40 Worst Pitching Performances in World Series History

Joel Reuter@JoelReuterBRFeatured ColumnistOctober 18, 2011

40 Worst Pitching Performances in World Series History

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    The World Series has given us some fantastic moments through the years and lifted many a player to legendary status for his heroics when it mattered most.

    On the other end of the spectrum, it has also given us some legendary goats, players who choked with the entire nation watching and cost their team victory. While the occasional error made a big difference, more times than not it is a pitcher who ends up filling the role of goat.

    So here is a look through the years of the 40 worst pitching performances in World Series history—pitchers who struggled when their teams needed them most.

Mordecai Brown: 1906 Game 6

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    Line: 1.2 IP, 8 H, 7 R, 7 ER, Loss

    Facing elimination down 3-2 in the series, the Cubs turned to ace Mordecai Brown for Game 6, hoping he could shut down the White Sox after he had given up just two runs in 18 innings of work in two previous starts.

    However, after giving up four hits including a pair of doubles and three runs in the first inning, things only got worse for Brown in the second inning as he got two quick outs but went on to allow four more innings before the team had to go to the bullpen.

    In the end, the Cubs lost the game 8-3 and the series, as Brown dug them a hole they couldn't get out of.

Harry McIntire: 1910 Game 3

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 3 H, 4 R, 4 ER, Loss

    Facing a good Athletics lineup and trailing 2-0 in the series, the Cubs sent Ed Reulbach to the mound looking to turn things around.

    However, he struggled early giving up three runs through two innings, and the Cubs pinch hit for him in the bottom of the second. While they managed to push across two runs that inning to tie things up at three, that also meant a move to the bullpen for the Cubs.

    Harry McIntire got the nod and didn't last long getting the first out of the third inning before giving up a single, triple and hitting a batter before allowing a three-run home run to Danny Murphy to put the team down 7-3.

Smoky Joe Wood: 1912 Game 7

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    Line: 1 IP, 7 H, 6 R, 6 ER, Loss

    With the Red Sox leading the series 3-1, having tied the Giants in Game 2, ace Smoky Joe Wood took the mound in Game 7 with a chance to clinch the series.

    Wood went 34-5 with a 1.91 ERA during the regular season in what was the best year of his career, and after winning his first two starts of the series, Wood struggled mightily.

    The Giants batted around against Wood in the first inning, and he did not come back out in the second inning as he turned in one of the worst first innings in series history.

    He bounced back the next day, though, pitching three innings of relief to get the win in the decisive game, and he finished the series with a line of 3-1, 4.50 ERA, 21 Ks, 22 IP over three starts and four appearances. Not bad numbers considering his one terrible outing.

Jack Bentley: 1923 Game 5

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    Line: 1 IP, 5 H, 2 BB, 7 R, 6 ER, Loss

    With the series tied 2-2, the Giants sent Jack Bentley to the mound to combat the potent Yankees lineup, and he faced seven batters in a three-run first inning.

    It wouldn't be any better in the second inning as he allowed a three-run, inside-the-park home run to Joe Dugan before leaving the game, and in all, the Giants trailed 7-0 heading into the third inning.

Art Reinhart: 1926 Game 4

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    Line: 0 IP, 1 H, 4 BB, 4 R, 4 ER, Loss

    After falling behind 3-1 early in Game 4, the Cardinals struck for three runs in the bottom of the fourth inning to take the lead and decided to lift starter Flint Rhem for swingman Art Reinhart heading into the fifth inning.

    However, Reinhart displayed perhaps the worst control in World Series history, though, as he struggled mightily.

    He walked the first batter of the inning, then allowed an RBI double before walking the next three batters he faced before being pulled. Before the inning was over, the Cardinals were down 7-4, and they would end up losing 10-5.

Pete Alexander: 1928 Game 2 and 4

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    Game 2 Line: 2.1 IP, 6 H, 4 BB, 8 R, 8 ER, Loss

    Game 4 Line: 2.2 IP, 4 H, 3 R, 3 ER

    After dropping Game 1 of the series to the Yankees, the Cardinals turned to 41-year-old future Hall of Famer Pete Alexander for the Game 2 start, and with a 16-9 regular season, he still had plenty left despite his age.

