NHL: The Top 50 Players Who Never Won a Stanley Cup

Name NameCorrespondent IDecember 29, 2010

NHL: The Top 50 Players Who Never Won a Stanley Cup

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    Players in the National Hockey League often set goals for themselves.

    Some look to score 30 goals in a year, while others are trying to score their first. Some aim to compete in 1,000 games, while others shoot for the 1,000-point mark. Some focus on playing solid defensively and attempt a positive plus-minus, while others are focused on bigger things, such as helping their team make the playoffs.

    However, there is one universal goal that is shared throughout the entire league.

    To win the Stanley Cup.

    The feeling of hoisting the Cup above your head and skating it around the rink is said to induce emotions of pure bliss, excitement and speechlessness. It is the ultimate moment for any hockey player, or fan for that matter.

    On the other hand, there are the numerous players who, despite their best efforts, never had the chance to taste Lord Stanley's sweet victory. 

    These are the players we will be focusing on today. The players who have proved that a Stanley Cup victory doesn't define your career.

    There will be one requirement to make this list, and that will be retirement. The player must be officially retired, because it's too tough to judge the odds of their current team winning the Cup.

    Here are the Top 50 Players Who Never Won a Stanley Cup.

Active Players That Would Have Made the List

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    **All stats as of December 29, 2010.**

    Paul Kariya, Unrestricted Free Agent - It's safe to assume that Kariya's career is almost finished, if not completed already. The small winger had to sit out this season due to post-concussion syndrome and has had a past history of concussion problems. Kariya, 36, is currently a UFA, and would certainly by in the top 30 of this list had he officially retired. (989 GP, 402 G, 587 A, 989 P)

    Jarome Iginla, Calgary Flames - Iginla has spent his entire career with the Calgary Flames. He had a chance at the Cup in the 2003-2004 season when his team made it to the Finals, but lost to the Tampa Bay Lightning in seven games. (1061 G, 456 G, 498 A, 954 P)

    Alexander Ovechkin, Washington Capitals - Although only 25, Ovechkin's play has been so great throughout his short career, that if he retired tomorrow, his name would appear on this list. (435 G, 283 G, 288 A, 571 P)

Honourable Mention: Craig Hartsburg, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 570
    • Regular Season Goals: 98
    • Regular Season Assists: 315
    • Regular Season Points: 413
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 61
    • Playoff Goals: 15
    • Playoff Assists: 27
    • Playoff Points: 42

    We begin this list with a player who has not only missed out on the Stanley Cup as a player, but also as a coach. Craig Hartsburg spent his entire playing career as a defenceman for the Minnesota North Stars and has coached the Anaheim Ducks (named Mighty Ducks at the time), Chicago Blackhawks, and most recently the Ottawa Senators.

    Despite tallying 818 career penalty minutes, Hartsburg was not known as a very physical blueliner. He played a solid game and some referred to him as an exceptional skater.

    However, Hartsburg was forced to retire at the age of 30 due to a large quantity of injuries. Multiple knee surgeries, a broken leg, an infected ankle and numerous herniated disks are examples of the injuries Hartsburg endured.

50. Garry Unger, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1105
    • Regular Season Goals: 413
    • Regular Season Assists: 391
    • Regular Season Points: 804
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 52
    • Playoff Goals: 12
    • Playoff Assists: 18
    • Playoff Points: 30

    Garry "Iron Man" Unger is likely best known for the record he set of most consecutive games played, with 914. That record has since been broken by reigning "Iron Man" Doug Jarvis, but Unger's mark is still respectable.

    Unger was traded four times during his streak, but that didn't seem to phase him. His run came to a stop when Calgary Flames coach Al MacNeil benched him.

    One of those trades was triggered by a strange concept. The Detroit Red Wings shipped Unger to the St. Louis Blues simply because Ned Harkness didn't like Unger's hair. Harkness ordered his entire team to get crew-cuts, and when Unger refused, it was clear that his time as a Red Wing was done.

