green was a pivotal player in the years preceding John Wooden’s championship dynasty. As a three-year starter at UCLA, Green averaged 14.2 points and 5.6 rebounds per game.

    Green led the Bruins in scoring twice, most notably in his senior season with 19.3 points per game. That season, he helped the Bruins win the conference and finish fourth in the NCAA. Green is currently No. 42 on the all-time scoring list with 1148 points (14.2 avg.)

    He was also known for his free throw shooting, ranking seventh in career free throws made (404) and second in free throws made in an individual season (201).

    Trivia: As of 2011, Green holds the record for most free throws made in an individual game—21 in his senior season

46. John Vallely (1969-70)

6 of 51

    Guard John Vallely was a junior-transfer from junior college who was a two-year starter for the Bruins. He played a supporting role in UCLA’s 1969 and 1970 NCAA Championships, scoring 15 points in the finals both years.

    Valley was named on the NCAA All-Tournament Team in both of those years as well. He put solid offensive numbers as a Bruin, averaging 13.8 points per game.  

    Trivia: Vallely played beach volleyball in college as well. He currently operates a website that is dedicated to motivational speaking. 

45. Dijon Thompson (2002-05)

7 of 51

    Shooting guard and small forward Dijon Thompson averaged 15.6 points per game in his three seasons as a starter at UCLA, placing him at No. 22 on the all-time scoring list with 1458 points (12.5 career avg.)

    Thompson decided to stay a Bruin for his senior season instead of enlisting in the NBA draft, having a phenomenal year averaging 18.4 points and 7.9 rebounds per game.

    He also proved to be a good defender, leading the Bruins in steals in two of his three seasons as a starter. He is also ninth in career three-point field goals made with 133.

    Trivia: After two season in the NBA, Thompson went abroad to play basketball. He has played in Germany, Ukraine, Israel, Russia and will play in France in 2011. 

44. Mike Sanders (1979-82)

8 of 51

    Forward Mike Sanders was a versatile player in his three years as a starter at UCLA. He averaged 11.1 points and 5.3 rebounds per game in his career as a Bruin, leading the team in average scoring in his junior (15.4 PPG) and senior (14.4 PPG) seasons.

    Sanders also led the team in rebounds those two seasons, and showed his defensive ability by leading the Bruins in blocks during his sophomore and junior seasons. He is currently No. 36 on the all-time scoring list with 1210 points (11.1 avg.).

    Trivia: Sanders was selected by the Kansas City Kings (currently “Sacramento Kings”) as the 74th overall pick in the 1982 NBA draft. He became a coach in 1998 and has been an assistant coach with the Milwaukee Bucks and the Charlotte Bobcats. 

43. Cameron Dollar (1994-97)

9 of 51

    Guard Cameron Dollar is best known for filling in for the injured Tyus Edney in the 1995 NCAA Men's Basketball championship game versus Arkansas. Dollar had eight assists and four steals in the game to help the Bruins win their first NCAA championship in 20 years.

    Dollar is also prevalently known for in-bounding the ball to Tyus Edney’s 4.8-second game-winning drive against Missouri. He was mostly known for his gritty defense, currently holding the record for most steals in an individual season (82-1997) and ranks fourth overall in all-time steals with 214.

    He was also known for his command of the court and his ability to facilitate plays, as well as for being a great leader. Dollar is ninth in career assists at 451.

    Trivia: As of 2011, Dollar is the head coach of Seattle University, which he is attempting to revive in Division I basketball. 

42. Jérôme Moïso (1999-00)

10 of 51

    Forward Jérôme Moïso showed great potential before enlisting in the 2000 NBA draft. As a Bruin, Moïso averaged 12 points and 6.8 rebounds per game. He led the team in rebounds (252- 7.6 avg.) and blocks (55- 1.7 avg.) during his sophomore season, earning him No. 8 in individual season blocks.

    Moïso is currently No. 10 in average rebounds for a freshman with 5.8 rebounds per game.

    Trivia: In his 11-year professional basketball career, Moïso has played on 13 different teams, including teams in Italy, Spain and Japan after playing in the NBA for five different teams. 

41. Luc Richard Mbah a Moute (2006-08)

11 of 51

    Forward Luc Richard Mbah a Moute is known best for crashing the boards at UCLA, pulling in 8.2 rebounds per game in his freshman season—the second-highest in history for a freshman.

    Mbah a Moute’s offensive stats don’t soar off the charts (career 8.7 points per game) but he was an aggressive defensive player, leading the team with 44 steals (1.1 avg.)his freshman year. Leading the team in rebounds his first two seasons, Mbah a Moute is currently No. 15 in career rebounds with 775 (7.2 avg.)

    He is also No. 12 in individual season rebounds with 318 during his freshman season.

