B/R MLB 300: Ranking the Overall Top 300 Players

Zachary D. Rymer@zachrymerMLB Lead WriterOctober 6, 2016

B/R MLB 300: Ranking the Overall Top 300 Players

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    Over the past few weeks, the 2016 Bleacher Report MLB 300 has been ranking the top players at each individual position. Now it's time for the grand finale: the complete list.

    In case you're just now joining us, the goal of the B/R MLB 300 is to rank the best players from the 2016 season by analyzing their assorted talents and scoring them accordingly. For more on how each individual position was approached, you can go straight to the source:

    With all the scores accounted for, now it's time to put all 300 players on one list for a definitive look at the top players in Major League Baseball for 2016.

    As you go, there are a few things to keep in mind. Many players are tied with the same score, in which case higher ranks became judgment calls. Also, the stats within are current as of the publication date of the given player's positional ranking.

    Take it away.

300-251: Alvarez-Fister

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    300. Pedro Alvarez, DH, Baltimore Orioles 

    43/80

    The fact that Pedro Alvarez is only a part-time DH means his value only goes so high. He's lived up to his job description, however, using a whole bunch of hard contact to cement himself as an above-average hitter.

    299. Greg Garcia, SS, St. Louis Cardinals 

    43/100

    Greg Garcia has little power and speed, and he has been less than flawless on defense, so it's a good thing he has an excellent on-base talent.

    298. Marwin Gonzalez, 1B, Houston Astros 

    44/100

    You won't get anyone to call Marwin Gonzalez an exciting player. But with some pop in his bat, speed in his legs and a glove that can play anywhere, he's definitely useful.

    297. Yunel Escobar, 3B, Los Angeles Angels 

    45/100

    Yunel Escobar has revitalized his hit tool in the last couple of years by reinventing himself into a pretty good slap hitter. But since that's his only talent, it's not worth that much.

    296. C.J. Cron, 1B, Los Angeles Angels 

    46/100

    There's a playing-time penalty and a few nits to pick here, but no one should ignore that C.J. Cron is advancing as both an offensive and defensive talent.

    295. Derek Dietrich, 2B, Miami Marlins 

    46/100

    Without a good glove or good legs, Derek Dietrich needs to hit in order to earn his keep. Fortunately for him, the approach he's used in 2016 has allowed for greater consistency at the dish.

    294. Tim Anderson, SS, Chicago White Sox 

    46/100

    In his first taste of the big leagues, Tim Anderson has been as advertised. He packs a solid bat and some impressive athleticism, but his technique needs fine-tuning on both sides of the ball.

    293. Kendrys Morales, DH, KC Royals 

    46/80

    Morales has been mostly good since a slow start in April and May, mainly by clobbering the ball en route to more power than he featured in 2015. On the whole, though, he hasn't been as consistent.

    292. Cody Allen, RP, Cleveland Indians 

    47/80

    Cody Allen served up too much hard contact in 2016, a reality of him changing his approach with his fastball and curveball. But both pitches still missed plenty of bats, allowing him to limit the damage.

    291. Tyler Thornburg, RP, Milwaukee Brewers 

    47/80

    Tyler Thornburg had a good dynamic going between the vertical action on his fastball and the downward action on his curveball, making him tough to hit. He's not a command artist, however, and he was hit harder than his low home run rate indicates.

    290. Craig Kimbrel, RP, Boston Red Sox 

    47/80

    Craig Kimbrel still has the wicked stuff to miss bats, which keeps him out of trouble more often than not. But with poor control and a fading ability to miss barrels, he's no longer a flawless reliever.

    289. Miguel Sano, 3B, Minnesota Twins 

    47/100

    The most appealing aspects of Miguel Sano's game are still his booming power and his outstanding batting eye. Now he just needs others to go with them.

    288. Blake Snell, SP, Tampa Bay Rays 

    47/100

    The negatives here are obvious: Blake Snell has gotten limited exposure (86.1 innings in 18 starts) and has battled control struggles with a 5.2 walks per nine innings. An inconsistent arm slot, which he may not fix until he adds more weight to his 6'4", 180-pound frame, hasn't helped the latter. There's a lot to like about the action on his pitches, though, which has helped him secure a 9.8 strikeouts per nine innings and a solid exit velocity.

    287. David Phelps, RP, Miami Marlins 

    48/80

    An oblique injury and a few spot starts helped hide David Phelps among fellow dominant relievers. But make no mistake, his good command and arsenal of moving hard stuff made him a tough matchup.

    286. Sam Dyson, RP, Texas Rangers 

    48/80

    The book on Sam Dyson got around in 2016, allowing hitters to erase some of the dominance he enjoyed last year. However, hard-throwing relievers with good command who get ground balls and pop-ups are always going to get it done.

    285. Yasmany Tomas, RF, ARI Diamondbacks 

    48/100

    Yasmany Tomas lived up to his power potential in 2016, particularly in a second half that was filled with rockets. But the other elements of his game still need work. Even with his power surge, he's still struggling to be a replacement-level player. He barely made the cut for this list.

    284. Albert Pujols, DH, Los Angeles Angels 

    48/80

    Albert Pujols is still a solid hitter who can make contact and make loud contact against mistake pitches. If you miss the days when he was so much more than that, the only guys who can help are named Doc and McFly. 

    283. Hector Neris, RP, Philadelphia Phillies 

    49/80

    Hector Neris got a lot of mileage out of his extreme splitter usage in 2016, mainly using it to miss plenty of bats. If he can one day find better command, he may also be able to miss barrels.

    282. Brandon Phillips, 2B, Cincinnati Reds 

    49/100

    It's no secret by now that Brandon Phillips is past his prime. But relative to many over-the-hill stars, he's still useful. His bat and glove both have life left.

    281. Danny Valencia, 3B, Oakland A's 

    49/100

    Danny Valencia has fallen into the background as Ryon Healy has feasted on September pitching. But Valencia has been the more productive player on the whole, particularly with his powerful bat.

    280. Adam Conley, SP, Miami Marlins 

    49/100

    There's a lot to like about Adam Conley's three-pitch mix. He has a four-seamer with a bit of rise and outstanding arm-side run as well as a changeup and a slider that both have a good deal of deception. This is where his 8.4 K/9 comes from. Now he needs a consistent release point to help him improve his ugly 4.2 BB/9 and, just as importantly, be more efficient from inning to inning.

    279. Eugenio Suarez, 3B, Cincinnati Reds 

    49/100

    Eugenio Suarez is a difficult player to analyze, but the basic breakdown goes like this: pretty good power, pretty good athleticism.

    278. Corey Dickerson, LF, Tampa Bay Rays 

    49/100

    Corey Dickerson's job is to go to the plate and crush right-handed pitching. He mostly does that, although it means living with a lot of wild swinging and limited baserunning and defensive value.

    277. Nomar Mazara, RF, Texas Rangers 

    49/100

    Nomar Mazara has some adjustments to make at the plate if he wants to get back to where he was in the first two months of 2016. But the rookie wasn't completely out of his depth and generally provided enough moments to justify the hype he arrived with.

    276. Denard Span, CF, San Francisco Giants 

    49/100

    Denard Span is not the two-way player he once was, as his age and injuries have hurt his speed and defense. However, he remains a good place to look for an example of an advanced hitting approach.

    275. Jason Heyward, RF, Chicago Cubs 

    49/100

    Jason Heyward is still arguably the best defensive right fielder in the game. But whereas that used to be just another tool in his belt, in 2016 it was really the only tool in his belt. Pitchers found weaknesses to exploit, and he was unable to adjust.

    274. Victor Martinez, DH, Detroit Tigers 

    49/80

    Despite some cracks appearing in his game, Victor Martinez is healthy and mostly back to hitting the way we know he can hit. He's not a great player, but he's certainly a great hitter.

    273. Derek Law, RP, San Francisco Giants 

    50/80

    Derek Law may have succeeded in part due to an incomplete scouting book on him. However, his funky delivery and diverse repertoire won't make that scouting book easy to write.