49. Felix Potvin, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 635
    • Regular Season Wins: 266
    • Regular Season Losses: 260
    • Regular Season Ties: 85
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 32
    • Regular Season GAA: 2.76
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 72
    • Playoff Wins: 35
    • Playoff Losses: 37
    • Playoff Ties: -
    • Playoff Shutouts: 8
    • Playoff GAA: 2.64
    • -
    • NHL All-Rookie Team (1993)

    Felix Potvin is the first goaltender to appear on this list. He began his career with the Toronto Maple Leafs, where many believe he played his best hockey.

    One could often observe Potvin carrying the Maple Leafs, allowing them to compete in games they had no right to be competing in. In the 1996-97 campaign, he set a club record by playing in 74 games. That same year he also set a league record for most shots faced in a season.

    Potvin quickly earned the nickname "The Cat" due to his lightning-fast reflexes and calm manner. His first name and lack of size were also contributors.

48. Bill Gadsby, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1248
    • Regular Season Goals: 130
    • Regular Season Assists: 438
    • Regular Season Points: 568
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 67
    • Playoff Goals: 4
    • Playoff Assists: 23
    • Playoff Points: 27
    • -
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1956, 1958, 1959)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1953, 1954, 1957, 1965)
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (1970)

    A 20-year NHL player, Bill Gadsby was known for giving his all in every game. Many recall him to be a very competitive player with a work ethic that stood out among others.

    Gadsby suited up for the Chicago Blackhawks, New York Rangers and Detroit Red Wings throughout his career. In 1,248 games with those teams, he amassed over 600 stitches...ouch.

47. David Babych, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1195
    • Regular Season Goals: 142
    • Regular Season Assists: 581
    • Regular Season Points: 723
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 114
    • Playoff Goals: 21
    • Playoff Assists: 41
    • Playoff Points: 62

    David Babych is another long-time NHL player, lacing up his skates for 19 seasons. He could have played even longer had he not been hindered by a broken foot.

    Babych played for five teams in his career—the Winnipeg Jets, Hartford Whalers, Vancouver Canucks, Philadelphia Flyers and Los Angeles Kings. In that time, he accumulated a startling plus-minus of minus-223.

46. Roy Worters, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 484
    • Regular Season Wins: 171
    • Regular Season Losses: 229
    • Regular Season Ties: 83
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 67
    • Regular Season GAA: 2.27
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 11
    • Playoff Wins: 3
    • Playoff Losses: 6
    • Playoff Ties: 2
    • Playoff Shutouts: 3
    • Playoff GAA: 2.09
    • -
    • Hart Trophy (1929)
    • Vezina Trophy (1931)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1932, 1934)

    Worters has a very interesting set of stats. On one hand, he has a losing record, accumulating 58 more losses than wins. However, he also has posted a very impressive 67 shutouts, meaning he recorded a shutout almost every seven games. His goals against average of 2.27 is also very impressive, while his playoff GAA is even better at 2.09.

    Worters was nicknamed "Shrimp" due to his incredibly small frame, clocking in at 135 pounds and a not-so-staggering height of 5'3".

45. Charlie Simmer, LW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 712
    • Regular Season Goals: 342
    • Regular Season Assists: 369
    • Regular Season Points: 711
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 24
    • Playoff Goals: 9
    • Playoff Assists: 9
    • Playoff Points: 18
    • -
    • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1986)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1980, 1981)

    Charlie Simmer, a sniper, played at a pace of almost a point per game in his NHL days. He also posted an impressive career total of plus-113.

    Simmer made up one-third of the "Triple Crown" line when he played for the Los Angeles Kings. The rest of that line will be featured further up in this list.

    Simmer suited up for the California Golden Seals, Cleveland Barons, Los Angeles Kings, Boston Bruins and Pittsburgh Penguins in his shortened career. Injuries were responsible for the fact that he only played 700 games in the NHL.

44. Mark Howe, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 929
    • Regular Season Goals: 197
    • Regular Season Assists: 545
    • Regular Season Points: 742
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 101
    • Playoff Goals: 10
    • Playoff Assists: 51
    • Playoff Points: 61
    • -
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1983, 1986, 1987)

    Although Howe was a great defenceman, he will always be known as the guy that got impaled by a hockey net in an injury that almost ended his career.

    While crashing the net, Howe slid into the pointed center of the net, which cut him, leaving a five-inch gash in his upper thigh. He lost 35 pounds while recovering, largely due to the liquid diet he needed in order to avoid infection.