    Trivia: Mbah a Moute, a prince in his native village of Bia Messe in Cameroon, was nicknamed “The Fresh Prince” after the television show "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air."

40. Rod Foster (1980-83)

12 of 51

    Point guard Rod Foster saw the NCAA Finals in his freshman season as a starter. He was named to the All-Tournament Team that year despite losing to Louisville in the championship.

    Foster put up consistent scoring numbers in his four seasons as a varsity starter for the Bruins, averaging 12.1 points per game and being an extremely accurate free throw shooter at 88 percent, which is the highest in UCLA history. He also holds the individual season record for highest free throw percentage at an amazingly accurate 95 percent (1982).

    He also maintains the ninth-highest scoring average for a freshman with 11.5 points per game. Foster in currently No. 28 on the all-time scoring list with 1355 points (12.5 avg.)

    Trivia: Foster was drafted in the second round of the 1983 NBA draft and played four seasons with the Phoenix Suns. 

39. Walt Torrence (1957-59)

13 of 51

    Guard Walt Torrence was very resourceful as a guard, leading the team in rebounds in each of his three seasons as a starter at UCLA. He averaged 15.3 and 8.5 rebounds per game as a Bruin, earning him No. 39 on the all-time scoring list.

    Torrence turned it on as a senior, averaging 21.5 points and 11.6 rebounds per game, ranking him fifth overall in both those categories for a senior. He was inducted into the UCLA Hall of Fame in 2009, represented by his widow, Ada, and his son, Gregory.

    Trivia: Torrence was selected in the eighth round of the 1959 NBA draft by the New York Knicks.

38. Russell Westbrook (2007-08)

14 of 51

    Guard Russell Westbrook was a feisty player in his sophomore season as a starter for UCLA. He averaged 12.7 points, 4.3 assists and 1.6 steals per game that season, in which the Bruins went to the Final Four.

    Westbrook led the Bruins in steals (63) and assists (167) in the 2008 season, ranking ninth in steals in an individual season. Although UCLA would have liked to see him in a Bruin uniform for two more years, Westbrook’s time in Westwood was maximized, as he holds the record for most minutes played in an individual season with 1318 minutes (34 avg.).

    Trivia: At UCLA, Westbrook shared a dorm with teammate and current Minnesota Timberwolves player Kevin Love.

37. Dan Gadzuric (1999-02)

15 of 51

    Center Dan Gadzuric was a threat for opponents on both sides of the court. In his four seasons as a varsity starter at UCLA, Gadzuric averaged 10.5 points, 7.3 rebounds and 1.5 blocks per game.

    Gadzuric is currently No. 33 on the all-time scoring list with 1287 points and is No. 8 on the career rebounds list with 896. He made a great defense impact as well, currently at No. 2 on the career blocks list with 184.

    Gadzuric led the team in field goal percentage in each one of his season as a Bruin and led the team in rebounds and blocks in his final two seasons.

    Trivia: Gadzuric was born in The Hague, Netherlands. As of 2011, he plays basketball in China. 

36. Jelani McCoy (1996-98)

16 of 51

    Center Jelani McCoy showed his dominance in the paint as soon as he stepped on the court his freshman year. During his first season as a Bruin, McCoy averaged 3.3 blocks per game and currently holds the record for all-time blocks at 188.

    He also holds the individual game blocks record of 11, which he achieved as a freshman. McCoy’s 10.4 points per game as Bruin was accompanied the highest career field goal percentage in UCLA history at 69.4 percent.

    McCoy also maintains the record for highest individual season field goal percentage as an astonishing 75.6 percent, which is 8.9 percent greater than the runner-up—Lew Alcindor. He is one of two Bruins to achieve a single-game triple-double (15 PTS 10 RB 11 BLK).

    Trivia: McCoy played in the D-League for a bit with the Los Angeles D-Fenders, and was briefly on the rosters of the Denver Nuggets and the Los Angeles Clippers.

35. Jordan Farmar (2005-06)

17 of 51

    Point guard Jordan Farmar played a big role in his sophomore season in helping the Bruins work their way into the NCAA Championship game. 

    In his two season as Bruin before declaring for the NBA Draft in 2006, Farmar averaged 13.3 points and 5.2 points per game. He was a crafty point guard with the ability to make split-second decisions look easy. 

    During both of his years at UCLA, Farmar led the Bruins in assists and is No. 10 in assists in an individual season. Putting up an impressive 13.2 points per game in his freshman season put him at No. 4 in average scoring for a freshman. 

    Trivia: Farmar also holds the record for most turnovers in an individual season (since 1979) with 135 in his sophomore season, an average of 3.6 turnovers per game.

    Jordan gives back to the community by hosting an annual basketball camp called Hoop Farm at UCLA.