    Not enough to counter the Yankees potent lineup though, as he gave up a three-run home run to Lou Gehrig in the first inning and didn't get any better from there pitching into the third inning and leaving the game with one out, the bases loaded and the score 6-3.

    He then came on in the seventh inning of Game 4 with the team trailing 3-2 and was unable to keep things close, giving a run in the seventh and two more in the eighth as the Cardinals were swept in four games.

Jakie May: 1932 Game 4

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    Line: 3.1 IP, 8 H, 3 BB, 6 R, 6 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Down 3-0 in the series and facing elimination, the Cubs had all hands on deck for Game 4 and Jakie May took the mound with runners on first and second and no one out in the fourth inning, looking to protect a 4-3 lead.

    He got out of that inning and pitched a scoreless fifth but surrendered the lead in the sixth on a two-run single by Lou Gehrig. The Cubs tied things back up at five in the bottom of the sixth, but May then got shelled in the seventh for four runs as the game and the series was over before that inning ended.

Bump Hadley: 1937 Game 4

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    Line: 1.1 IP, 6 H, 5 R, 5 ER, Loss

    Up 3-0 in the series, the Yankees had a chance to close things out against the Giants in Game 4, and they sent Bump Hadley to the hill.

    After posting an ERA over 5.00 during the regular season, Hadley looked strong early in his lone postseason start as he pitched a scoreless first inning after the team spotted him a run in the top of the first.

    However, he hit the wall in the second inning as he gave up four straight singles, a fielder's choice and then another single before being pulled. They Giants would go on to win, but the hope was short lived as the Yankees ended the series in the next game.

Hal Newhouser: 1945 Game 1

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    Line: 2.2 IP, 8 H, 7 R, 7 ER, Loss

    There was no better pitcher in the American League in 1945 than Hal Newhouser as he went 25-9, 1.81 ERA, 212 Ks to win the Triple Crown and take home AL MVP honors.

    However, he was not the same pitcher to open the World Series, as he was shelled in his Game 1 start giving up four first inning runs and another three runs in the third before being lifted.

    Newhouser got the last laugh, earning complete game victories in Game 5 and Game 7 as the Tigers won the series, making his horrible Game 1 start even more surprising.

Hank Borowy: 1945 Game 7

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    Line: 0 IP, 3 H, 3 R, 3 ER, Loss

    Purchased from the Yankees at midseason, Hank Borowy went 11-2 with a 2.13 ERA in 15 games with the Cubs and then pitched a shutout in Game 1 of the World Series.

    After taking the loss in Game 5, he got the win in relief in Game 6 and then got the start for Game 7. However, he was clearly burned out by that point.

    After allowing three straight singles to open the game, the Cubs went to the 'pen and put in Paul Derringer and before the first inning was over, the team was trailing 5-0. That would prove to be an insurmountable lead as the team dropped Game 7.

Russ Meyer: 1950 Game 3

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    Meyer Line: 0.2 IP, 3 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Loss

    Down 2-0 to the Yankees in the series, the Phillies got a terrific start from Ken Heintzelman who went 7.2 innings allowing just four hits and two runs.

    He exited the game with two outs and the bases loaded for Jim Konstanty and a Granny Hamner resulted in a blown save despite him not officially giving up a hit.

    That tied things up heading into the ninth inning, and Russ Meyer came on to pitch the bottom of the ninth for the Phillies. After getting the first two outs of the inning, Meyer allowed three straight singles with the third one scoring a run and giving the Yankees the win.

Karl Spooner: 1955 Game 6

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 3 H, 2 BB, 5 R, 5 ER, Loss

    Leading the Yankees 3-2 in the series, the Dodgers sent 24-year-old Karl Spooner to the mound to go up against Whitey Ford.

    Ford would go on to pitch a complete game and allow just four hits and one run, while Spooner would finish with a line that for all intents and purposes was the exact opposite.

    He started the game sandwiching a strikeout between two walks, then gave up back-to-back singles before surrendering a three-run home run to Bill Skowron to chase him from the game.

Jim Coates & Ralph Terry: 1960 Game 7

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    Coates Line: 0.2 IP, 2 H, 2 R, 2 ER, Blown Save

    Terry Line: 0.1 IP, 1 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Loss

    Heading into the bottom of the eighth inning of the deciding Game 7 of the series, the Pirates trailed the Yankees 7-4.

