Wimbledon 2021 TV Schedule and Live Stream Daily Listings for Entire Tournament

Jake RillFeatured Columnist IJune 27, 2021

Wimbledon 2021 TV Schedule and Live Stream Daily Listings for Entire Tournament

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    David Gray/Associated Press

    Novak Djokovic has continued to rack up Grand Slam titles in 2021, and the Serb may soon be making it a three-way tie with Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal for the most in men's singles tennis history.

    With Wimbledon set to begin Monday, Djokovic will be looking to win the 20th major tournament of his career. He's won both Grand Slam events in 2021, capturing the titles at the Australian Open in February and the French Open earlier in June.

    Some notable names will be missing at this year's Wimbledon, which is the first to be held since 2019 because of last year's tournament's cancellation as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Rafael Nadal and Dominic Thiem aren't playing on the men's side, while Naomi Osaka and defending champion Simona Halep are out on the women's side.

    Still, there's plenty of strong competition in both men's and women's singles action that should make Wimbledon an exciting tournament—especially if Djokovic and/or Serena Williams (23 career Grand Slam titles) can make history.

    Here's everything you need to know with Wimbledon set to start Monday.

Complete Tournament Schedule

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    Jon Super/Associated Press

    Monday, June 28

    First round, 6-11:30 a.m. ET, ESPN

    First round, 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. ET, ESPN2

                 

    Tuesday, June 29

    First round, 6-11:30 a.m. ET, ESPN

    First round, 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. ET, ESPN2

           

    Wednesday, June 30

    Second round, 6 a.m.-4:30 p.m. ET, ESPN

               

    Thursday, July 1

    Second round, 6 a.m.-4:30 p.m. ET, ESPN

               

    Friday, July 2

    Third round, 6-11:30 a.m. ET, ESPN

    Third round, 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. ET, ESPN2

             

    Saturday, July 3

    Third round, 8-11:30 a.m. ET, ESPN

    Third round, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. ET, ESPN2

    Third round, 2-5 p.m. ET, ESPN

             

    Monday, July 5

    Round of 16, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. ET, ESPN

    Round of 16, 6 a.m.-4 p.m. ET, ESPN2

              

    Tuesday, July 6

    Women's quarterfinals, 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. ET, ESPN

    Women's quarterfinals, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. ET, ESPN2

              

    Wednesday, July 7

    Men's quarterfinals, 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. ET, ESPN

    Men's quarterfinals, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. ET, ESPN2

               

    Thursday, July 8

    Women's semifinals, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. ET, ESPN

             

    Friday, July 9

    Men's semifinals, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. ET, ESPN

             

    Saturday, July 10

    Women's final, 8:45-11:30 a.m. ET, ESPN

                  

    Sunday, July 11

    Men's final, 8:45 a.m.-1 p.m. ET, ESPN

    All coverage can be streamed on the ESPN app.

Men's Preview

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    David Gray/Associated Press

    Djokovic (the No. 1 seed) and Federer (No. 6) are on opposite sides of the draw, so it's possible that they could meet in the final. But first, the two all-time greats will have to get there.

    For Djokovic, that may not be an issue. He's been nearly unbeatable at major tournaments in recent years, winning seven of the past 11 Grand Slam events. The 34-year-old is also a two-time defending champion at Wimbledon.

    Considering the roll Djokovic has been on—and the fact that he's a five-time Wimbledon champion, including winning four of the past six—it seems unlikely he gets knocked off before getting the chance to play for another title.

    But no men's singles player has been more successful at Wimbledon than Federer, who holds the tournament record with eight championship victories. He won the event every year from 2003-07, but he's only won once in the past seven editions of the tourney (which was in 2017).

    Federer also hasn't won a Grand Slam title since the 2018 Australian Open, as his health has been an issue. The 39-year-old missed three major tournaments while recovering from surgeries to both knees, and he withdrew from this year's French Open before the fourth round in order to rest ahead of Wimbledon.

    Djokovic has won five of his past six matches against Federer, which includes victories in the 2019 Wimbledon final and the 2020 Australian Open semifinals (their most recent meeting).

    If anybody is going to prevent a Djokovic-Federer final, it could be either No. 2-seeded Daniil Medvedev or No. 3-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas, each of whom is seeking his first career Grand Slam title. Medvedev lost to Djokovic in the final of this year's Australian Open, while Tsitsipas fell to Djokovic in this year's French Open final. Neither has previously made it further than the fourth round at Wimbledon.

Women's Preview

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    Thibault Camus/Associated Press

    Earlier in June, the two women's singles players left standing in the French Open were No. 31-seeded Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova and unseeded Barbora Krejcikova, a match the latter won in three sets to claim her first Grand Slam title.

    That match came about because of number of the top players who suffered upsets long before the end of the tournament. Now, those women will be looking for bounce-back performances at Wimbledon.

    Ashleigh Barty is the No. 1 seed despite losing in the second round of the French Open. Since winning the 2019 French Open to capture her first career Grand Slam title, Barty hasn't made it past the semifinals at a major tournament. She's also never made it past the fourth round at Wimbledon.

    No. 2-seeded Aryna Sabalenka and No. 3-seeded Elina Svitolina are both seeking their first Grand Slam titles. Svitolina reached the semifinals at Wimbledon in 2019, while Sabalenka has never made it past the second round in SW19.

    Sofia Kenin (No. 4) hasn't made it past the second round at Wimbledon, either, but she's been better since her most recent appearance at the tournament in 2019. She won her first Grand Slam title at the 2020 Australian Open, and she's reached at least the fourth round in three of four major tournaments since.

    Of course, many eyes will be on Serena Williams, who remains one Grand Slam title away from tying Margaret Court's all-time record of 24. Williams has been unsuccessful in each of her past 12 appearances at major tournaments and hasn't made it further than the semifinals in any of the past five.

    But Williams is a seven-time Wimbledon champion (having last won in 2016), and she reached the finals of the tournament in both 2018 and 2019. With top players such as Osaka and Halep not in the field, this could be Williams' best chance to win a Grand Slam title for some time.

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