34. Roy Hamilton (1976-79)

18 of 51

    Shooting guard Roy Hamilton was a three-time starter in the very beginning of the post-Wooden era. As a starter his senior season, Hamilton led the Bruins to the Elite Eight, previously putting up 16.8 points per game that season.

    Turning it on his junior and senior seasons, averaging respectively 17.2 and 16.8 points per game, Hamilton worked his way toward No. 29 on the all-time scoring list with 1355 points (12.5 avg.). He also showed defensive proficiency by leading the team in steals (53) his freshman season.

    Hamilton is ranked seventh in career assists (512) and seventeenth in career 20-point games (23).

    Trivia: According to Sports Business Daily, Hamilton worked as a commentator for a few years after his short NBA stint, later becoming the Vice President of Production and Coordinating at the Fox Sports Network. 

33. Kenny Fields (1981-84)

19 of 51

    Forward Kenny Fields was part of some rather unsuccessful NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament teams, but did not let that bog him down. A four-year starter, Fields averaged 15 points and 6.1 rebounds per game, displaying dominance his senior year with 17.4 points and 6.9 rebounds per game.

    His consistent scoring years as a Bruin leave him at No. 17 on the all-time scoring list with 1638 points (15 avg.). Fields is also No. 20 on the all-time rebounds list with 667 (6.1 avg). He is also scattered in the UCLA record books in various categories:

    -Ninth in career field goals made: 868

    -Team leading scorer: 1983-84

    -Team leader in steals: 1983-84

    -Sixteenth in career 20-point games: 24

    -Seventh in career double-figure scoring games: 92

    Trivia: Fields was selected in the first round of the 1984 NBA draft by the Milwaukee Bucks and played four seasons in the NBA.

32. Darrick Martin (1989-92)

20 of 51

    Point guard Darrick Martin was a quick, agile player who was able to make plays happen. Dishing out passes to Tracy Murray, Mitchell Butler, and Don MacLean helped Martin earn the third-most career assists as a Bruin (636).

    Martin currently holds the record for most assists in an individual game at 15 in his junior season. He is also tied for sixth on the all-time steals list at 179 and second on the individual season steals list at 217.

    Trivia: In 2003, Martin played for the Harlem Globetrotters. 

31. Josh Shipp (2005-09)

21 of 51

    Forward Josh Shipp was not slowed down after having hip surgery and having to red-shirt his sophomore season. In his four seasons as a starter, Shipp averaged 12.3 points and 1.3 steals per game.

    As a red-shirt sophomore and junior, Shipp helped the Bruins reach the Final Four two consecutive years, winning the Pacific-10 as well. He is currently No. 12 on the all-time scoring list with 1734 points (12.4 avg.)

    Shipp is fourth in career three-point field goals made at 198, sixth in career steals with 179 and is eighth in career double-figure scoring games with 90.

    Trivia: Shipp holds the record for most career starts with 134. He plays basketball in Turkey as of 2011. 

30. Toby Bailey (1995-98)

22 of 51

    Shooting guard and small forward Toby Bailey was a big-time offensive producer as a Bruin from the very beginning. Bailey was a huge performer as a freshman in UCLA’s victory in the 1995 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament, scoring 26 points with nine rebounds in the championship game. His performance placed him on the All-Tournament Team that year.

    Bailey is one of two Bruins to achieve a triple-double (23 PTS 10 RB 10 AST). He is currently No. 5 on the all-time scoring list with 1846 points (14.3 avg.). His other establishments in the UCLA record books include:

     -Nineteenth in career rebounds: 670 (5.2 avg)

    -Sixth in career three-point field goals made: 171

    -Eighth in career assists: 458

    -Sixth in career double-figure scoring games: 94

    Trivia: Bailey has played on 14 different teams in his 11-year professional playing career, including teams in Italy, Belgium, Germany, Greece, China and Spain. 

29. Darren Collison (2006-09)

23 of 51

    Point guard Darren Collison was one of the scrappiest players in UCLA Men’s Basketball history. Collison was a dynamic player, always exercising his best effort on the court. In his first three seasons as a Bruin, he was a part of teams that reached the Final Four under Ben Howland.

    Collison had a solid career at UCLA, averaging 11.6 points, 4.1 assists, and 1.6 steals per game in his four seasons. He is currently No. 16 on the all-time scoring list and has his name on plenty of other record lists, including:

    -Fourth in career three-point percentage: 43.5 percent

    -Third in career free throw percentage: 85.1 percent

    -Fifth in career assists: 577

    -Second in career steals: 231

    -First in individual season three-point percentage: 52.5 percent (2008)

    -Fourth in career double-figure scoring games: 97

    Trivia: Collison holds the Bruin record for most consecutive free throws at 43 in his senior season over a 15-game stretch. 