    The Pirates came through in the eighth inning though, as they struck for five runs in the bottom of the eighth, capped by a three-run home run from Hal Smith off Jim Coates to give the Pirates a 9-7 lead heading into the ninth inning.

    As quickly as they had the lead they lost it though, as the Yankees manufactured a run to tie things up heading into the bottom of the ninth.

    Yankees reliever Ralph Terry had come on to get the final out of the eighth inning, and he faced Bill Mazeroski to lead off the ninth inning, and he was abruptly met with a walk-off home run from the defensive-minded second baseman to give the Pirates the series.

Jose Santiago: 1967 Game 4

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    Line: 0.2 IP, 6 H, 4 R, 4 ER, Loss

    Despite making just 11 starts, while appearing in 39 games as a reliever and saving five, Jose Santiago got the start for the Red Sox with the Red Sox trailing the Cardinals 2-1 in the series.

    He was greeted by back-to-back singles and a double as the Cardinals jumped to an early 2-0 lead to open the game. Santiago gave up three more singles and two more runs as he was unable to escape the first inning and was pulled with two outs.

    The Red Sox managed to fight back in the series and force it to seven games, but in the end, the Cardinals came out on top.

Eddie Watt: 1970 Game 4

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    Line: 1 IP, 2 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Despite a rocky start from Jim Palmer in which he gave up five runs through seven innings, the Orioles held a 5-3 lead heading into the eighth inning of Game 4 looking to put away the Reds in four games.

    After Palmer opened the eight inning with a walk and a single, Eddie Watt came on in relief and promptly surrendered a three-run home run to the first batter he faced—Lee May.

    He struck out the side from there to get out of the inning, but the Orioles were held scoreless over the final two innings as the May home run proved to be the difference in a 6-5 loss.

Clay Carroll: 1972 Game 4

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    Line: 0 IP, 3 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Behind 2-1 in the series, the Reds took a 2-1 lead into the ninth inning with a chance to even the series with the Athletics heading into Game 5.

    After pitching a scoreless eighth, Pedro Borbon took the mound to start the ninth inning for the Reds, and after getting the first batter out, he gave up a single and was lifted for closer Clay Carroll.

    The NL saves leader during the regular season with 37, Carroll also led the league in appearances with 65 and finished fifth in NL Cy Young voting. He didn't bring that A-game in this outing though, as he allowed three straight singles to blow the save and then take the loss.

Dick Drago: 1975 Game 2

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    Line: 1 IP, 2 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    After getting a stellar start from starter Bill Lee who went eight innings and allowed just five hits and two runs, the Red Sox turned things over to Dick Drago with a 2-1 lead after Lee allowed a leadoff double to the Reds Johnny Bench to open the ninth.

    After getting two quick outs, Dave Concepcion tied things up with an RBI single, and he then stole second base and scored on a Ken Griffey double to give the Reds the lead.

    The Red Sox were held scoreless in the bottom of the inning as the Reds escaped with the win and evened the series at 1-1.

Rawly Eastwick & Pat Darcy: 1975 Game 6

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    Eastwick Line:1 IP, 2 H, 1 BB, 1 R, 1 ER, Blown Save

    Darcy Line: 2 IP, 1 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Loss

    Facing elimination down 3-2 in the series, the Red Sox trailed 6-3 heading into the bottom of the eighth inning, and when they put two men on to open the inning, Rawly Eastwick came on in relief and got out the first two batters he faced.

    With the pitcher's spot due up, the Red Sox called on their top bat off the bench in Bernie Carbo, and he responded with a huge three-run home run to tie things up.

    Things stayed knotted up at 3-3 heading into the bottom of the eleventh as Pat Darcy began his third innings of work for the Reds, and he faced Carlton Fisk to lead off the inning. With a 1-0 count, Fisk hit a drive down the left field line and in one of baseball's iconic moments waved, it fair for the walk-off win.

Kent Tekulve: 1979 Game 4

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    Line: 1.2 IP, 3 H, 2 BB, 3 R, 3 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Trailing 2-1 in the series, the Pirates carried a 6-3 lead into the eighth inning of Game 4 and seemed to have things well in hand.