    Howe played for the Hartford Whalers, Philadelphia Flyers and Detroit Red Wings, but his best years came in Philly.

43. Mike Liut, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 664
    • Regular Season Wins: 294
    • Regular Season Losses: 271
    • Regular Season Ties: 74
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 25
    • Regular Season GAA: 3.48
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 76
    • Playoff Wins: 29
    • Playoff Losses: 32
    • Playoff Ties: -
    • Playoff Shutouts: 2
    • Playoff GAA: 3.38
    • -
    • Lester B. Pearson Award (1981)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1981)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1987)

    With the exception of a few fantastic seasons, Liut could often be described simply as a decent goaltender. His decent stats, decent game and decent teams are all proof of his, well, decency.

    However, those exceptions are responsible for Liut's placement on this list above players like Simmer and Howe.

    Both his rookie and sophomore seasons were impressive, as he racked up 71 wins over that time span. 

42. Rene Robert, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 744
    • Regular Season Goals: 284
    • Regular Season Assists: 418
    • Regular Season Points: 702
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 50
    • Playoff Goals: 22
    • Playoff Assists: 19
    • Playoff Points: 41
    • -
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1975)

    Robert was your typical good hockey player. He was quite fast and had a bit of a nose for the net, which he proved with a couple of 40-goal seasons.

    On top of that, Rene also posted two 30-goal seasons and four 20-goal seasons.

    Robert made up one piece of the "French Connection Line" as a part of the Buffalo Sabres. The other two pieces also appear on this list.

    Robert had the chance to win a Cup in 1975 when his Sabres made the Finals, but they lost the series to the Flyers.

41. Peter Bondra, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1081
    • Regular Season Goals: 503
    • Regular Season Assists: 389
    • Regular Season Points: 892
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 80
    • Playoff Goals: 30
    • Playoff Assists: 26
    • Playoff Points: 56

    Bondra was one of the NHL's top snipers of the 1990s. Twice he scored 52 goals in a season, as well as adding a 46-goal and a 45-goal season. He was the 37th NHL player to score 500 goals.

    His exceptional talent is shown in the six Washington Capitals records he's achieved. The records for most goals as a Capital (472), most points (825), most power-play goals (137), most short-handed goals (32), most game-winning goals (32), and most hat tricks (19) are all written under his name.

    Bondra was voted by fans as the second best player in franchise history. Goaltender Olaf Kolzig beat Bondra for first place by a mere 20 votes.

    Bondra had a chance at Lord Stanley's Cup in 1998, when the Capitals made it to the Finals, only to be swept by the Red Wings.

40. John Vanbiesbrouck, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 882
    • Regular Season Wins: 374
    • Regular Season Losses: 346
    • Regular Season Ties: 119
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 40
    • Regular Season GAA: 2.98
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 71
    • Playoff Wins: 28
    • Playoff Losses: 38
    • Playoff Ties: -
    • Playoff Shutouts: 5
    • Playoff GAA: 2.68
    • -
    • Vezina Trophy (1986)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1986)

    Throughout his career, Vanbiesbrouck played for the New York Rangers, Florida Panthers, Philadelphia Flyers, New York Islanders and New Jersey Devils.

    After being selected by the Panthers in the expansion draft, John thrived in Florida. In 1996, he led the Panthers to their only Stanley Cup Finals appearance in franchise history. Unfortunately, the team was swept by the Colorado Avalanche.

39. Dale Hunter, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1407
    • Regular Season Goals: 323
    • Regular Season Assists: 697
    • Regular Season Points: 1020
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 186
    • Playoff Goals: 42
    • Playoff Assists: 76
    • Playoff Points: 118

    Dale Hunter, while a great point producer, is remembered for receiving a 21-game suspension on a late hit from behind on forward Pierre Turgeon. This is just one incident that contributed to Hunter's "dirty player" reputation.

    Hunter is currently the only player in National Hockey League history to rack up 1,000 points and 3,000 penalty minutes (1,020 points, 3,565 penalty minutes.)

    Strangely enough, Hunter competed in 186 playoff games during his 20-year career. You would think that amidst that many games, there would have been a string of wins somewhere that led to a Cup.