28. Arron Afflalo (2005-07)

24 of 51

    Arron Afflalo played a vital role on three Bruin teams that contributed to the recent revival of UCLA Men’s Basketball under Ben Howland, whose first recruit was Afflalo.

    He was honored as an All-American his junior season on a team that went to the Final Four. Afflalo was also awarded Pac-10 Player of the Year that season with 17.4 points per game and a reputation as one of the best defenders in the NCAA of the season.

    In a tight game in the 2006 NCAA tournament, Afflalo made a game-winning three-pointer against Alabama in the Round of 32. The Bruins later went on to face Florida in the Finals that year.

    Trivia: Afflalo, alongside teammate Ryan Hollins, helped the distraught Gonzaga star Adam Morrison off the court after UCLA defeated Gonzaga in the Sweet 16 in the 2006 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament.

27. Earl Watson (1998-01)

25 of 51

    Point guard Earl Watson was a very unselfish player, only focusing on the ultimate goal of scoring points regardless of which player scored. In fact, Watson’s points-per-game stat decreased in his junior season only to have his assists per game increase (from 4.6 to 5.9).

    Watson was also an alert defender, and currently holds the all-time career for most steals at 235. His ability as a facilitator is apparent through other records such as:

    -Most assists in an individual game: 16

    -Fourth in career assists: 607

    He is currently No. 23 on the all-time scoring list with 1,449 points. Watson capped off his UCLA career well, averaging 14.7 points per game.

    Trivia: Watson holds the all-time record for minutes played with 4,371 minutes (33 mpg over 129 games)

26. Charles O’Bannon (1994-97)

26 of 51

    Forward Charles O’Bannon was a varsity-starter in all of his four years at UCLA, playing his first two seasons alongside his brother Ed. Charles stepped up as a sophomore and helped the Bruins win a NCAA Championship in 1995, averaging 13.6 points per game.

    Charles flourished in his final year as a Bruin in 1997, averaging 17.7 points per game and leading the Bruins to the Elite Eight in the NCAA Tournament. O’Bannon was named on the first team All-Pacific-10 in 1996 and 1997

    He is currently No. 10 on the all-time scoring list.

    Trivia: As of 2011, Charles O’Bannon plays in the Japanese Basketball League for the Panasonic Trians.

25. J.R. Henderson (1995-98)

27 of 51

    Forward J.R. Henderson was an immense offensive asset for the Bruins. In his four seasons at UCLA, he averaged 14.2 points and 6.4 rebounds per game, capping out in his senior season at 19 points and 7.8 rebounds per game.

    Henderson currently sits at No. 7 on the all-time scoring list and had the highest field goal percentage on the team in his senior season at 53.6 percent. He is currently fifth in career double-figure scoring games at 95 and fifth as well in career free throws made at 435.

    Trivia: Henderson currently plays basketball in Japan and has changed his name to “J.R. Sakuragi” when he became a naturalized Japanese citizen. 

24. Richard Washington (1974-76)

28 of 51

    Center and forward Richard Washington filled the void when Bill Walton graduated in 1974. In his two seasons as a starter, Washington averaged 15.9 and 20.1 points per game respectively.

    As a sophomore, Washington led the Bruins to their last NCAA championship under John Wooden, scoring 28 points with 12 rebounds in the Finals and earning the Most Outstanding Player of the Tournament award.

    Washington exploded as a junior, averaging 20.1 points and 8.6 rebounds per game. He maintains the seventh-highest scoring average for a junior and has the sixth-most field goals scored for an individual season with 276.

    He is also No. 14 in career 20-point games as a Bruin with 25 and was honored as an all-American in his junior season.

    Trivia: As of 2011, Washington is No. 34 on the all-time scoring list with 1235 points (14.2 avg.). 

23. Dave Greenwood (1976-79)

29 of 51

    Forward Dave Greenwood excelled greatly in a starting role during his sophomore season as a Bruin. During his three starting seasons, Greenwood proved his dominance on the court averaging a career-high 19.9 points 10.3 rebounds per game in his senior season.

    Under two different head coaches, Greenwood helped lead the Bruins into three consecutive Sweet 16 campaigns. He is currently No. 13 on the all-time scoring list with 1721 points (14.6 avg.) and is dotted across the records books:

    -Third in career rebounds: 1022 (8.7 avg)

    -Fifth in career field goals made: 707

    -Second in individual season blocked shots: 76 (1979)

    -Third in career double-figure rebounding games: 52

    Trivia: Greenwood was the second pick in the 1979 NBA draft. The first—Magic Johnson.

