10 Reasons to Attend the 2009 U.S. Open

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10 Reasons to Attend the 2009 U.S. Open
(Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for USTA)

The 2009 U.S. Open presented by the United States Tennis Association is THE showcase event for Tennis in North America.  Running August 31st, to September 13 in New York City, you'll have an opportunity to watch the worlds top Tennis athletes vying for the final slam of the season.  No, I'm not being paid by the U.S.T.A, but I certainly sound like it!

I've attended the Open twice now, travelling from Toronto, Ontario to New York with my wife.  It's about a nine hour drive from our house, but worth every second we spend in that fabulous village named New York.  Our first year, we had the pleasure of watching Federer take out Agassi in the finals.  It was a 90-10 crowd split in favor of Agassi, however my wife and I remained loyal Federer fans and tried to voice support despite the pro-Agassi crowd.  Our second year, we tried something different and toured the outside courts and stands enjoying a thrilling Davenport victory, a Safin victory, a Davydenko grudge match, and a spattering of other wars. 

There are many reasons to attend the U.S. Open, and we all know there are many excuses not to attend (T.V., money, distance...etc...).

I think you should attend though, and now (finally?) I'll present to you the top ten reasons to attend the 2009 U.S. Open:

  1. Stay, dine, and party in Manhattan...There are few cities in the world that can compete with Manhattan in this area.
  2. Mens depth - The depth of the mens game right now is ultra-strong, pick a day and there's a good chance you'll watch something special.
  3. Williams sisters - If you aren't a fan, become one now.  It's New York, they have oodles of slams between them, and they love a New York night.
  4. Comebacks and Retirements - Kim Clijsters, and Sharapova are back, while Marat Safin is taking off.  Kim was missed by the hardcore fan, Sharapova was missed by the casual, while Safin will be missed by everyone with a sense of humor and a eye for sickening talent.
  5. Food - The food is overpriced and mediocre, but time flies sitting in the eating areas watching the fans go by.  The U.S. Open is a fantastic place to simply people watch.
  6. Roger Federer - He's playing well, he's officially a living legend, and the guy isn't going to be playing forever.  If you haven't watched him live (and at the Open), do it.  I was at times, mesmerized watching him dismantle Agassi in that final.
  7. Elena Dementieva - She dominated Serena despite a loss at Wimbledon.  She then again dominated her in Toronto in a victory, and Elena is one of very few who can not only match Serena in physical fortitude, but also surpass her.  There's another Alpha out there folks.
  8. The Stars - Not only can you get up close to Tennis stars, particularly in the practice areas as they come and go, but you'll see the likes of Matthew Perry, Donald Trump...etc...should you be lucky enough.
  9. The Night Match - No where in the world, at any time will you be able to find yourself amongst 20,000 screaming fans, under the lights, cheering on your favorite tennis star at the top of your lungs...and it be considered normal.  You just can't describe what that New York air does to a Tennis fan, it's remarkable, and a remarkable feeling.
  10. The Grudge Match - While we can certainly see this with the women, I'm speaking particularly about the men here.  Day or night, first or second week, go find a match that appears to be heading into a five set war.  These are serious athletes, with serious talent, and a mental toughness that is unmistakable.  It's inspiring to watch someone draw deep into the third (or fourth) hour of a match, fighting for their life trying to win that battle.  Watch their expressions, their feet, and even the crowd around you.  You'll only find this at a slam, and it's the only one in North America.

Now get in your car! ;)

MarkOskar

The Tennis News Authority

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