    The team turned to Don Robinson to open the eighth inning, but he loaded the bases with only one out, and the team was forced to turn to closer Kent Tekulve, and the Orioles promptly unloaded the bases with a two-run double from pinch-hitter John Lowenstein.

    It didn't stop there though, and by the time the inning was over, the Pirates trailed 9-6. Tekulve stayed in and pitched a scoreless top of the ninth, but the damage was done as the team was unable to come back.

Larry Christenson: 1980 Game 4

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 5 H, 4 R, 4 ER, Loss

    Up 2-1 in the series, the Phillies had a chance to jump out to a huge 3-1 series lead in Game 4, but things went south quickly.

    After making just 14 starts in the regular season and going 5-1 with a 4.03 ERA, Christenson got the nod to start the game, but he struggled early and failed to make it out of the first inning.

    After giving up a leadoff single then getting the first out of the inning, Christenson gave up a triple, home run and back-to-back doubles as he was unable to even get the second out of the inning.

    The Phillies lost the game, as the series fell to 2-2, but bounced back and won the next two games to take the series.

Don Sutton: 1982 Game 6

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    Line: 4.1 IP, 7 H, 7 R, 5 ER, Loss

    Up 3-2 in the series, Don Sutton took the mound for the Brewers against the Cardinals in Game 6 with a chance to clinch the title.

    The 37-year-old Sutton was acquired on August 30th from the Astros and went 4-1 with a 3.29 ERA in seven starts with the team down the stretch and pitched six solid innings in Game 2 to get a no decision.

    After a 1-2-3 first inning, the Cardinals struck for a two runs in the bottom of the second inning, and two-run home runs by Darrell Porter and Keith Hernandez chased Sutton before he could get out of the fifth inning.

    The Brewers would go on to lose the game, and they lost again in Game 7 as they had two chances to close out the series but couldn't.

Todd Worrell: 1985 Game 6

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 3 H, 2 R, 2 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    With the Cardinals leading the series 3-2, the Royals entered Game 6 in a must-win situation, but they found themselves trailing 1-0 heading into the bottom of the ninth and set to face Cardinals rookie closer Todd Worrell.

    Pinch-hitter Jorge Orta led off the inning and was called safe on an infield single despite the fact that he was clearly out as umpire Don Denkinger blew the call. That was followed by a single, a ground out and an intentional walk to bring up pinch-hitter Dane Iorg with the bases loaded and one out.

    The 35-year-old had hit just .213 during the regular season with only 21 RBI, but he came through when it mattered with a single to right, scoring two runs and sending the series to a Game 7 that the Royals would go on to win.

    Worrell, who still had rookie eligibility, would break the rookie saves record with 36 the following season and go on to a solid career despite the early career failure.

Calvin Schiraldi and Bob Stanley: 1986 Game 6

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    Schiraldi Line: 2.2 IP, 4 H, 2 BB, 4 R, 3 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Stanley Line: 0 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 0 ER, Blown Save

    After seven solid innings from Roger Clemens in Game 6, the Red Sox went to reliever Calvin Schiraldi to keep the score where it was, and he had been great during the regular season with a 1.41 ERA in 25 appearances.

    However, he surrendered the lead in the eighth inning on a Gary Carter sacrifice fly, bringing things to 3-3. The game went to extras, and the Red Sox struck for two runs in the top of the 10th. Schiraldi then came on for his third inning of work, and after two quick outs, he allowed three straight singles.

    The Red Sox then called on Bob Stanley, clinging to a 5-4 lead, and after he uncorked a wild pitch to allow the tying run to score, he induced a ground ball to first base that went through Bill Buckner's legs for the most infamous error in baseball history and the walkoff win.

Juan Berenguer: 1987 Game 3

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 4 H, 3 R, 3 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    With the Twins leading 2-0 in the series, Les Straker took the mound to start Game 3 and pitched very well going six innings and giving up just four hits and no runs.

    He then turned the ball over to journeyman reliever Juan Berenguer clinging to a 1-0 lead, and he immediately ran into trouble giving up back-to-back singles to open the seventh.