22. Jason Kapono (2000-03)

30 of 51

    Shooting guard Jason Kapono was one of the most consistent shooting machines in recent Bruin history, coming out of the gates his freshman year scoring 16 points per game and averaging 16.5 in his career at UCLA.

    Kapono was best known for his three-point shooting ability, and currently holds the record for most three-pointers in one game at nine. He is currently speckled throughout the UCLA record books:

    -Third in all-time career scoring: 2095 points (16.5 avg.)

    -Seventh in career field goals made: 699

    -Second in career three-point field goal percentage: 44.6 percent

    -First in career three-point field goals made: 317

    -Fifth in free throw percentage: 83 percent

    -Second in career double-figure scoring games: 107 (out of 127)

    Trivia: Kapono has won the Three-Point Shootout twice in the NBA, and is known to be one of the most accurate three-point shooters in NBA history (ranked fifth all-time in NBA as of 2011 [43.7 percent]) 

21. Tyus Edney (1992-95)

31 of 51

    Point guard Tynus Edney is best known for his game-winning drive down the court with 4.8 seconds left against Missouri in the second round of the 1995 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. The Bruins would reign as NCAA Champion that year, which would not have been possible if Edney had not performed in the clutch.

    Edney was named the Bruin’s most valuable player his sophomore season with 13.6 points and 5.6 assists per game. His ability as a facilitator peaked his senior season, dishing out 6.8 assists per game.

    He currently holds the record for most steals in a game (11), ranks second in career assists (652), and ranks twentieth on the all-time scoring list. Edney was an All-Pacific-10 player three years in-a-row and won the Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award his senior season as the nation’s best player under six feet tall.

    Trivia: Edney was appointed as Director of Operations for the UCLA Men’s Basketball team in 2010.

20. Willie Naulls (1954-56)

32 of 51

    Center Willie Naulls was dominant in the key, averaging 15.5 points and 11.4 rebounds per game in his three years as a starter at UCLA. In his senior season, Naulls helped the Bruins win the conference with a perfect 16-0 record.

    Naulls’ dominance in the key is echoed by the record books. He holds the record for most rebounds in a single game (28-1956) amongst others:

    -Thirty-fifth in all-time scoring: 1225 pts (15.5 avg)

    -Sixth in all-time rebounds: 900 (11.4 avg.)

    -Seventh in individual season rebounds: 410 (14.6 avg-1956)

    -Third in average points scored for a senior: 23.6

    -Fifth in career double-doubles: 45

    -Fifth in career double-figure rebounding game: 42

    Naulls was named a second-team All-American his senior season.

    Trivia: Naulls went on to be a four-time NBA All-Star and three-time NBA Champion with the Boston Celtics. He was the first African-American player to be named captain of a major professional sports team.

19. Kiki Vandeweghe (1977-80)

33 of 51

    Forward Kiki Vandeweghe thrived as a starter in his junior and senior seasons as a Bruin. Vandeweghe shined the most in his senior season, averaging 19.5 points and 6.8 rebounds per game. That season, Vandeweghe led the Bruins to the NCAA Finals for the first time with a team that was not coached by John Wooden.

    Vandeweghe is currently No. 26 on the all-time scoring list with 1,380 points (12.2 avg). He also maintains the fifth-highest career field goal percentage at 57 percent.

    Trivia: Ernest Maurice “Kiki” Vandeweghe II, born in West Germany to a former NBA player and the winner of the 1952 Miss American pageant, served as interim head coach for the New Jersey Nets in the 2009-10 NBA Season.

18. Baron Davis (1998-99)

34 of 51

    Point guard Baron Davis was a highly sought-after recruit who chose UCLA due to its proximity to his family in Los Angeles. Davis came out strong in his freshman year and was named Pac-10 Freshman of the Year.

    Davis was a consistent threat on both sides of the court, averaging 13.6 points per game in his career as a Bruin and leading the team in steals during both of his two seasons at UCLA.

    He led the team in points scored (429- 15.9 avg.) as well as steals (68- 2.5 avg.) his sophomore year. Davis ended his career as a Bruin after the 1999 season, being drafted by the Charlotte Hornets as the third overall pick.

    Trivia: Davis received a scholarship at Crossroads High School in Santa Monica, California. 

17. Curtis Rowe (1969-71)

35 of 51

    Forward Curtis Rowe was a three-year starter in the middle of the UCLA’s NCAA Championship dynasty under John Wooden. Averaging 15.2 points and 8.8 rebounds per game, Rowe helped the Bruins win three consecutive championships.

    Rowe had a key performance in the 1970 NCAA Finals, scoring 19 points with eight rebounds, and was later named to the All-Tournament Team that year. He is currently No. 27 on the all-time scoring list with 1371 points (15.2 avg) and No. 13 on the all-time rebounding list with 796 rebounds (8.8 avg.).