    I thought so too. Looks like we were both wrong.

38. Rick Vaive, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 876
    • Regular Season Goals: 441
    • Regular Season Assists: 347
    • Regular Season Points: 788
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 54
    • Playoff Goals: 27
    • Playoff Assists: 16
    • Playoff Points: 43

    Rick Vaive is one of the top snipers in Maple Leaf history. He became the first Maple Leaf to score 50 goals in a season in 1982, when he posted 54. He went on to record 50 goals in the two following campaigns.

    Vaive played for the Sabres, Blackhawks, Maple Leafs and Canucks during his career. He was much less successful after being traded from the Leafs.

37. Rick Martin, LW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 685
    • Regular Season Goals: 384
    • Regular Season Assists: 317
    • Regular Season Points: 701
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 63
    • Playoff Goals: 24
    • Playoff Assists: 29
    • Playoff Points: 53
    • -
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1974, 1975)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1976, 1977)

    Rick Martin was the second piece of the extremely successful "French Connection Line." Unfortunately, his career was cut short by a chronic back injury.

    We will never know just how good Martin could have been had he not been bitten by the injury bug. Many believe he could have continued to become one of the better scorers in league history.

36. Curtis Joseph, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 943
    • Regular Season Wins: 454
    • Regular Season Losses: 352
    • Regular Season Ties: 90
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 51
    • Regular Season GAA: 2.79
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 133
    • Playoff Wins: 63
    • Playoff Losses: 66
    • Playoff Ties: -
    • Playoff Shutouts: 16
    • Playoff GAA: 2.42
    • -
    • King Clancy Memorial Trophy (2000)

    Curtis Joseph is probably the best playoff performer on this entire list. He was renowned for being a good goaltender in the regular season, but a fantastic goaltender in the playoffs. He actually owns the record for most wins by a goaltender without a Stanley Cup ring.

    Joseph found the nickname "CuJo" for the obvious name-related reasons, and because of the snarling beast on his mask which was inspired by the Stephen King novel Cujo.

35. Dave Taylor, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1111
    • Regular Season Goals: 431
    • Regular Season Assists: 638
    • Regular Season Points: 1069
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 92
    • Playoff Goals: 26
    • Playoff Assists: 33
    • Playoff Points: 59
    • -
    • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1991)
    • King Clancy Memorial Trophy (1991)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1981)

    Dave Taylor spent his entire carer with the Los Angeles Kings, and holds the record for games played with 1,111. During that time, Taylor steadily posted impressive point totals, including 112-point and 106-point seasons.

    Taylor made up the second part of the "Triple Crown" line.

34. Trevor Linden, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1382
    • Regular Season Goals: 375
    • Regular Season Assists: 492
    • Regular Season Points: 867
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 124
    • Playoff Goals: 34
    • Playoff Assists: 65
    • Playoff Points: 99
    • -
    • King Clancy Memorial Trophy (1997)
    • NHL All-Rookie Team (1989)

    Trevor Linden was a decent point producer and played his heart out every night, but above all, he was known because of his excellent leadership. He was named captain of the Vancouver Canucks at the tender age of 21, and soon after he earned the nickname "Captain Canuck." The team recognized his leadership by retiring his number 16.

    That same leadership is what eventually led to him becoming the President of the National Hockey League Player's Association (NHLPA).

    Linden led the Canucks to within one game of a Stanley Cup win in 1994, with the New York Rangers ultimately winning the series. 

    The 19-year veteran retired on June 11, 2008, exactly 20 years after he was drafted.

33. Wendel Clark, LW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 793
    • Regular Season Goals: 330
    • Regular Season Assists: 234
    • Regular Season Points: 564
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 95
    • Playoff Goals: 37
    • Playoff Assists: 32
    • Playoff Points: 69
    • -
    • NHL All-Rookie Team (1986)

    Wendel Clark is often referred to as the most popular Maple Leaf of all time. Fans fell in love with his rough and tumble style of hockey. Besides that, Clark was also nicknamed "Captain Crunch" for that same physical play.

    However, that wasn't the only lovable aspect of his game. Clark was also a solid point producer. He proved his scoring capabilities in the 1994 campaign by posting 46 goals in 64 games.