    After a sacrifice bunt put runners on second and third, Vince Coleman gave the Cardinals the lead with a two-run double. Coleman then stole third and scored on an Ozzie Smith single. That was enough for Berenguer to get pulled as he managed just one out while surrendering three runs.

Dennis Eckersley: 1988 Game 1

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    Line: 0.2 IP, 1 H, 1 BB, 2 R, 2 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Leading 4-3 heading into the ninth inning of Game 1, the A's turned to their all-world closer Dennis Eckersley, who had an AL-best 45 saves and finished second in AL Cy Young voting, to slam the door in the ninth inning.

    After getting two quick outs, Eck walked pinch-hitter Mike Davis, and the Dodgers turned to Kirk Gibson to pinch hit for the pitcher's spot.

    With two bad knees, Gibson hobbled up to the plate as the Dodgers' last chance. After fouling off a number of pitches, he managed to work a full count before getting the slider he was looking for and depositing it over the right field fence for one of the most dramatic home runs in baseball history.

Storm Davis: 1988 Game 2

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    Line: 3.1 IP, 8 H, 6 R, 6 ER, Loss

    With the Dodgers energized from their Game 1 win, the team jumped all over Athletics starter and 16-game winner Storm Davis in Game 2, striking for five runs in the third inning including a three-run home run by Mike Marshall.

    An RBI double by Dodgers pitcher Orel Hershiser was the final straw as Davis got the hook with one out in the fourth inning and while the Athletics bullpen held the the Dodgers scoreless the rest of the way the damage done against Davis was enough as they won 6-0.

    Up 2-0 in the series, the Dodgers dropped Game 3 before winning the next two to take the series in five games.

Dennis Eckersley: 1990 Game 2

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 3 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Loss

    Two years removed from giving up a dramatic home run to Kirk Gibson in the 1988 World Series, Eckersley again found himself on the mound when a game ended in the Game 2 of the 1990 series.

    The A's held a 4-3 lead heading into the eighth inning, but the Reds managed to push across a run in the bottom of the eighth and the game went to extra innings.

    Eckersley came on in the bottom of the 10th and got cleanup hitter Eric Davis out to open the innings. From there, however, he surrendered three straight singles with catcher Joe Oliver driving in the winning run.

Charlie Leibrandt: 1991 Game 6

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    Line: 0 IP, 1 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Loss

    The starting pitcher who took the loss in Game 1, Charlie Leibrandt did not appear again until Game 6 as he entered the game in the 11th inning of a 3-3 games with the Braves leading the series 3-2.

    The first batter of the bottom of the 11th was Twins All-Star center fielder Kirby Puckett, and he greeted Leibrandt with a walkoff home run on a 2-1 count. Four pitches, one home run allowed, one loss. Stat lines don't get much worse than that.

Jeff Reardon: 1992 Game 2 & 3

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    Game 2 Line: 1.1 IP, 1 H, 1 BB, 2 R, 2 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Game 3 Line: 0 IP, 1 H

    After taking Game 1 of the series, the Braves held a 4-2 lead heading into the eighth with starter John Smoltz pitching great.

    However, Smoltz ran into trouble in the eighth, allowing a run and exiting the game with runners on first and third and one out. Mike Stanton came on and got the second out before closer Jeff Reardon came on, promptly striking out Kelly Gruber to end the threat.

    Still leading 4-3, Reardon took the mound in the ninth, and after a quick first out, he walked Derek Bell before surrendering a go-ahead home run to Ed Sprague, blowing the save and eventually getting the loss.

    It didn't stop there though, as Reardon took the mound again in Game 3 with the bases loaded, one out and the score tied 2-2 in the bottom of the ninth. Candy Maldonado was the first batter he faced, and after working a 2-2 count, Maldonado singled to center for the walkoff win, spoiling a terrific starter by Steve Avery in which he worked into the ninth.

Mitch Williams: 1993 Game 6

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 2 HR, 1 BB, 3 R,  3 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    With the Blue Jays up 3-2 in the series, the Blue Jays held a 5-1 lead heading into the top of the seventh inning with starter Dave Stewart pitching well.