    Rowe is also No. 17 on the individual season rebounds list with 299 (10 avg.) in his senior season.

    Trivia: Rowe played eight seasons in the NBA, averaging 11.6 points per game and becoming an All-Star in 1976. 

16. Lucius Allen (1967-69)

36 of 51

    Point guard Lucius Allen, alongside Lew Alcindor and Mike Warren, was considered to be part of the greatest college basketball team in history in 1968, when UCLA took home its second out of seven consecutive NCAA titles.

    In his two years on the varsity squad, Allen averaged 15.3 points per game. He was named on the All-Tournament Team when the Bruins won the NCAA Championship in 1967 and again in 1968 with another NCAA Title.

    Trivia: Allen was drafted as the No. 3 overall pick by the Seattle Supersonics in the first round of the 1969 NBA draft. 

15. Tracy Murray (1990-92)

37 of 51

    Forward Tracy Murray turned it on offensively in his sophomore and junior seasons, averaging over 21 points in both seasons, making himself a hot asset for the 1992 NBA draft and earning second place for average points in a sophomore season with 21.2, behind Lew Alcindor.

    Murray’s name constantly pops up the Bruins record book in offensive stats, including:

    -Ninth in career points: 1792

    -Sixth in career three-point percentage: 41.1 percent

    -Ninth in individual season field goals: 247

    -Fifth in career 20-point games: 46

    He is also ranked eighth in career blocks at 91. Murray established his name well in the Bruin record books in his three seasons at UCLA.

    Trivia: After playing with six different NBA franchises, Murray played basketball in Greece. He completed a degree in history from UCLA after his playing career ended. 

14. Kevin Love (2008)

38 of 51

    Center Kevin Love was dominant in his one season as a Bruin, averaging 17.5 points and 10.6 rebounds per game. Love was a key inside component for the Bruins on their quest to the Final Four in 2008.

    Although Love only played one season with the Bruins, he finds himself scattered in the record books:

    -Seventh in career field goal percentage: 55.9 percent

    -Sixth in individual season rebounds: 415 (10.6 avg.)

    -Third in individual season free throws made: 198

    -Seventh in individual season blocks: 56

    -Second highest freshman points per game: 17.5

    -First in freshman rebounds per game: 10.6

    -First in single-season double-scoring games: 39

    The Bruins would have loved to have the first-team All-American and Pac-10 Player of the year around for a few more seasons to have a run at an NCAA Championship.

    Trivia: Kevin’s uncle, Mike Love, is a singer for The Beach Boys.

13. Trevor Wilson (1987-90)

39 of 51

    Forward Trevor Wilson lit up the court when he became a starter his sophomore season, in which he averaged 15.4 points and 9.4 rebounds per game. At times an almost unstoppable offensive threat, Wilson landed himself at No. 8 on the all-time scoring list with 1,798 points (14.3 avg.)

    Wilson helped lead the Bruins to the Sweet Sixteen in his senior season, averaging 17.2 points and 9.1 rebounds per game. His other feats in Bruin record books include:

    -Fourth in career rebounds: 1,001 (7.9 avg.)

    -Sixth in career field goals made: 706

    -Sixth in rebounds per game for a sophomore: 9.4

    -Tenth in career 20-point games: 31

    -Fifth in career double-figure rebounding games: 42

    Trivia: According to the L.A. Times, Wilson was dismissed from his high school team in 1985 due to “violations of team rules and his continued disregard of [their] program and its objectives.” The All-American high school star returned to the team a few months later after resolving his differences with his teammates and coach. 

12. Pooh Richardson (1986-89)

40 of 51

    Point guard Pooh Richardson is arguably the greatest facilitator in UCLA recorded history. Richardson’s assists per game climbed each season during his four years as a Bruin, reaching an amazing 7.6 in his senior year and leaving him with an average on 6.8 in his career.

    Richardson performed as a passer and a shooter, turning on his offensive production in his senior year to average 15.2 points per game. His high ranks in the UCLA record books in both offensive and defensive categories include:

    -Highest three-point field goal percentage: 46.4 percent

    -Most career assists: 833 (the next player on the list has 181 less)

    -Fifth in career steals: 189

    -Most individual season assists: 236 (1989)

    -Twenty-first on the all-time scoring list: 1461 pts. (12 avg.)

    Trivia: Jerome “Pooh” Richardson’s nickname came from his grandmother, who thought Richardson resembled Winnie the Pooh.

11. Henry Bibby (1970-72)

41 of 51

    Point guard Henry Bibby was a role player in the three consecutive championships that the Bruins won during his seasons as a varsity starter. In those three seasons, Bibby averaged 14.4 points per game in his career at UCLA and is at No. 32 on the all-time scoring list with 1293 points.