    272. Jordan Zimmermann, SP, Detroit Tigers 

    50/100

    Even Jordan Zimmermann's 2.0 BB/9 doesn't do his control justice. Beyond simply being good at throwing strikes, the way in which he changes eye levels with high fastballs and low secondaries makes him tough to square up. However, his velocity decline isn't helping him there or, as evidenced by his 5.7 K/9, in the whiffability department. And that's just when he's even been able to take the hill.

    271. Mark Reynolds, 1B, Colorado Rockies 

    50/100

    The disappearance of Mark Reynolds' power leaves him without any standout tools. But with a better approach at the plate, he's a more well-rounded player than he used to be.

    270. Jordy Mercer, SS, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    50/100

    Jordy Mercer might as well be called "Anonymous Shortstop No. 10." But just because he's not a star doesn't mean he's not useful. He has a solid bat and can make the routine plays on defense.

    269. Adeiny Hechavarria, SS, Miami Marlins 

    50/100

    Adeiny Hechavarria's main draw is still a glove that makes him one of the best defensive shortstops in the league. But even a bat that's arguably undersold by its surface numbers still isn't very good.

    268. David Dahl, LF, Colorado Rockies 

    50/100

    David Dahl is only a small-sample-size hero, which is why his score isn't higher. All the same, he showed some good potential in all phases of the game, particularly in his ability to barrel the ball to all fields.

    267. Travis Shaw, 3B, Boston Red Sox 

    50/100

    There was a point when Travis Shaw looked like a nice find for the Red Sox. He's since been revealed for what he really is: a player who's serviceable on both sides of the ball but not special on either side.

    266. Chase Utley, 2B, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    50/100

    Chase Utley is getting close to the end of what could be a Hall of Fame career. It's not as pretty as the beginning, but the fact he's still useful on both sides of the ball is extraordinary.

    265. Kyle Barraclough, RP, Miami Marlins 

    51/80

    There's no ignoring how big a problem Kyle Barraclough has with walks. But with stuff that's good for missing both bats and barrels, he had what he needed to downplay that problem.

    264. Martin Perez, SP, Texas Rangers

    51/100

    Martin Perez's whole approach is to attack hitters with a variety of moving pitches at and below the knees. When it's working, he gets ground balls (52.9 ground-ball percentage), and the Rangers go home happy. But it also means living with a few walks (3.5 BB/9) and virtually no strikeouts. Perez's 4.7 K/9 is the lowest among all qualified starters, and it means he needs a lot of help from his defense.

    263. Yordano Ventura, SP, Kansas City Royals 

    51/100

    Yordano Ventura still has a live arm, averaging 96.0 mph on his heat. And with a 50.7 GB%, he's still benefiting from keeping the ball down. But there's bad news there too. He hasn't been keeping his off-speed pitches down enough, which is costing him in whiffs and loud contact. It's thus the same old story with Ventura: He has worlds of potential, but he still needs to fine-tune his craft.

    262. Max Kepler, RF, Minnesota Twins 

    51/100

    Max Kepler had a run this year when he looked like a breakout star. That misrepresented him somewhat, but his bat, legs and glove all offer things to be optimistic about.

    261. Lonnie Chisenhall, RF, Cleveland Indians 

    51/100

    Among the many platoon players at the corner outfield spots, Lonnie Chisenhall is one of the better ones. He doesn't excel at any one thing, but his bat, baserunning and glove are all solid.

    260. Randal Grichuk, CF, St. Louis Cardinals 

    51/100

    It's a lot of fun to watch Randal Grichuk tee off on the ball, as he's about the perfect blend of raw power and a power swing. Now he just needs a more consistent approach and a home on defense that asks less of him than center field.

    259. Maikel Franco, 3B, Philadelphia Phillies 

    51/100

    It's clear Maikel Franco still has work to do to become a consistent hitter. But with good power and more consistent defense, he's at least earned his keep as a solid everyday option.

    258. Brad Miller, SS, Tampa Bay Rays 

    51/100

    There's no question Brad Miller has excellent power by shortstop standards. But with an inconsistent bat and a glove that's no longer playable at shortstop, it's only worth so much.

    257. Jose Iglesias, SS, Detroit Tigers 

    51/100

    After hitting over .300 in 2013 and 2015, Jose Iglesias has become what he was always supposed to be in 2016: a guy who can field the ball like crazy but who isn't actually that good at hitting it.

    256. Chris Tillman, SP, Baltimore Orioles 

    51/100

    Chris Tillman is still changing eye levels well, generally working up with his four-seamer and at and below the knees with everything else. And after losing velocity in 2014, he's gained it back and used it to boost his K/9 to 7.5. But that doesn't make him a strikeout pitcher, and Tillman's not much of a command artist or contact manager either. He gets ace billing, but he's just a reliable workhorse.

    255. Nick Markakis, RF, Atlanta Braves 

    51/100

    Nick Markakis is an unexciting player but not a bad one. His advanced approach and revived power give him a solid bat, and he still plays a serviceable right field.

    254. Nick Castellanos, 3B, Detroit Tigers 

    51/100

    Nick Castellanos' value is still limited to what he can do at the plate. He's showing signs of living up to his former hype there, particularly with a much-improved power stroke.

    253. Will Harris, RP, Houston Astros 

    52/80

    Will Harris comes from the Mark Melancon school of relief pitching: kill 'em with cutters, curveballs and good command. And he's not much worse than Melancon is at pulling it off.

    252. Ken Giles, RP, Houston Astros 

    52/100

    Ken Giles' 4.11 ERA doesn't capture how good he was after a rough first month, much less how difficult it is to make contact against him. However, any contact against him did tend to be good contact.

    251. Doug Fister, SP, Houston Astros 

    52/100

    A return to health has restored Doug Fister's velocity and spin. His return to a location pattern of putting his hard stuff higher and his slow stuff lower has allowed him to do a good job of missing barrels with a 87.9 mph exit velocity. He's still a shell of his old self, though. Though improved, his 5.7 K/9 reflects how his stuff is far from vintage. His control also isn't as sharp as it once was.

250-201: Jankowski-Davis

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    250. Travis Jankowski, CF, San Diego Padres 

    52/100

    The speed elements of Travis Jankowski's game are A-OK. He's an excellent baserunner and a quality defender. But with no power, he needs to cut down on his strikeouts to make his hitting worthwhile.

    249. Justin Bour, 1B, Miami Marlins 

    52/100

    Justin Bour's low score is reflective of how much time he's missed. But make no mistake: When he has been on the field, he's been a legit offensive threat.

    248. Mitch Moreland, 1B, Texas Rangers 

    52/100

    The Rangers know what they're going to get from Mitch Moreland every year: pretty good power and solid defense but not much else.

    247. Chase Headley, 3B, New York Yankees 

    52/100

    Headley's mediocre hitting makes him easy to overlook at a position populated with heavy hitters. But he's one of the better ones at fielding his position and running the bases.

    246. Josh Harrison, 2B, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    52/100

    Josh Harrison isn't the big star he pretended to be in 2014, particularly on the offensive side of things. However, his legs and his glove are still assets.

    245. Jason Hammel, SP, Chicago Cubs 

    52/100

    It's a nice change of pace that Jason Hammel has stayed fresh for a whole season. Thank you, potato chips. He's also maintained good control for a guy who pitches off his slider, posting a 2.9 BB/9 and keeping everything low. However, his 7.8 K/9 is a big downturn from 2015. And because he can't fool hitters in the zone, he can't avoid high exit velocity (90.8 mph).

    244. Danny Salazar, SP, Cleveland Indians 

    52/100

    You can't doubt the quality of Danny Salazar's stuff. He works in the 94-95 mph range with his fastball and finishes hitters off with one of the top swing-and-miss changeups in the business. Thus, his studly 10.6 K/9. Now he just needs three things: better control, an ability to avoid loud contact and, last but not least, good health.

    243. Felix Hernandez, SP, Seattle Mariners 

    52/100

    Felix Hernandez used to combine great stuff with great control. But now his stuff is losing velocity. His 3.9 BB/9 reflects how his control is going too. His arm slot is trending down, and his whole style now involves putting the ball below the knees and hoping hitters chase. The one area where this is still working is his hittability. He's maintaining a 50.7 GB% and a solid exit velocity at 88.9 mph.

