What Is the Davis Cup?

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What Is the Davis Cup?

Before someone jumps the gun and gleefully advices "Google it," I would love to dodge that bullet and say I am not going to Google it.

I've been watching tennis for quite some time now, but I never understood the intricacies of the Davis Cup. The only thing I remember of this special cup of tennis to few fans, which is played between countries, is Spain was the last year's winner.

There are Grand Slams and then there is one tournament that does not have the vigor and color of a Slam, the Davis Cup. It lacks fans in the stadium, lower preference is given by the top ranked players and to (someone tell me) the prize money.

The fact that it is played year round instead of being wrapped up in quick time is quite boring to fans. With players prior commitments unaltered and being themselves unavailable for all the matches, probably is one of the reasons why it is not ranked quite high in the priority list of ATP players as a Grand Slam.

In addition to the above mentioned things, there are few things that I am unable to fathom whenever I see a news article on Davis Cup.

Each team invites some countries to their nation and fight like it is the ultimate battle.

It is not as if one team is inviting all other countries, which could avoid confusion. There are different countries playing on their favorite surfaces at different places at the same time. 

They would probably stop and resume their invitations after couple of months to play the next rounds. During the stoppage fans are expected to remember which country is playing which one and also has to keep track of their favorite schedule of play for the day. Plus, are there multiple Davis Cup winners in different parts of the world?

This is the only Cup in tennis that is played as a team by one nation. If the organizers do not want to push this event into history books, then they have to schedule it in such a way that it does not clash with the bigger tournaments. In doing so, they can attract more fans, avoid opinion based articles in B/R on Davis Cup, rope in top players, and also mint some money during the process.

Tough five setters, which are played in this tournament stay for a transient amount of time in the fans mind. "Yeah, it needs a overhaul mate", quips a fan's inner voice.

If the fans and the concerned sports authorities are not really cherishing it, then does it not affect the psyche of the players who had finished a slug fest with his opponent for just one dead rubber victory? Doesn't the player who has moved up the ladder in his singles career think twice to participate in the same tournament where he once played his heart-out for a win?

If the organizers really want to lift the Davis Cup tradition from ground levels to the stratospheric one, then they should have concrete plans to attract the younger folk into the game. If they want to keep the tradition alive, then it's high time they begin marketing in a grandiose way to have a fun-filled passionate atmosphere for the players and the fans alike.

PS: For the Davis Cup enthusiasts, this is the Googled Wikipedia link.

 

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