    He performed well in the 1972 NCAA championship game, playing the entire game and scoring 18 points. Bibby was also known for being accurate from the free throw line and ranks seventh in career free throw percentage at 82.3 percent.

    Bibby was honored as an All-American in his senior season.

    Trivia: Henry Bibby, father of NBA guard Mike Bibby, coached at USC for nine seasons. 

10. Don MacLean (1989-92)

42 of 51

    Forward Don MacLean made his mark as a Bruin from the very beginning, starting as a freshman and averaging 18.6 points and 7.5 rebounds per game. MacLean went on to average 20.5 points per game, peaking in his junior season with 23 points per game.

    MacLean is the current all-time leading scoring in UCLA basketball history with 2,608 points (Lew Alcindor had 2,325 in three seasons played. Freshmen weren’t allowed to play on the varsity squad until 1972.) He also hold a plethora of other UCLA records, including:

    -Most career free-throws made: 711

    -Most career league points: 1,486

    -Most points averaged by a freshman: 18.6

    -Most career 20-point games: 68

    -Most career double-figure scoring games: 123 (68 straight)

    Trivia: As of 2011, MacLean is an analyst for the UCLA ISP Sports Network during the UCLA basketball season.

9. Ed O’Bannon (1992-95)

43 of 51

    Forward Ed O’Bannon had a rocky start to his career as a Bruin, severely injuring his knee and subsequently having surgery before his freshman season at UCLA.

    O’Bannon shined as a senior at UCLA, becoming an All-American while leading the Bruins to their first NCAA Championship in 20 years. In his senior season, he averaged 20.4 points and 8.3 per game, worthy of the USBWA College Player of the Year.

    In the 1995 NCAA Final, O’Bannon took the Bruins on his back, scoring 30 points and pulling in 17 rebounds, earning him the Most Outstanding Player award of the Tournament.

    His No. 31 was retired at UCLA in 1996.

    Trivia: O’Bannon returned to UCLA in 2011 to finish his bachelor’s degree, which he is expected to finish later in the year. 

8. Sidney Wicks (1969-71)

44 of 51

    Forward Sidney Wicks was a great contributor to two back-to-back NCAA titles in his junior and senior seasons as a starter. In his first season as starter his junior year, Wicks was named Most Outstanding Player of the NCAA Tournament during a year in which he averaged 18.6 points and 11.9 rebounds per game.

    Wicks continued to excel in his senior season, averaging an impressive 21.3 points and 12.8 rebounds per game during a season that brought home another NCAA title to the Bruins. He received the USBWA Player of the Year award that year as well.

    The UCLA records books are filled with Wicks’ name:

    -Twenty-fourth all-time scorer: 1,423 pts. (15.8 avg.)

    -Ninth in career rebounds: 894 (9.9 avg.)

    -Seventh in average points scored for a senior: 21.3

    -Fourth in rebounds averaged for a senior: 12.8

    -Fourth in career double-doubles: 46

    His No. 35 was retired at UCLA in 1996.

    Trivia: Wicks earned Academic All-American honors in 1971, earning a degree in sociology. 

7. Jamaal (Keith) Wilkes (1972-74)

45 of 51

    Forward Keith Wilkes made an impact from the time he stepped on the court as a starter his sophomore year, averaging 13.5 points and 8.2 rebounds that year. Wilkes helped the Bruins win the 1972 NCAA Championship by putting up 23 points with 10 rebounds, being named to the All-Tournament Team

    Over his three-year career at UCLA, Wilkes averaged 15 points and 7.4 rebounds per game, earning him No. 30 on the all-time scoring list with 1,349 points (15 avg.) and No. 21 in career rebounds with 663 rebounds (7.4 avg.).

    Wilkes was named an All-American in his junior and senior seasons.

    Trivia: Wilkes was named NBA Rookie of the Year in 1975, was a three-time All-Star and won four championship rings with the Los Angeles Lakers.  

6. Reggie Miller (1984-87)

46 of 51

    Shooting guard Reggie Miller had some memorable moments in his career as a Bruin, including a game against Louisville in his senior season in which he scored a career-high 42 points, scoring 33 points alone in the second half. Miller scored only six of those points from behind the arc despite the three-point line’s establishment in the NCAA in 1987.

    Miller was a scoring machine as a Bruin, and is second all-time behind Lew Alcindor in both average points scored in a single season (25.9-1986) and most career 30-point games (16). He ranks third on the all-time scoring list with 2095 points (17.2 avg.).

    He also holds the individual season records of most league points scored (500-1986) and highest league scoring average (27.8-1986). Although the Bruins were not very successful as a team during Miller’s UCLA career, he led the team to a NIT Championship in 1985 and was named Most Valuable Player of the tournament.