    242. David Ross, C, Chicago Cubs 

    53/100

    David Ross among the game's best catchers? That's partially because it's been a lean year at the position. It's also because he's hit well and has continued to be a strong defensive presence.

    241. Tom Koehler, SP, Miami Marlins

    53/100

    Tom Koehler no longer pitches off his four-seam fastball. His slider, curveball and changeup account for the bulk of his pitches. That has allowed for more swinging strikes and softer contact. But as his 4.0 BB/9 serves to remind, it's hard for anyone not named Bronson Arroyo to control a secondaries-first approach. He also doesn't miss enough bats or barrels to excel away from Marlins Park.

    240. Melvin Upton Jr., Toronto Blue Jays 

    53/100

    Melvin Upton's bat didn't get any more consistent in 2016 and indeed got even worse after he was shipped from San Diego to Toronto. However, power, speed and defense are good ways to save face.

    239. Jason Castro, C, Houston Astros 

    53/100

    Jason Castro's offensive game has been a quagmire that too many whiffs and not enough power have brought down. However, he remains an asset because of how many strikes he earns his pitchers.

    238. Jameson Taillon, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    53/100

    Jameson Taillon hasn't needed to pitch a ton of innings to make an impact in his rookie season. His 1.3 BB/9 reflects excellent control that comes from a consistent arm slot and ownage of the arm-side edge of the zone with his hard stuff. And apart from his four-seamer, everything he throws has proved effective at getting ground balls. In time, he should improve on his modest 7.4 K/9.

    237. James Paxton, SP, Seattle Mariners 

    53/100

    lower arm slot unleashed James Paxton's full velocity potential and gave him greater consistency within the strike zone. From this, he benefited with a rock-solid 4.7 K/BB ratio in 19 starts. Good health continues to come and go for him, however. And despite his uptick in stuff, he's continued to struggle with hard contact. Batters hit the ball at an average of 91.0 mph off him.

    236. Joe Ross, SP, Washington Nationals 

    53/100

    Joe Ross was doing fine before he was waylaid by a bad right shoulder. Not great but fine. Like his older brother, Tyson, he works off a sinker-slider combination with enough location and movement to post a solid 7.8 K/9 and keep hard contact at bay. Now all Ross needs to do is work on getting his sinker lower in the zone, and better things may be in store.

    235. Starlin Castro, 2B, New York Yankees

    53/100

    It's high time everyone gave up on Starlin Castro once again being the rising star he was earlier in his career. But at least he can play second base without embarrassing himself—and with some pop on the side.

    234. Angel Pagan, LF, San Francisco Giants 

    53/100

    Angel Pagan didn't have his best season in 2016. But with a good bat, glove and baserunning, he put a rough 2015 season behind him.

    233. Cameron Maybin, CF, Detroit Tigers 

    53/100

    Keep in mind that Cameron Maybin's score is low partially because he just hasn't played that much in 2016. He's mostly been good when he has, showing off a particularly impressive approach at the dish.

    232. Andrew McCutchen, CF, PIT Pirates 

    53/100

    This has been the worst season of Andrew McCutchen's career, and it may have lingering effects. The Pittsburgh Pirates need to have a serious talk about removing him from center field. However, it's saying something that he's still a quality hitter even in a down year.

    231. Dan Otero, RP, Cleveland Indians 

    54/80

    Dan Otero isn't an exciting reliever due to his lack of exciting stuff. But there's no denying his effectiveness. He comes in and throws strikes and stifles loud contact, leading to a well-deserved 1.53 ERA.

    230. Alex Colome, RP, Tampa Bay Rays 

    54/80

    Hittability issues aside, Alex Colome's command and nasty cutter make him one of the more unheralded relievers in the business.

    229. Brad Brach, RP, Baltimore Orioles 

    54/80

    Brad Brach's stuff and funky delivery always gave him a good reliever profile. Turns out all he needed was some command. Rough second half aside, he did become a better pitcher in 2016.

    228. Addison Reed, RP, New York Mets 

    54/80

    Addison Reed has adjusted his mechanics and found new life as a premiere strike-thrower who, while not quite as untouchable as his 1.97 ERA suggests, certainly wasn't easy to hit.

    227. Chris Herrmann, C, ARI Diamondbacks 

    54/100

    Chris Herrmann's small sample size of playing action required that his scores be suppressed. But with a good bat and defensive versatility on display, there's no question he was useful when on the field. 

    226. Michael Wacha, SP, St. Louis Cardinals 

    54/100

    Michael Wacha remains reasonably good at keeping the ball down. He also still rocks a bread-and-butter changeup that gets him whiffs and ground balls. It's not enough for him to excel at either, however, as he managed just a 7.4 K/9 and 47.0 GB% before getting injured and moving to the bullpen. He mainly gets hurt on his fastball, which too often strays down the middle

    225. Trevor Bauer, SP, Cleveland Indians 

    54/100

    Trevor Bauer has embraced the sheer electricity of his arsenal, downplaying his four-seamer in favor of more movement. That's helped him become a ground-ball pitcher with a 48.3 GB%. But he otherwise remains a frustrating pitcher, still unable to avoid walks (3.3 BB/9) and now not missing as many bats (7.8 K/9). Maybe next year will finally be the year he puts it all together.   

    224. Tyler Naquin, CF, Cleveland Indians 

    54/100

    Tyler Naquin has been limited to part-time hero status by his platoon role against right-handed pitching. But he's certainly made the most of it, especially in showing off a surprisingly productive power stroke.

    223. Josh Reddick, RF, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    54/100

    The big knock against Josh Reddick is that he's only a platoon hitter. But it's to his credit that he's turned himself into a quality platoon hitter in the last two seasons. And he can still catch it in right field.

    222. Gio Gonzalez, SP, Washington Nationals 

    54/100

    It's to Gio Gonzalez's credit that he hasn't paid a more dire price for such a substantial velocity decline. That speaks to how he still has two good secondaries in his curveball and changeup and to how he's showing solid control for the first time in his career. He nonetheless remains a diminished version of his vintage self: still not very efficient and more hittable in every way.

    221. Vince Velasquez, SP, Philadelphia Phillies 

    54/100

    Vince Velasquez was having a rough second half before the Phillies shut him down. He certainly has things he can improve on. Chief among them would be his control, as his style consists of challenging hitters and not much else. You can say this, though: It's no small feat that each of his five pitches posted double-digit whiff rates. That's a live arm, and its 10.4 K/9 may be just the beginning.

    220. Matt Moore, SP, San Francisco Giants 

    54/100

    Matt Moore is healthy for the first time since 2013, and he has better control (3.3 BB/9) now than he did then. Throw in good velocity with 92-93 mph heat and a sharp curveball, and you get a typical power left-hander. But the big disappointment of Moore's career continues to be his inability to miss as many bats (8.1 K/9) as he should. He's also nothing special at missing barrels.

    219. Matt Bush, RP, Texas Rangers 

    55/80

    A life as a dominant reliever isn't what Matt Bush had in mind when he was a young shortstop who went No. 1 overall in the 2004 draft. But after all he's been through, that he has a major league career at all is something he's no doubt thankful for.

    218. Pedro Strop, RP, Chicago Cubs 

    55/80

    He's the less heralded part of the trade that brought Jake Arrieta to Chicago, but Pedro Strop continues to be a dominant reliever for the Cubs. All it's required is better control of his excellent fastball-slider combo.

    217. Nate Jones, RP, Chicago White Sox 

    55/80

    That we're singing Nate Jones' praises at all is a cool story after Tommy John surgery sidelined him for most of 2014 and 2015. He reminded us what he can do with his strong command and power stuff.

    216. Steve Pearce, 1B, Baltimore Orioles 

    55/100

    Disappointing finish notwithstanding, Steve Pearce recaptured some of the magic of his big 2014 breakout in 2016 by hammering left-handers and playing versatile defense.

    215. Anthony DeSclafani, SP, Cincinnati Reds 

    55/100

    Anthony DeSclafani has been a quiet (albeit limited) success story with a 3.38 ERA in 19 starts. He's never struggled to control the ball, but he's trying a new trick this year by working lower with his secondaries. That's had a hand in him becoming a better strikeout pitcher with a 7.8 K/9. The catch is that his hittability has gone backward, with both his GB% and exit velocity taking hits.

