Daily Fantasy Baseball 2015: These MLB Advanced Metrics Can Make You a Winner

Curtis Calhoun@@CalhounCurtisFeatured ColumnistJuly 17, 2015

Daily Fantasy Baseball 2015: These MLB Advanced Metrics Can Make You a Winner

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    BILL KOSTROUN/Associated Press

    When doing research on your favorite player, you may come across some statistic types you might have never heard of before. These metrics can help you win your fantasy baseball league if you know more about them and how they work.

    Here are four types of MLB advanced metrics that can help you in your respective fantasy baseball leagues.

Batting Average on Balls in Play (BABIP)

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    Stephen Brashear/Associated Press

    Calculation

    (H – HR)/(AB – K – HR + SF)

    Explanation

    The statistic is measured by a player’s contact and aggressiveness aside from striking out and walking. This measures a player’s plate discipline while also focusing on balls solely hit into the field of play.

    Limitation

    The problem with this metric is it only shows the batting average on balls in play. This doesn’t include on-base percentage statistics such as walks, times hit by pitches and so forth.

    Example

    Mariners designated hitter Nelson Cruz has a BABIP of .359.

    Interpretation: When Cruz makes contact, he usually gets on base and makes an impact. His high BABIP indicates that he is a strong all-around hitter when he makes contact.

Walk-to-Strikeout Ratio (BB/K)

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press

    Calculation

    (Total Walks)/(Total Strikeouts)

    Explanation

    This statistic measures a batter’s frequency of walking compared to his frequency of striking out, which is combined into a single ratio. A high ratio indicates that the player has great discipline, and a low ratio indicates a player has poor plate discipline.

    Limitation

    This metric demonstrates plate discipline, which doesn’t include hits or getting hit by a pitch. It measures plate discipline from the standpoint of only walking rather than considering all areas of hitting.

    Example

    Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki has a walk-to-strikeout ratio of 0.29.

    Interpretation: This statistic shows that Tulowitzki doesn’t have good plate discipline and strikes out far more than he walks.

Left-on-Base Percentage (LOB%)

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    John Minchillo/Associated Press

    Calculation

    (H + BB + HBP - R)/(H + BB + HBP - (1.4 * HR))

    Explanation

    This metric measures a pitcher’s chances of leaving runners on base.

    Limitation

    The problem with this statistic is that it doesn’t reflect runners not left on base who scored, home runs or other forms of hitting. A pitcher could have a high left-on-base percentage but could also have a high ERA.

    Example

    Mariners ace Felix Hernandez has a left-on-base percentage of 80 percent.

    Interpretation: Hernandez usually gets out of early jams and capitalizes on his opportunities.

Walks Plus Hits Per Innings Pitched (WHIP)

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    Jim Mone/Associated Press

    Calculation

    (Total Walks + Total Hits)/(Total Innings Pitched)

    Explanation

    This statistic measures a pitcher’s walks and hits allowed in the form of a ratio that measures a pitcher’s command and ability to stop teams from getting on base.

    Limitation

    This statistic doesn’t reflect runs scored or batters getting hit by a pitch. It is simply about allowing base opportunities to opposing batters.

    Example

    Orioles pitcher Ubaldo Jimenez has a WHIP of 1.27.

    Interpretation: Jimenez allows nearly one walk or hit per inning pitched. This exemplifies that Jimenez generally allows low-risk plays to happen and is able to get out of jams.

    Metric calculations are from FanGraphs.com. Follow Curtis on Twitter: @CalhounCurtis.

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