    Trivia: Miller holds the UCLA individual season record for free throws made at 202 in 1986. 

5. Walt Hazzard (1962-64)

47 of 51

    Point guard Walt Hazzard led the Bruins to their first ever NCAA Championship during his senior season, in which UCLA had a perfect record of 30-0. The three-year starter was a two-time All-American and was named Most Outstanding Player of the 1964 NCAA Tournament.

    Walt averaged 16.1 points per game in his career as a Bruin, peaking at 18.6 points per game in his senior season. With the combination of Hazzard and Gail Goodrich on the floor, who averaged 21.5 points in the 1964, the Bruins were destined for success.

    He is currently No. 25 on the all-time scoring list at 1401 points (16.1 avg.). Hazzard’s No. 42 was retired in 1996.

    Trivia: Hazzard came back to the UCLA Basketball program to coach from 1985-88. His overall record as a coach was 77-47.

4. Marques Johnson (1974-77)

48 of 51

    Forward Marques Johnson helped the Bruins win their final NCAA Championship under John Wooden in 1975 as a sophomore.

    Johnson continued to excel under new head coach Gene Bartow, putting up 17.3 points per game in his junior season. He peaked in his senior season, scoring 21.4 points and pulling in 11.1 rebounds per game, going on to receive the USBWA College Player of the Year Award.

    He won the first-ever John. R. Wooden Award in 1977. Johnson’s No. 54 was retired at UCLA in 1996.

    Trivia: “When he was asked to express what the return of the dunk [in 1976] meant to him… ‘It was like I was reborn,’ Johnson responded” (Inside Sports Magazine: College Basketball. Michael Douchant. Visible Ink Press, 1998).

3. Gail Goodrich (1963-65)

49 of 51

    Point guard Gail Goodrich was a key player in establishing UCLA’s dynasty under John Wooden, leading the Bruins in scoring in 1964 and 1965 towards an NCAA Championship.

    In his junior season, Goodrich was part of a team that went in the record books by becoming the first team in UCLA history to have a perfect record of 30-0 in 1964, which led the Bruins to their first NCAA Championship in school history.

    He averaged an impressive 21.5 points per game in the 1964 season, surpassing that with 24.8 points per game in his final season as a Bruin. Goodrich was named on the NCAA All-Tournament Team both of those years and was honored an All-American his senior year.

    Goodrich topped off his UCLA career with a bang, scoring 42 points in a winning NCAA Championship game against Michigan (91-80) in 1965.

    His No. 25 was retired at UCLA in 2004.

    Trivia: Goodrich was originally considering attending USC after the legacy of his father but was swayed by John Wooden’s interest in him to attend UCLA. 

2. Bill Walton (1972-1974)

50 of 51

    Bill Walton was one of the best all-around centers to play college basketball with the combination of his skilled offense and intimidating defense. In the 1972 and 1973 seasons, Walton spearheaded two teams that went a combined 60-0, winning the NCAA Championship in both years with an average scoring margin of 30 points.

    Walton was showered in awards as a collegiate athlete, including:

    -Naismith College Player of the Year (1972-74)

    -USBWA College Player of the Year (1972-74)

    -First Team All-American (1972-74)

    -Most Outstanding Player in NCAA Tournament (1972, 1973)

    His all-time UCLA achievements include:

    -Most career rebounds: 1,370 (15.7 avg.)

    -Second-highest field goal percentage: .651

    -Third-highest career scoring average: 20.3

    -Most rebounds in a season: 506

    Walton had 27 rebounds in one game twice. His No. 32 was retired at UCLA in 1990.

    Trivia: Walton earned Academic All-American honors in all three of his varsity seasons at UCLA (1972, 1973, 1974). 

1. Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar)(1967-69)

51 of 51

    Lew Alcindor went down in the UCLA record books as the best Bruin ever in his three seasons under John Wooden. He received many accolades as a collegiate athlete, including:

    -Player of the Year (1967, 1969)         

    -First Team All-American (1967-69)

    -Most Outstanding Player in NCAA Tournament (1967-69)

    -Naismith College Player of the Year (1969-first year awarded)

    In three seasons with the Bruins, Alcindor contributed greatly to a NCAA Championship. In his varsity debut against USC, Lew scored 56 points, immediately displaying his dominance as a collegiate athlete. Alcindor holds an immense amount of records at UCLA, including:

    -Most points in a season: 870 (1967)

    -Highest career scoring average: 26.4

    -Most points in a single game: 61

    -Most career field goals (943- tied)

    Alcindor’s No. 33 was retired at UCLA in 1990.

    Trivia: The dunk was banned in college basketball after 1967 predominantly due to Alcindor’s dominant use of it in his first collegiate season. The ban was revoked in 1976.