    214. Sean Rodriguez, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    55/100

    Sean Rodriguez is probably best known for that time he punched out a water cooler. Now meet a guy who can hit a bit in addition to playing all over the field.

    213. Brandon Moss, 1B, St. Louis Cardinals 

    55/100

    Brandon Moss' value revolves almost entirely around how much power he can provide, so hats off to him for maximizing it by adding more loft to go with his raw pop.

    212. Francisco Cervelli, C, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    55/100

    Francisco Cervelli hasn't recaptured the magic of his big breakout in 2015. But with an advanced bat and an elite framing skill, he's still been useful.

    211. Jayson Werth, LF, Washington Nationals 

    55/100

    Good health allowed Jayson Werth to make a strong recovery from a rough 2015 season, specifically in his ability to punish the baseball. Which is good, because he needs to hit to downplay his bad defense.

    210. Michael Saunders, LF, Toronto Blue Jays 

    55/100

    Michael Saunders had a rough second half after an All-Star first half. But what happened in that first half still counts and was good enough to cement Saunders as one of 2016's better left fielders.

    209. Junior Guerra, SP, Milwaukee Brewers 

    55/100

    Don't read too much into Junior Guerra's 2.81 ERA. The aged rookie owes that to how well he's kept the ball in the yard (0.7 HR/9) with a little help from the BABIP gods (.250), and he hasn't earned either with what's actually pedestrian contact management. Nonetheless, he has shown solid control (3.2 BB/9) of a pretty good arsenal and has been good for six innings every time out.

    208. Carlos Beltran, RF, Texas Rangers 

    55/100

    While Carlos Beltran's legs and glove have aged like milk, his bat has aged like fine wine. He still knows what he's doing when he steps in the box, and his power remains a threat.

    207. Kelvin Herrera, RP, Kansas City Royals 

    56/80

    Kelvin Herrera still has the lethal power stuff you want a late-inning reliever to have. The difference this year was that he threw more strikes, allowing him to get even better as a strikeout artist.

    206. Freddy Galvis, SS, Philadelphia Phillies 

    56/100

    Anybody could have predicted Freddy Galvis getting it done on defense this season. It's the power that's been a pleasant surprise, and it's helped make up for a bat that's not at all built for consistency.

    205. Cesar Hernandez, 2B, PHI Phillies 

    56/100

    The Philadelphia Phillies did the right thing when they moved Cesar Hernandez to leadoff in July. His bat profiles well at that spot. Now all he needs are some other defining qualities.

    204. Stephen Vogt, C, Oakland A's 

    56/100

    Stephen Vogt's All-Star form from early 2015 is long gone. However, he's still a dependable presence behind the dish and a solid hitter in the box.

    203. Ryan Schimpf, 2B, San Diego Padres 

    56/100

    As a 28-year-old rookie, it's fair to call Ryan Schimpf a late bloomer. The fact we're talking about him at all is something, and he mainly owes that to his emergence as a lethal power threat.

    202. Marcus Semien, SS, Oakland A's

    56/100

    Marcus Semien's defense remains a major drain on his overall value, but his excellent power (by shortstop standards) goes a long way toward making up for that.

    201. Rajai Davis, CF, Cleveland Indians 

    56/100

    Rajai Davis' baserunning alone makes him worth playing, but he's useful in other ways too. He's not a bad hitter, power hitter or defender.

200-151: Martin-Samardzija

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    200. Leonys Martin, CF, Seattle Mariners 

    56/100

    Leonys Martin has tried to add some more power to his game in 2016, but he's mostly the same player he's always been: a good defender with an inconsistent bat.

    199. Chris Carter, 1B, Milwaukee Brewers 

    56/100

    Chris Carter still swings and misses too much and doesn't bring a lot to the table when he's not at the plate. But if anyone wants humongous power, he's your huckleberry.

    198. Melky Cabrera, LF, Chicago White Sox 

    56/100

    Melky Cabrera is a quality hitter who makes plenty of contact and sprays line drives all over. That's about the extent of his value, but it's enough to make him one of the better everyday left fielders in the league.

    197. Hunter Pence, RF, San Francisco Giants 

    56/100

    Hunter Pence looks like he's past both his physical and productive prime. But when he's able to stay on the field, he still provides good offense and mostly good defense.

    196. Jose Bautista, RF, Toronto Blue Jays 

    56/100

    With his excellent eye and outstanding raw power, Jose Bautista remains a dangerous hitter. But injuries held him back this season, and these days he's just not the good all-around player he's used to being.

    195. Ivan Nova, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    57/100

    Pittsburgh Pirates pitching coach Ray Searage has salvaged something from Ivan Nova's season. His sinker and curveball combination have always made him a good ground ball pitcher. So it goes with a 53.0 GB%, helping to make up for otherwise loud contact. As Jeff Sullivan covered at FanGraphs, all Searage has done is make Nova throw more strikes. That's a good way to improve a pitcher.

    194. Cameron Rupp, C, Philadelphia Phillies

    57/100

    Cameron Rupp was toying with a bigger breakout earlier in the year. That didn't pan out, but the Phillies should gladly take a solid hitting catcher who can hold his own on defense.

    193. Mark Melancon, RP, WAS Nationals 

    57/80

    Mark Melancon isn't overpowering, but he's awfully deceptive with an arsenal that earns him enough whiffs and more than enough quiet contact.

    192. Paulo Orlando, OF, Kansas City Royals 

    57/100

    Paulo Orlando doesn't get on base or hit for power. But with his ability to hit for average, run the bases and play defense, he more than makes up for that.

    191. Yangervis Solarte, 3B, San Diego Padres 

    57/100

    This former Yankee is a member of the "Better Than You Think" club. Yangervis Solarte's nothing special when he's not in the box, but he packs a surprisingly potent bat when he is.

    190. Carlos Rodon, SP, Chicago White Sox 

    57/100

    wrist injury got in his way, but 2016 has otherwise been a step forward for Carlos Rodon. His 2.9 BB/9 is a massive improvement over last year's 4.6. That's a combination of him going over the top and downplaying his slider. He's had to sacrifice some whiffs to make it work, but his 8.9 K/9 proves his stuff is good no matter what. Keep an eye on this guy.

    189. Yu Darvish, SP, Texas Rangers 

    57/100

    It's like Yu Darvish was never gone. His year off recovering from Tommy John surgery hasn't stopped his improving control (2.9 BB/9) or his extreme ability to strike hitters out (11.5 K/9). He's actually come back with better stuff, showing more velocity and earning double-digit whiff rates on his slider, curveball and cutter. To boot, all this stuff is tough to square up for exit velocity. Welcome back.

    188. Gerrit Cole, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    57/100

    Injuries have kept Gerrit Cole off the mound and have made it difficult for him to find a consistent release point. On the plus side, his stuff remained overpowering. He averaged 95.2 mph on his heat and maintained good action on his secondaries. This didn't buy him many whiffs. But with a 45.6 GB%, a 11.7 infield fly-ball percentage and 88.5 mph in batted ball velocity, he remained tough to square up.

    187. J.J. Hardy, SS, Baltimore Orioles 

    57/100

    Injury aside, J.J. Hardy has bounced back nicely from a rough 2015. In addition to his usual good defense, he's provided some more pop at the plate.

    186. Joe Panik, 2B, San Francisco Giants 

    57/100

    Injuries have done Joe Panik no favors this season, particularly at the plate. He remains an advanced hitter, however, with decent power and underrated baserunning and defensive talents.

    185. Jonathan Schoop, 2B, Baltimore Orioles 

    57/100

    Jonathan Schoop's profile remains the same as always: It can be painful to watch him hit, but he's got serious pop and is surprisingly well-rounded.

    184. Alex Gordon, LF, Kansas City Royals 

    57/100

    This will not go into the books as Alex Gordon's finest season, but all he's become is a lesser version of a once-great player. He's still a quality hitter, baserunner and fielder.