    However, Stewart led off the inning allowing a walk, a single and then a three-run Lenny Dykstra home run promptly chased him from the game, and before the inning was over, the Phillies had taken a 6-5 leada lead they still held going into the bottom of the ninth.

    The Phillies turned to closer Mitch Williams in the ninth. Williams had 43 saves during the regular season, but he was not known as "Wild Thing" for nothing, as he walked the first batter of the inning in Rickey Henderson.

    After getting a fly out, Williams then surrendered a single to Paul Molitor. That brought up Joe Carter with runners on first and second, and he hit a 2-2 pitch to deep left field, just clearing the wall to give the Jays the win and the series.

Andy Pettitte: 1996 Game 1

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    Line: 2.1 IP, 6 H, 7 R, 7 ER, Loss

    Coming off a 21-8 regular season in just his second full year in the majors, Andy Pettitte got the nod for the Game 1 start of the 1996 World Series.

    Clearly feeling the pressure, the 24-year-old followed up a 1-2-3 first inning by giving up a two-run home run to Andruw Jones in the second inning.

    Things really got messy in the third inning though, as a two-run single by Chipper Jones and an RBI single by Fred McGriff got Pettitte the boot with runners on first and second with one out.

    Brian Boehringer then gave up a three-run home run to Andruw Jones and went on to give up five total runs of his own in three innings of relief work as the Braves went on to win 12-1.

Mark Wohlers: 1996 Game 4

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    Line: 2 IP, 6 H, 3 R, 3 ER, Blown Save

    Leading the Yankees 2-1 in the series, the Braves jumped out to a early 6-0 lead in Game 4. That was trimmed to 6-3 when starter Denny Neagle ran into trouble in the sixth inning and gave up three runs before being lifted.

    Still, the Braves led 6-3 heading into the eighth inning, and Braves manager Bobby Cox called on closer Mark Wohlers for a two-inning save.

    He struggled out of the gate though, giving up back-to-back singles to open in the eighth before eventually giving up a three-run home run to Jim Leyrtiz.

    The Yankees went on to win the game in extra innings and eventually won the series, and many point to the Leyritz home run as the true beginning of the team's successful run.

Jose Mesa: 1997 Game 7

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    Line: 1.2 IP, 4 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Blown Save

    After a back-and-forth series between the Indians and Marlins, the teams went to a deciding seventh game, and the Indians jumped out to a 2-0 lead on a two-run single by Tony Fernandez in the top of the third.

    A Bobby Bonilla home run to lead off the bottom of the seventh pulled the Marlins with 2-1, but the score remained there heading into the bottom of the ninth, and the Indians called on closer Jose Mesa to finish it out.

    After surrendering a leadoff single, Mesa got the first out of the inning on a strikeout but gave up another single to put runners on first and third with one out for Craig Counsell who lifted a fly ball to deep right field to score Moises Alou on a sacrifice fly. Mesa got out of the inning without further damage, but the save was blown, and the Marlins would go on to win it in the 11th.

Trevor Hoffman: 1998 Game 3

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    Line: 2 IP, 2 H, 2 R, 2 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Facing the heavily-favored Yankees and trailing the series 2-0, the Padres held a 3-2 lead going into the eighth inning, and after Randy Myers walked the first batter of the eighth inning, the Padres called on closer Trevor Hoffman for a two-inning save.

    After getting a fly ball out from the first batter he faced, Hoffman walked a man before giving up a three-run home run to Scott Brosius.

    The Padres got one run back in the bottom of the eighth to pull within 5-4, and Hoffman threw a perfect top of the ninth, but Mariano Rivera slammed the door in the ninth, and the Yankees complete the sweep the following game.

Armando Benitez: 2000 Game 1

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    Line: 1 IP, 2 H, 1 R, 1 ER, Blown Save

    With the Yankees and Mets squaring off in the World Series, all eyes were on the city of New York for what was being hailed as the Subway Series.

    After trailing 2-0 much of the game, the Mets struck for three runs in the bottom of the seventh inning and held that one run lead heading into the bottom of the ninth.

    The Mets called on closer Armando Benitez to finish things out, but after getting the first out of the inning, he loaded the bases and surrendered a sacrifice fly to blow the save. He would escape the inning without further damage, but the Yankees eventually won it in the 12th.

