Dikembe Mutombo's Son Ryan Commits to Georgetown

Tim Daniels@TimDanielsBRFeatured ColumnistOctober 5, 2020

Photo Credit: 247Sports

Ryan Mutombo, the son of Basketball Hall of Fame center Dikembe Mutombo, committed to play college basketball at Georgetown.

Mutombo is a 4-star prospect and the 80th-ranked player in the 2021 recruiting class, according to 247Sports' composite rankings. He's also listed as the 14th-best center and the No. 4 player coming out of Georgia among next year's incoming group.

The Atlanta native already features an impressive combination of size (6'11", 235 lbs) and athleticism, the same attributes that helped make his dad an NBA star, but he's also been working to expand his play to fit the modern game. It's helped elevate his long-term outlook.

"The next step for me in college is definitely to become at least a 35-percent three-point shooter," he told 247Sports' Evan Daniels in June. "That's the next step for me, and I think that's going to take my game to the next level I think."

Mutombo put together a strong junior season at both ends of the floor, and then he watched as the scholarship offers from Power 5 programs started to roll in.

"I'm assuming the offers came from schools watching my games from this year," he told Rivals' Dan McDonald in April. "Now that everybody is stuck in quarantine [because of COVID-19] and not able to go out, the coaches are starting to watch film this from this year."

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He's also worked to add more strength to his frame, which is usually a multiyear process for seven-foot post players who grew at a rapid rate throughout high school:

The entire development package made the center one of the fastest-rising prospects in the 2021 class.

Mutombo's biggest initial impact with the Hoyas, his father's alma mater, figures to come defensively. His ability to block and alter shots has already reached a near-NBA level, and the weight gain will go a long way in helping him contend with collegiate post players.

The other areas of his game are still in progress, which may make him more of a two-year project for Patrick Ewing at Georgetown than a one-and-done prospect. That said, he's showcased all the tools to eventually become a lottery pick in the NBA draft if his progress continues at its recent rate.