    183. Marcell Ozuna, CF, Miami Marlins 

    57/100

    Marcell Ozuna's first-half revival has also been his downfall in the second half. The one standout skill he has is his power. Ever since pitchers adjusted to it, he's looked awfully human.

    182. Eric Hosmer, 1B, Kansas City Royals 

    57/100

    Eric Hosmer hasn't had a bad season, but it's been frustrating. The increased power is nice, but it's a big price to pay for regression in every other department.

    181. Adrian Gonzalez, 1B, LA Dodgers 

    57/100

    A creaky back hasn't made Adrian Gonzalez's life easy in 2016, but he's done a solid job of turning things around with better contact while continuing to be a reliable defender at first base.

    180. Roberto Osuna, RP, Toronto Blue Jays 

    58/80

    Roberto Osuna built on his breakthrough 2015 season in 2016, establishing better control and missing more bats. He doesn't get enough credit for being one of the best relief aces in the sport.

    179. Seung Hwan Oh, RP, St. Louis Cardinals 

    58/80

    "The Final Boss," indeed. Seung Hwan Oh may not light up radar guns, but he throws strikes and misses a ton of bats with his mix of good stuff and deception.

    178. Jerad Eickhoff, SP, Philadelphia Phillies 

    58/100

    With just a 1.9 BB/9, Jerad Eickhoff has displayed impressive control for a guy who barely throws 50 percent fastballs. It's largely because of that he's been the rock in the Philadelphia Phillies rotation, averaging six innings per start. But for a guy who throws so many breaking balls, he's surprisingly hittable. A 7.5 K/9 is nothing special, and a 1.4 HR/9 is painful.

    177. Kendall Graveman, SP, Oakland A's 

    58/100

    Kendall Graveman is a sinkerballer who pitches exactly like you expect a sinkerballer to pitch. He does a heck of a job working hitters at the knees, limiting walks (2.3 BB/9) and racking up plenty of ground balls (52.2 GB%). But only Martin Perez has a lower K/9 than Graveman's 5.1, and all his ground balls don't prevent him from serving up iffy exit velocity at 89.8 mph.

    176. Ian Kennedy, SP, Kansas City Royals 

    58/100

    Ian Kennedy loves to go right at hitters with his fastball, and it's very much a reason why he's once again missing bats with an 8.7 K/9. It's getting harder to hit every year. But he still doesn't limit walks (3.1 BB/9) or command the ball that well for a guy who loves his fastball so much. And when he doesn't miss bats, he gets hit very hard. Case in point: a 1.5 HR/9 and 89.9 mph exit velocity.

    175. Jarrod Dyson, CF, Kansas City Royals 

    58/100

    Jarrod Dyson is a part-time player who might be the least powerful hitter in baseball. But with a good on-base talent, tons of speed and a brilliant glove, he more than makes up for these faults.

    174. Wade Davis, RP, Kansas City Royals 

    58/80

    Wade Davis wasn't as absurdly dominant in 2016 as he was in 2014 and 2015, in part thanks to issues with his control. But he was still throwing pitches that look like special effects, and they still worked.

    173. Danny Espinosa, SS, WAS Nationals 

    58/100

    Danny Espinosa is a good argument against the idea of using batting average alone to judge hitters. Between his power, baserunning and defense, he has value beyond his poor average.

    172. Gary Sanchez, C, New York Yankees 

    58/100

    Has Gary Sanchez overachieved in his big breakthrough? That should be obvious, yes. But has he shown talents worth getting excited about? Also yes.

    171. Welington Castillo, C, ARI Diamondbacks 

    58/100

    Welington Castillo has come back down to earth after an explosive revival in 2015, but he remains a solid offensive weapon by catcher standards.

    170. Didi Gregorius, SS, New York Yankees 

    58/100

    Didi Gregorius had been a player with solid tools in search of a defining feature in his first couple of years. He's finally found one in his increased power.

    169. Robbie Ray, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks 

    58/100

    Robbie Ray has some under-the-radar stuff. His four-seamer and sinker have good velocity and good action, and his slider is quietly among the best at missing bats. That's where his sparkling 11.4 K/9 comes from. Ray just doesn't offer much else, as he's not efficient and is largely incapable of beating right-handed batters within the zone. Hence a platoon split that can't be ignored.

    168. Jake Odorizzi, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    58/100

    Perhaps more than any other pitcher, Jake Odorizzi makes his way by changing eye levels. His 2.7 BB/9 and 7.8 K/9 are testament to how well he executes it, as he's consistent and frequently able to fool batters. But when they're not fooled, balls go far. He's served up 1.4 homers per nine innings and 90.4 mph in exit velocity. That's made him prone to short outings.

    167. Jedd Gyorko, 2B, St. Louis Cardinals 

    58/100

    It's happened under the radar, but 2016 has arguably been Jedd Gyorko's best season. He's not the most well-rounded player, but power and reliable defense come in handy.

    166. Devon Travis, 2B, Toronto Blue Jays 

    58/100

    We've yet to see Devon Travis over a whole season, but he's given us a good idea of what it would look like. Although none of his tools are great, they're all good.

    165. Luke Gregerson, RP, Houston Astros 

    59/80

    Luke Gregerson has quietly been one of the best relievers in baseball for a while now. So it went in 2016, as he was still throwing strikes, missing bats and getting lots of ground balls.

    164. Edwin Diaz, RP, Seattle Mariners 

    59/80

    Edwin Diaz isn't a flawless reliever. But with a big fastball and an even bigger slider, he fills the most basic job description of a shutdown reliever: strike hitters out.

    163. Brian McCann, C, New York Yankees 

    59/100

    Everyone is freaking out over Sanchez, and for good reasons. But also give Brian McCann credit for continuing to pack a solid bat and undervalued defensive skills.

    162. Zack Cozart, SS, Cincinnati Reds 

    59/100

    Zack Cozart is still the reliable defensive shortstop he's always been. The real key has been him adding more offense to his game simply by making better contact.

    161. Brett Gardner, LF, New York Yankees 

    59/100

    The power that Brett Gardner found in 2014 and 2015 disappeared in 2016, but he was still a tough out who continued to provide good value on the basepaths and on defense.

    160. Marco Estrada, SP, Toronto Blue Jays 

    59/100

    Marco Estrada has a four-seamer that rises and a changeup that seems to stop in mid-air. He's been putting his changeup lower in 2016 and baiting hitters with fastballs at the belt. He gets a lot of easy outs from this style, collecting an 8.5 K/9 and a 16.4 IFFB%. Disciplined hitters can coax him for walks (3.3 BB/9), though, and any batted ball that's not a pop-up is usually trouble.

    159. Kevin Pillar, CF, Toronto Blue Jays 

    59/100

    The strides Kevin Pillar made as an offensive player in 2015 have been erased in 2016, both at the plate and on the basepaths. On the bright side, he remains one of the best defensive center fielders in the league.

    158. Jose Abreu, 1B, Chicago White Sox 

    59/100

    Jose Abreu is not the thunderous offensive force that he was when he first arrived in 2014. But thanks to his second-half surge, he's shown he still has one of the more dangerous bats at the position.

    157. Javier Baez, 2B, Chicago Cubs 

    59/100

    Javier Baez still has holes in his swing to patch before he can live up to his superstar potential. But for now, he's turned out to be a useful utility guy.

    156. Justin Upton, LF, Detroit Tigers 

    59/100

    Justin Upton was much-maligned for most of his first season with the Detroit Tigers, and for good reason. But his bat came alive in the second half and proved that, if nothing else, he still packs a wallop.

    155. Adam Jones, CF, Baltimore Orioles 

    59/100

    Adam Jones has a unique skill set that makes him a tough guy to analyze by traditional center field standards. But what we know in 2016 is this: He's still a wild swinger, there are more cracks in his power than his 28 homers let on and his defensive reputation doesn't quite align with reality.

    154. Jeurys Familia, RP, New York Mets 

    60/80

    Jeurys Familia might have the nastiest arsenal of pitches of any reliever, and it serves him well missing both bats and barrels. Heaven forbid he ever start throwing strikes more consistently.

