Novak Djokovic vs. Andy Murray: French Open 2016 Men's Final Score, Reaction

Timothy Rapp@@TRappaRTFeatured ColumnistJune 5, 2016

Serbia's Novak Djokovic celebrates after winning the men's final match against Britain's Andy Murray at the Roland Garros 2016 French Tennis Open in Paris on June 5, 2016. / AFP / PHILIPPE LOPEZ        (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
PHILIPPE LOPEZ/Getty Images

Roland Garros will haunt Novak Djokovic no longer. 

The world No. 1 won the French Open for the first time Sunday to complete the career Grand Slam, defeating Andy Murray 3-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4. It was Djokovic's fourth straight Grand Slam title and his sixth in the last eight Grand Slam tournaments. The remarkable run of dominance has left him alone at the summit of men's tennis.

He also moved one step closer to joining the best players in history, as Dan Wolken of USA Today noted:

Djokovic is just the third men's player to hold all four Grand Slam titles at one time, per Telegraph Sport.

The win removed from his back the rather large monkey that seemed to hop on every time he stepped on the Roland Garros clay. Before Sunday, he had reached the French Open final three times, only to lose each time.

ESPN Stats & Info detailed the long road Djokovic took to his first French Open title:

Djokovic won 64.5 percent of his first-serve points, ripped 41 winners—to just 23 for Murray—and was phenomenal at the net, winning 26 of his 33 points there, including some scintillating shots throughout the match.

Neither player burdened himself with mistakes, as Djokovic hit 37 unforced errors and Murray 39.

Murray looked like he might beat Djokovic early on, rolling to an easy first-set win behind four aces and a 73.7 win percentage on his first serve.

Points like this one also had Murray looking capable of winning his first title in France, per Roland Garros:

But Djokovic came surging back.

The world No. 1 obliterated Murray in the next set, tallying 11 winners, forcing five break points and breaking Murray twice. The Scot managed only one break point, and he couldn't convert it.

Of course, when Djokovic hits shots like this, he's tough to beat:

The Serb continued his dominance in the third set, as he blasted another 13 winners and seemed to be in complete control.

The crowd was behind Djokovic, too, per Ben Rothenberg of the New York Times:

Murray put up a fight early in the fourth set, but the outcome was inevitable, as Matt Jones of Bleacher Report noted:

Djokovic even cracked a smile after going up 5-2:

To his credit, Murray kept playing. He broke Djokovic in the next game and held serve after that, making things a bit nervy for the top seed. But Djokovic won his next service game to finally conquer the cruel Roland Garros clay. 

As the French would say, "Vouloir, c'est pouvoir." Essentially, that translates to the popular English adage, "Where there's a will, there's a way."

Djokovic had always displayed the will at Roland Garros. On Sunday, he found the way.

Post-Match Reaction

Michel Euler/Associated Press

After the contest, it was hardly surprising that both Murray and Djokovic exuded class. Murray, in particular, was gracious in his praise of Djokovic, per Reem Abulleil of Sport360:

Finally to Novak, this is his day today. What he's achieved the last 12 months is phenomenal—winning all of the four slams in one year is an amazing achievement. This is something that is so rare in tennis, it's not happened for an extremely long time and it's going to take a long time for it to happen again. It sucks to lose the match, but I'm proud to be part of today. So congratulations, Novak. Well done.

Djokovic extended praise to Murray as well.

"It was a pleasure to play against you once more," he said, per Roland Garros. "I'm sure I will be seeing you with the big trophies in the future."

Djokovic also thanked the crowd:

And, of course, he thanked his supporting cast.

"My family, my team, my loves, thank you so much for tolerating everything on a daily basis," he said, per Roland Garros.

Now that Djokovic has won the first two Grand Slams of the year, attention will turn to his quest to obtain all four of the major titles in 2016.

Wimbledon is next. He's won there three times, including in 2014 and 2015. Then there's the U.S. Open. He's won there twice, including last year. At this point, who is going to bet against him to win both?

And more importantly: Who is going to stop him?

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