Wimbledon 2016 Draw: Bracket, Schedule and Preview of Men and Women's Event

James Dudko@@JamesDudkoFeatured ColumnistJune 24, 2016

Novak Djokovic kisses the trophy after his victory over Roger Federer in the mens singles final on Centre Court during day thirteen of Wimbledon 2015 at the All England Lawn Tennis Club on July 12th 2015 in Wimbledon (Photo by Tom Jenkins/Getty Images)
Tom Jenkins/Getty Images

Andy Murray will face fellow Briton Liam Broady in the Men's Singles first round at Wimbledon 2016, starting on Monday, June 27. It's the beginning of a potentially tough route to the final for the No. 2 seed after the draw for both the men's and women's events were confirmed via BBC Sport.

Yet, Murray has at least been drawn away from defending champion Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer on his side of the bracket.

Things look tougher still for James Ward after the Englishman was drawn against Grand Slam-chasing Djokovic. Meanwhile, third seed Federer will get his tournament underway against Argentina's Guido Pella.

The women's event will begin with champion Serena Williams taking on a qualifier. Garbine Muguruza, who beat Williams at Roland Garros, will face unseeded Italian Camila Giorgi.

The draw has placed both Williams and Muguruza as likely opponents for the final.

Ben Rothenberg of the New York Times relayed the draws for both events in full, with the outcome of qualifying matches still to be determined:

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The tournament's official site highlighted some of the standout first-round matches from both events:

Sky Sports provided the full seeding information for each event. The tournament runs from June 27 to July 10 and the full schedule details are available at the official site.

Preview

All eyes will be on Murray to see if he can end Djokovic's Grand Slam bid and overcome his defeats to the Serb in the Australian and French Open. Murray enjoyed ideal preparation for Wimbledon with an historic triumph at the Queen's Club, detailed by British Tennis:

Yet, while there's no doubt Murray owns the domestic game, he's found it tough to boss Djokovic when it's really mattered, despite seeing off the World No. 1 to win Wimbledon in 2013.

Murray will likely once again lean on the core strength of his game, a quality he recently described to BBC Sport's Piers Newbery: "But I always think the return is the best part of my game and, although obviously I won't break serve in every match, in 99 out of 100 I will create break points. That means, regardless of the position, I need to keep telling myself the chances will come."

It's his all-around game that can sometimes create problems against Djokovic, another versatile player who sets a methodical pace. Murray doesn't boast the booming serve-and-volley game to consistently put the top seed under pressure.

Of course, before thinking about Djokovic, Murray must first negotiate a tricky draw to the final, one spelled out by Russell Fuller of BBC Sport:

It's a daunting run on paper, one very similar in its latter stages to the path Murray had to tread at the French Open. But two names on the list, possible fourth-round opponent Nick Kyrgios and potential quarter-finalist Stan Wawrinka, face their own tricky opening matches.

Rothenberg noted how Kyrgios is part of a lively encounter in the opening round:

As for Wawrinka, he could be wary of a precocious young upstart, according to the Open's official site:

But all of the notable contenders in the men's event will surely keep one eye focused on Djokovic's progress. After all, he's bidding for a calendar year Grand Slam, having already scooped the Australian and French Open titles.

Sky Sports' Tom Julian describes the Serb as being "head and shoulders ahead of his closest rivals." He sees a player combining peak physicality with mental efficiency: "An improved diet and training plan has strengthened both his power and endurance, mentally he seems infallible, and his technical ability appears flawless."

Julian concluded by stating it "seems almost inevitable" Djokovic will be in the final. Yet, one potential pitfall could come if he faces big-serving Milos Raonic at the quarter-final stage, a possibility given the draw.

The Canadian, a semi-finalist in 2014, has hired John McEnroe to assist his coaching team, per Raz Mirza of Sky Sports, a move that may already be paying off: "McEnroe has reinvigorated 6ft 5in [Raonic's] all-court style. He put it into practice at Queen's Club where he won all 47 of his service games en route to the final."

McEnroe is helping Raonic improve his game.
McEnroe is helping Raonic improve his game.Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images

Raonic will cause Djokovic problems if the two are pitted against one another in the last eight.

She may be starting against a qualifier, but the path will soon get tougher for 35-year-old champion Williams:

A rematch with Muguruza will likely appeal to Williams as the perfect chance to correct what happened in France. It's something relevant to Williams who has enjoyed utter domination over the women's game.

Yet there are some who believe Spaniard Muguruza is ready to supplant Williams as the best player in the women's event, according to ESPN UK's Leo Spall. Obviously, repeating her French Open victory at Wimbledon would go a long way to validating those claims.

One player in the women's event not concerned about her history with Williams is Heather Watson. She dubbed her titanic tussle with Williams at last year's tournament "old news," per Simon Briggs of the Daily Telegraph.

Meanwhile, BBC Sport's Fuller believes Laura Robson has been handed a hard-luck draw, one potentially featuring meetings with 2014 finalist Eugenie Bouchard, as well as Dominika Cibulkova.