    153. CC Sabathia, SP, New York Yankees 

    60/100

    CC Sabathia showed up to 2016 healthy and with a new pitch selection. He's ditched his four-seamer and added a cutter, ensuring everything he throws moves. This has made it easier for him to miss barrels, as his average of 85.4 mph puts him among baseball's exit-velocity leaders. But with more movement comes less control. And with his velocity still long gone, missing bats remains a struggle.

    152. Zach Davies, SP, Milwaukee Brewers 

    60/100

    Zach Davies' lilliputian stature (6'0", 155 lbs) doesn't make it easy for him to log high pitch counts or innings totals. And with velocity that sits in the 89-90 mph range, he's not overpowering anyone. But he sure does keep the ball low, limiting walks (2.1 BB/9) and racking up quiet contact. He's quietly been one of the more interesting success stories of 2016.

    151. Jeff Samardzija, SP, SF Giants 

    60/100

    With just a 7.1 K/9, Jeff Samardzija's strikeout rate still isn't what it used to be. Still, being able to throw seven different pitches for strikes at least allows him to give batters plenty of different looks. If nothing else, it's helping him maintain respectable exit velocity at 89.3 mph. And at the end of the day, the guy's a lock for six innings. Good or bad, that's worth something.

150-101: Wainwright-Fowler

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    150. Adam Wainwright, SP, St. Louis Cardinals 

    60/100

    Don't read too much into Adam Wainwright's 4.67 ERA. He still does many things well, including control (2.6 BB/9) and missing barrels (87.3 mph exit velocity). He's also still a workhorse. But with his arm slot dropping more and more, his command is becoming less precise. Meanwhile, his curveball isn't the swing-and-miss pitch it used to be. 

    149. Sandy Leon, C, Boston Red Sox 

    60/100

    Sandy Leon's rise to stardom is the kind that justifiably raises eyebrows. But with an offensive surge brought on by improved contact, it passes the smell test surprisingly well.

    148. Willson Contreras, C, Chicago Cubs 

    60/100

    Willson Contreras isn't perfect, but the good outweighs the bad. With a good approach, good power, good athleticism and a well-rounded defensive game, he has a bright present and an even brighter future.

    147. Bartolo Colon, SP, New York Mets 

    60/100

    Bartolo Colon is still around and still doing his thing: throwing 90 percent fastballs and assaulting the strike zone with them. The idea is to limit walks and use different movements to avoid barrels. He's not great at the latter, but his 1.5 BB/9 is proof of how good he is at the former. His big weakness is what's inevitable when a pitcher pumps 80-something heaters into the zone over and over: no whiffs.

    146. Eduardo Nunez, 3B, SF Giants 

    60/100

    With consistent playing time, Eduardo Nunez has found better contact and been able to show off his speed more often. The next challenge for him to conquer is consistent defense.

    145. Lorenzo Cain, CF, Kansas City Royals 

    60/100

    Lorenzo Cain's score here is hurt by his injury as well as some downturns in his performance. On the whole, though, he's still a good player who packs a quality bat and is productive on the bases and in the field.

    144. Martin Prado, 3B, Miami Marlins 

    60/100

    Martin Prado doesn't come with much power, but he's one of the game's most advanced hitters, and he still holds his own on the bases and on defense.

    143. Giancarlo Stanton, RF, Miami Marlins 

    60/100

    Giancarlo Stanton is a superstar player, but he didn't have a superstar-level season in 2016. His power and defense remained in fine shape. What he was missing are the other things that have made him so good: a steady on-base habit and underrated baserunning.

    142. Hisashi Iwakuma, SP, Seattle Mariners 

    61/100

    The Seattle Mariners can still count on two things when Hisashi Iwakuma takes the ball: excellent command (2.1 BB/9) that keeps his pitch count low and provides at least six good innings as a result. But he was a more effective pitcher when his splitter was a larger part of his arsenal. Downplaying it has cost him ground balls (40.8 GB%) and strikeouts (6.5 K/9).

    141. Neil Walker, 2B, New York Mets 

    61/100

    Neil Walker's big redeeming quality remained the same as it ever was: His bat is good for both consistency and power.

    140. Joe Mauer, 1B, Minnesota Twins 

    61/100

    Without power and a steady role behind the dish, two things that once inflated Joe Mauer's value are gone forever. But it is nice to see him hitting and getting more comfortable at first base.

    139. Asdrubal Cabrera, SS, New York Mets 

    61/100

    Asdrubal Cabrera is a lesser athlete than he used to be, which limits him on the bases and on defense. But he's once again packing a potent bat that specializes in loud contact.

    138. Andrelton Simmons, SS, LA Angels 

    61/100

    Andrelton Simmons remains arguably the best defensive shortstop in the entire league. The difference this year is that he's also found ways to be more consistent at the plate.

    137. Mark Trumbo, RF, Baltimore Orioles 

    61/100

    This is a low score for MLB's leading home run hitter. But strip away Mark Trumbo's power, and there's not much left. He's not a consistent hitter, and he's a non-factor on the bases and on defense.

    136. Curtis Granderson, RF, New York Mets 

    61/100

    Curtis Granderson's game still mostly boils down to two things: get on base and hit home runs. Fortunately, he still does both things quite well while also providing some value with his legs.

    135. Dallas Keuchel, SP, Houston Astros 

    62/100

    How do you go from a Cy Young winner to a 4.55 ERA? Stuff and command struggles will do the trick. Dallas Keuchel lost velocity in 2016. He also didn't make hitters go get his pitches, throwing more sinkers inside the strike zone rather than just outside the zone. But with a strong 56.7 GB%, a decent 3.0 K/BB ratio and 168 innings, Keuchel also didn't crumble as much as his ERA suggests.

    134. Steven Wright, SP, Boston Red Sox 

    62/100

    Steven Wright's knuckleball has given us some of the best GIFs of the season, and they also earned him a decent 7.3 K/9 and even better 87.4 mph exit velocity. He's missed fewer bats than anyone in the zone and earned more contact than anyone outside the zone. Too bad his big breakout had to be ruined by a bum shoulder and a generally lousy second half.

    133. Marcus Stroman, SP, Toronto Blue Jays 

    62/100

    Marcus Stroman's 4.34 ERA exaggerates how bad he's been in 2016. He's delivered in his promise on some fronts, showing strong command of a deep arsenal that's allowed for a solid 3.1 K/BB ratio and MLB-best 60.5 GB%. But doing nothing but keeping the ball down has made him predictable. Despite his tendency for ground balls, the price he's paid for that has been 91.2 mph exit velocity.

    132. Elvis Andrus, SS, Texas Rangers 

    62/100

    At his peak, Elvis Andrus was a consistent hitter who could wreak havoc on the bases and play a mean shortstop. Now he's pretty much just a consistent hitter, but that's still a lot better than nothing.

    131. Rougned Odor, 2B, Texas Rangers 

    62/100

    Rougned Odor is a fun player to watch, as you never know when he's going to hit a ball a mile or make a dazzling play in the field. It's everything in between that he needs to get better at.

    130. Ervin Santana, SP, Minnesota Twins 

    63/100

    Ervin Santana has flown under the radar for a lousy Minnesota Twins team by being his usual self: throwing strikes, eating innings and getting just enough whiffs to make it all interesting.

    129. Drew Pomeranz, SP, Boston Red Sox 

    63/100

    Drew Pomeranz's control and workload issues prevent him from rating as a top pitcher. But he's established himself as a tough at-bat for opposing hitters, capable of missing bats and barrels with his curveball-heavy attack.

    128. Keon Broxton, CF, Milwaukee Brewers 

    63/100

    Every season brings at least one small sample-size star. Between his ability to crush everything in his sight and his ability to run wild on the basepaths and in the field, that's what Keon Broxton's been.

    127. Jake Lamb, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks 

    63/100

    Defensive issues aside, Jake Lamb has taken a step toward stardom in 2016. His bat always had potential, and it's being realized through frequent loud contact.

    126. Todd Frazier, 3B, Chicago White Sox

    63/100

    Todd Frazier just can't find the right approach at the plate. However, good power, baserunning and defense are pretty good ways to save par.

    125. Mike Napoli, 1B, Cleveland Indians 

    63/100

    Mike Napoli is having one of his good BABIP years, so his offensive success is probably a bit overstated. But only a bit. He's back at full strength, and that's restored the mighty power that he's made his name on.