Byung-Hyun Kim: 2001 Game 4 & 5

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    Game 4 Line: 2.2 IP, 4 H, 3 R, 3 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Game 5 Line: 0.2 IP, 2 H, 2 R, 2 ER, Blown Save

    After jumping out to a 2-1 series lead, the Diamondbacks held a 3-1 lead heading into the eighth inning of Game 4.

    Diamondbacks manager Bob Brenly turned to his closer Byung-Hyun Kim for a two-inning save. Kim looked great in the eighth inning striking out the side. Things would not go as smoothly in the ninth inning, however.

    After the Diamondbacks failed to score in the top of the 10th, Brenly decided to stick with his closer for a third inning. He got the first two batters of the inning out but couldn't get past Derek Jeter as he launched a walkoff home run.

    Showing all the confidence in the world in his closer, Bob Brenly turned to Byung-Hyun Kim once again to protect a two-run lead in Game 5.

    Jorge Posada led off the ninth inning with a double, but he got the next two batters out bringing the Yankees to their final out once again. And once again, the Yankees came though as this time, it was Scott Brosius who launched a two-run home run to tie things up, as the Yankees eventually won it in the bottom of the 12th.

Mariano Rivera: 2001 Game 7

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    Line: 1.1 IP, 4 H, 2 R, 1 ER, Blown Save, Loss

    Capping off one of the most exciting World Series of all time, the Diamondbacks entered Game 7 coming off of a 15-2 victory in Game 6 as they managed to bounce back from the back-to-back blown saves of Byung-Hyun Kim.

    However, things looked to be all over as the Diamondbacks entered the bottom of the ninth inning trailing 2-1 set to face the greatest closer of all time in Mariano Rivera.

    Mark Grace led off the ninth with a single, and an error by Rivera put runners on first and second with no one out. A failed sacrifice bunt by Jay Bell made it first and second with one out when leadoff hitter Tony Womack smacked a double down the right field line to score one and tie things up.

    Clearly rattled, Rivera hit the next batter to bring Luis Gonzalez to the plate. Bases loaded, bottom of the ninth, tie game, World Series Game 7, the ultimate scenario, and Gonzalez delivered with a bloop single to score Bell and give Arizona the title.

Felix Rodriguez: 2002 Game 6

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    Line: 0.1 IP, 1 H, 1 R, 1 ER, ND

    After pitching 5.1 shutout innings, Russ Ortiz ran into trouble allowing back-to-back singles, and manager Dusty Baker pulled the trigger bringing on reliever Felix Rodriguez.

    With the Angels facing elimination, Scott Spiezio was the first batter Rodriguez faced, and he allowed a three-run home run to pull the Angels within two runs, 5-3.

    The home run gave the Angels all the momentum in the world, and they went on to win Game 6 and then Game 7 as they came back to take the series.

Woody Williams: 2004 Game 1

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    Line: 2.1 IP, 8 H, 3 BB, 7 R, 7 ER, ND

    After going 2-0 and allowing just six runs in 19 innings of work leading up to the World Series, Woody Williams took the mound in Game 1 against a Red Sox team coming off an epic comeback against the Yankees in the ALCS.

    They jumped all over Williams, as David Ortiz hit a three-run home run in the first inning and a Bill Mueller RBI single made it 4-0 heading into the second inning. He then loaded the bases in the second innings but tightrope walked out of trouble.

    He loaded the bases again to open the third inning, and an RBI single by Johnny Damon was enough for Williams to get the hook.

Brad Lidge: 2009 Game 4

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    Line: 1 IP, 3 H, 3 R, 3 ER, Loss

    While Brad Lidge saved 31 games during the regular season in 2009, he also posted a bloated 7.21 ERA, yet he remained the team's closer heading into the postseason.

    Trailing the series 2-1, the Phillies turned to Lidge in the ninth inning of Game 4 to keep things tied up at four.

    After inducing a popup from Hideki Matsui and striking out Derek Jeter, Lidge gave up a single to Johnny Damon. Damon then stole second and third base and was eventually driven in on an Alex Rodriguez triple.

    A two-run single by Jorge Posada capped the Yankees scoring, but that was enough as they came away with a 7-4 win, and the Yankees eventually won the series in six games.