    124. Adam Duvall, LF, Cincinnati Reds 

    63/100

    Adam Duvall fits the usual mold of a slugger in that he hits the ball hard but isn't consistent. The bonus with him is that he also happens to be a quality defender.

    123. Stephen Piscotty, RF, St. Louis Cardinals

    63/100

    Stephen Piscotty may not adhere to the usual blueprint of a quality hitter, but what he does works for him. He's also not to be overlooked as a defender, making him a good all-around player.

    122. J.D. Martinez, RF, Detroit Tigers 

    63/100

    This is three years in a row now that J.D. Martinez has been one of the best sluggers and most productive hitters in baseball. It's a shame that his game was otherwise one-dimensional.

    121. Salvador Perez, C, Kansas City Royals 

    63/100

    Salvador Perez packs a powerful bat and a good throwing arm, and he deserves props for being behind the plate every day. Otherwise, he's not the superstar catcher he's often portrayed as.

    120. Jung Ho Kang, 3B, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    63/100

    Jung Ho Kang looked like a great find at the plate in 2015. Now he's even better, mainly thanks to a barrel-to-ball ability that deserves more attention.

    119. Tyler Anderson, SP, Colorado Rockies 

    64/100

    The easy knock against Tyler Anderson's position as a top-40 pitcher is that he's handled a small sample size. But in this small sample size, he's showed good control and stifled hard contact while putting up a 3.54 ERA for the Colorado Rockies. The latter, in particular, is no small feat.

    118. Evan Gattis, C, Houston Astros 

    64/100

    Evan Gattis is his same ol' powerful self, except now with more patience and solid defense.

    117. Troy Tulowitzki, SS, Toronto Blue Jays 

    64/100

    Troy Tulowitzki isn't the superstar he once was. However, he still offers a thunderous bat and a reliable glove at the toughest position on the infield.

    116. John Lackey, SP, Chicago Cubs

    64/100

    John Lackey has been more prone to hard contact than he usually is, but he's otherwise featured more of the same: pretty good control, pretty good stuff and a lot of innings.

    115. Kevin Gausman, SP, Baltimore Orioles 

    64/100

    Kevin Gausman is still developing from a thrower into a pitcher. But with improving command to go with a nasty arsenal of pitches, he's not even all the way there yet, and he's already getting really good.

    114. Ian Desmond, CF, Texas Rangers 

    64/100

    Although Ian Desmond began 2016 a lot stronger than he's finishing it, it's mostly been a success with good power, good baserunning and surprisingly strong defense in the outfield.

    113. Billy Hamilton, CF, Cincinnati Reds 

    65/100

    Billy Hamilton's legs make him just the kind of weapon you'd expect him to be on the bases and in the outfield. His bat still needs a lot of work, but it's at least headed in the right direction.

    112. Jon Gray, SP, Colorado Rockies 

    65/100

    Don't put too much stock into Jon Gray's 4.54 ERA. That's actually pretty good for a Coors Field product, and it masks how he's developing into the power arm the Colorado Rockies hoped he would be.

    111. Zack Greinke, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks 

    65/100

    Zack Greinke's 4.37 ERA overstates how bad he's been. If nothing else, he remains a terrific command artist and a good workhorse. But between his diminished whiffability and hittability, he's definitely not the same pitcher he was a year ago.

    110. Chris Archer, SP, Tampa Bay Rays 

    65/100

    Even when Chris Archer was struggling in the first half, he was still among the best in the game at missing bats. Ever since he found his control in the second half, he's turned back into one of baseball's best starters, period.

    109. Julio Teheran, SP, Atlanta Braves 

    65/100

    It's been wasted on a bad Braves team, but Julio Teheran is back to looking like the promising starter who made a name for himself back in 2014. His stuff has always been good. He just needed to get his command back.

    108. Rich Hill, SP, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    65/100

    Rich Hill's health woes have undermined his season and put a dent in his score here. Make no mistake, though. When Hill has been healthy, he's been among the game's most dominant starters.

    107. Russell Martin, C, Toronto Blue Jays 

    65/100

    Russell Martin disappeared from the ranks of baseball's top catchers in the first two months of the season. But ever since then, he's continued to be a well-balanced hitter who serves his pitchers well on defense.

    106. Khris Davis, LF, Oakland A's 

    65/100

    With his power, Khris Davis isn't that dissimilar from Chris Davis. He's not a one-trick pony, though, as he also played a decent left field in 2016.

    105. Aledmys Diaz, SS, St. Louis Cardinals 

    65/100

    With poor baserunning and defense weighing him down, Aledmys Diaz's value is tied up in what he can do at the plate. And if he can do one thing, it's hit the ball hard.

    104. Ender Inciarte, CF, Atlanta Braves 

    66/100

    It's easy to miss Ender Inciarte due to his lack of superstar skills. But the dude is a quality hitter and baserunner, and he further adds to his value with excellent defense in center field.

    103. Trevor Story, SS, Colorado Rockies 

    66/100

    With a powerful bat and a surprisingly good glove, Trevor Story came out of nowhere to become one of 2016's best feel-good stories narratives.

    102. Carlos Martinez, SP, St. Louis Cardinals 

    66/100

    Carlos Martinez hasn't been as dominant as his 3.15 ERA suggests, as he's struggled with his command and ability to miss bats relative to his legitimately great 2015 showing. He still has electric stuff, though, and it continues to miss barrels.

    101. Dexter Fowler, CF, Chicago Cubs 

    66/100

    Dexter Fowler's on-base talent is a huge strength, and it comes with no real weaknesses. He has good power, good speed and a serviceable glove.

100-51: Calhoun-Rendon

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    Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

    100. Kole Calhoun, RF, Los Angeles Angels 

    66/100

    It's by design that Kole Calhoun didn't hit for as much power in 2016 as he did in 2015. But with greater consistency and a glove that remained one of the best in right field, that's an acceptable loss.

    99. Trea Turner, CF, Washington Nationals 

    67/100

    The small sample size Trea Turner has played in doesn't help his cause here. Otherwise, he's shown why he was considered one of baseball's top prospects. He has a surprising amount of pop in his bat for a speedy hitter, and his speed has indeed been as advertised.

    98. Jeremy Hellickson, SP, PHI Phillies 

    67/100

    Even I think this score overrates Jeremy Hellickson's 2016 season a little. But it goes into the books as a return to form anyway, as he's back to missing bats and, more importantly, keeping loud contact to a minimum.

    97. Yadier Molina, C, St. Louis Cardinals 

    67/100

    Maybe Yadier Molina isn't baseball's best defensive catcher anymore. But he's still a damn good one with a revitalized bat in 2016. 

    96. JT Realmuto, C, Miami Marlins 

    67/100

    Although JT Realmuto still needs to polish his defense, he's a reliable everyday catcher who can hit with the best of 'em.

    95. Carlos Santana, 1B, Cleveland Indians 

    67/100

    Carlos Santana was already one of baseball's most advanced hitters. Now he comes with more power. This calls for a guitar solo.

    94. Hanley Ramirez, 1B, Boston Red Sox

    67/100

    Hanley Ramirez has rescued himself from the ranks of baseball's worst players. He showed up in better shape and has benefited from a more measured approach without sacrificing much power.

    93. Brandon Belt, 1B, San Francisco Giants 

    67/100

    Brandon Belt's modest power numbers make him easy to overlook among his first base peers. But with a consistent bat and a really good glove, he remains an overlooked gem at first base.

    92. Logan Forsythe, 2B, Tampa Bay Rays 

    67/100

    It's easy to overlook Logan Forsythe, but at least we know now that his 2015 breakout was legit. The other parts of his game are limited, but he can hit.

    91. Carlos Gonzalez, RF, Colorado Rockies 

    67/100

    There's no getting around Carlos Gonzalez's home/road splits. But while his overall numbers are skewed by Coors Field, his bat is still dangerous and it comes with a reliable glove.

    90. J.A. Happ, SP, Toronto Blue Jays 

    67/100

    J.A. Happ's 3.20 ERA (not to mention his 20 wins) overstates how good he's been in 2016, but there's no question he's been one of the top pitchers in the league. The last couple of years have seen him establish good command and turn into a generally crafty pitcher.

    89. Aaron Sanchez, SP, Toronto Blue Jays 

    67/100

    Aaron Sanchez's breakout season has hit something of a wall in its final two months. If nothing else, that's a reminder he's not yet a complete pitcher. But if this is what he can do with some control of his electric stuff, watch out.

    88. Dellin Betances, RP, New York Yankees 

    68/80

    Dellin Betances has one of the best fastballs and one of the best curveballs and an idea of what he's doing with both. Don't read too much into his 3.08 ERA, as 2016 was another dominant season for the big right-hander.

    87. Steven Matz, SP, New York Mets

    68/100

    Injuries have once again conspired against Steven Matz in 2016. Nonetheless, it shouldn't be overlooked how well he's pitched when he's been healthy, throwing strikes and overwhelming batters with an array of quality pitches.

    86. Cole Hamels, SP, Texas Rangers 

    68/100

    Cole Hamels has come down to earth in the final weeks of 2016. That's not a fluke, as he was overachieving for much of the year. But let's be real: The guy still has good stuff and an idea of how to use it.

    85. Odubel Herrera, CF, Philadelphia Phillies 

    68/100

    Despite my minor criticisms of how Odubel Herrera is tackling his 2016 season, he remains a very good player. He's a good hitter with some power, good speed and a glove that, while not 100 percent reliable, is still an asset.

    84. Nelson Cruz, RF, Seattle Mariners 

    68/100

    It's business as usual for Nelson Cruz: His job is to hit, and he does his job by hitting the ball harder than anyone in the league. That'll do.

    83. Aroldis Chapman, RP, Chicago Cubs 

    69/80

    Aroldis Chapman is proof that throwing almost nothing but triple-digit heat is good business in the relief pitching racket—you know, just in case anyone needed further proof of that.

    82. Jonathan Villar, SS, Milwaukee Brewers 

    69/100

    Sometimes all a guy needs is a chance to play. Jonathan Villar has gotten his. And between his quality bat and amazing baserunning, he's proved to be a valuable offensive player.

    81. Ben Zobrist, 2B, Chicago Cubs 

    69/100

    We're past the point where we can bicker and argue about WAR and its opinion of Ben Zobrist as one of the best players in the game. But with an advanced bat to go with a dependable glove, he's still useful.

    80. Bryce Harper, RF, Washington Nationals 

    69/100

    Bryce Harper fell pretty far from his 2015 performance, and any investigation into why that is will turn up quite a few red flags. But we also have to be real. Harper wasn't as good, but on the whole, he remained a good on-base guy with good power, speed and defense.

    79. Joc Pederson, CF, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    69/100

    Joc Pederson was mostly just a power hitter in 2015. Now he's a power hitter who's swinging and missing less and playing more reliably on the bases and in the outfield.

    78. Xander Bogaerts, SS, Boston Red Sox 

    69/100

    Xander Bogaerts' mediocre defense is holding him back from being a superstar. But it's impossible to ignore his quality bat, and he deserves more attention for his baserunning.

    77. Michael Fulmer, SP, Detroit Tigers 

    69/100

    Michael Fulmer's Rookie of the Year charge has slowed down in the last month or so, allowing all the talk about Gary Sanchez to heat up. Fulmer is a legit candidate, however, as he's overwhelmed hitters with his stuff and his command of it.

    76. Danny Duffy, SP, Kansas City Royals 

    70/100

    Simply remaining healthy in 2016 has been an accomplishment for Danny Duffy. Meanwhile, he's also shown what he can do when given a chance to air out his high-octane stuff. He's not impossible to square up, but the hard part is hitting him, period.

    75. Carlos Carrasco, SP, Cleveland Indians 

    70/100

    Carlos Carrasco's hard contact problem and injury proneness hold him back from being truly elite. But anyone who can throw strikes with his kind of stuff is always going to be a tough guy to face.

    74. Gregory Polanco, RF, Pittsburgh Pirates 

    70/100

    Gregory Polanco just keeps getting better. Now that he has some power to go with his consistency at the plate, he's one of the most well-rounded right fielders in the sport.

    73. Yasmani Grandal, C, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    70/100

    Yasmani Grandal is one of the most underappreciated players in the majors. A great eye and lots of power are hiding behind his low batting average, and he frames strikes as well as anyone.

    72. Matt Carpenter, 3B, St. Louis Cardinals 

    70/100

    Matt Carpenter is a player without a true home on defense, so it's a good thing he brings versatility to the table. Meanwhile, his excellence at the plate is not in question. He has one of the best approaches of any hitter and continues to hit for power.

    71. Evan Longoria, 3B, Tampa Bay Rays 

    70/100

    Evan Longoria is past his prime on both sides of the ball, but his power surge is proof that even players past their primes can learn new tricks.

    70. DJ LeMahieu, 2B, Colorado Rockies 

    70/100

    The degree to which Coors Field has helped DJ LeMahieu's offensive surge shouldn't be ignored. But neither should the things he's done to push the envelope even further.

    69. Adam Eaton, RF, Chicago White Sox 

    70/100

    Adam Eaton wasn't much more than a slap hitter with occasional power before 2016. Now he's a slap hitter with occasional power who plays one hell of a right field.

    68. George Springer, RF, Houston Astros 

    70/100

    George Springer has some flaws in his game, but it's good enough for now that he's erasing his flaws at the plate and turning himself into a reliable two-way player.

    67. Zach Britton, RP, Baltimore Orioles 

    71/80

    Zach Britton probably won't win the American League Cy Young, but he's about as good as they say he is. He can throw strikes, miss bats and, most of all, limit the damage when the ball is put in play.

    66. Kevin Kiermaier, CF, Tampa Bay Rays 

    71/100

    Kevin Kiermaier's game mostly revolves around what he can do with his legs, which he uses to be both an elite baserunner and an elite defender. But while his bat isn't quite a weapon yet, it is evolving into one.

    65. Kenley Jansen, RP, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    72/80

    The Mariano Rivera comp is at once way too easy and entirely valid for Kenley Jansen. He has good command of a nasty cutter, and it brings him plenty of whiffs and quiet contact.

    64. Matt Shoemaker, SP, Los Angeles Angels 

    72/100

    Matt Shoemaker's season came to an abrupt and frightening end, but there's no ignoring how good he was when he was on the mound. He took the good command he always had and found ways to parlay it into more whiffs and some soft contact to boot.

    63. Jake Arrieta, SP, Chicago Cubs 

    72/100

    There's no question Jake Arrieta is a diminished version of the ace he became in 2015. There's also no question even a diminished version of him is still really good, particularly because it's still very difficult to hit him hard.

    62. Jose Ramirez, 3B, Cleveland Indians

    72/100

    Jose Ramirez is one of the more underrated feel-good stories of the 2016 season. A player nobody expected anything out of has gotten it done on both sides of the ball with a good bat, power, speed and defense.

    61. Brandon Crawford, SS, SF Giants 

    72/100

    Last year, Brandon Crawford made the leap from glove-only shortstop to legit two-way star. It's been more of the same this year, and this is probably the best his defense has ever been.

    60. Addison Russell, SS, Chicago Cubs 

    72/100

    Addison Russell, 22, often feels like the forgotten man in Chicago's stable of great young players. But now that he's adding some offense to go with his stupendous defense, that may not last.

    59. Andrew Miller, RP, Cleveland Indians 

    73/80

    Andrew Miller probably has the best slider in baseball, and this season we saw what he's capable of when he feels like unleashing it again and again with good command. Behold the best relief pitcher in baseball.

    58. Jose Quintana, SP, Chicago White Sox 

    73/100

    Any list of the most underrated pitchers in baseball needs to have this guy on it. Arguably at the top. Jose Quintana isn't overpowering, but he's an excellent command artist who can get outs in a number of ways.

    57. Tanner Roark, SP, Washington Nationals 

    73/100

    This is the second year out of three that Tanner Roark has quietly put up a sub-3.00 ERA in a heavy workload. He was arguably better the first time around, but there's no arguing this: He's a flat-out terrific c