    Unfortunately, his physical game resulted in numerous injuries, causing Clark to only play one full season in his NHL career.

32. Roger Crozier, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 518
    • Regular Season Wins: 206
    • Regular Season Losses: 197
    • Regular Season Ties: 70
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 30
    • Regular Season GAA: 3.03
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 32
    • Playoff Wins: 14
    • Playoff Losses: 16
    • Playoff Ties: -
    • Playoff Shutouts: 1
    • Playoff GAA: 2.75
    • -
    • Conn Smythe Trophy (1966)
    • Calder Memorial Trophy (1965)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1965)

    Crozier was the first ever player to win the Conn Smythe Trophy despite playing for the losing Stanley Cup team. He captured this award while playing with the Red Wings, before being taken in the expansion draft by the Buffalo Sabres.

    In 2000, the NHL unveiled the Roger Crozier Trophy, which is awarded to the goaltender who posts the best save percentage every year.

31. Tim Kerr, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 655
    • Regular Season Goals: 370
    • Regular Season Assists: 304
    • Regular Season Points: 674
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 81
    • Playoff Goals: 40
    • Playoff Assists: 31
    • Playoff Points: 71
    • -
    • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1989)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1987)

    Tim Kerr is the perfect example of how injuries can ruin a picture-perfect career.

    Kerr only played 13 NHL seasons due to a nagging shoulder that required five operations in a 14-month period. However, Kerr made the best out of those 13 seasons, scoring more than 50 goals four campaigns in a row.

    Kerr was the master of the "garbage" goal. He picked his spots perfectly and stood in all the right places.

    The undrafted forward set the single-season record for most power-play goals in 1986 with 34. He would have made it higher on this list had he played for longer.

30. Rod Gilbert, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1065
    • Regular Season Goals: 406
    • Regular Season Assists: 615
    • Regular Season Points: 1021
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 79
    • Playoff Goals: 34
    • Playoff Assists: 33
    • Playoff Points: 67
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (1982)
    • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1976)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1972)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1968)

    Gilbert was known as a steady scorer in his days. A member of the "GAG" line (goal a game), Gilbert spent his entire career with the New York Rangers, and currently works with them. Vic Hadfield, and another player who will later be featured on this list, were the other two pieces of the GAG line.

    Gilbert made it to the finals in 1972, but his Rangers were disappointed by the Boston Bruins and lost the series.

29. Ron Hextall, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 608
    • Regular Season Wins: 296
    • Regular Season Losses: 214
    • Regular Season Ties: 69
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 23
    • Regular Season GAA: 2.97
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 93
    • Playoff Wins: 47
    • Playoff Losses: 43
    • Playoff Ties: -
    • Playoff Shutouts: 2
    • Playoff GAA: 3.03
    • -
    • Conn Smythe Trophy (1987)
    • Vezina Trophy (1987)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1987)
    • NHL All-Rookie Team (1987)

    Ron Hextall is a very well-known goaltender for both his goaltending skills and the strange occurrences he always seemed to run into during his playing career.

    Firstly, Hextall was the fourth player ever to win the Conn Smythe trophy despite playing for the losing Stanley Cup team. The first player was the aforementioned Roger Crozier.

    Next, Hextall was also the first NHL goalie to ever score a goal. He would go on to score another, and then another in playoff action.

    The last occurrence is likely the most well-known. Hextall has been in numerous fights, including bouts with Chris Chelios and Felix Potvin.

    Hextall posted above-average numbers in his career and has an impressive trophy collection.

28. Ed Giacomin, G

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 609
    • Regular Season Wins: 289
    • Regular Season Losses: 209
    • Regular Season Ties: 96
    • Regular Season Shutouts: 54
    • Regular Season GAA: 2.82
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 65
    • Playoff Wins: 29
    • Playoff Losses: 35
    • Playoff Ties: -
    • Playoff Shutouts: 1
    • Playoff GAA: 2.81
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (1987)
    • Vezina Trophy (1971)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1967, 1971)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1968, 1969, 1970)

    Eddie Giacomin was another one of those players that was essentially loved by everybody, especially loyal Ranger fans. He spent over 500 games, the majority of his career, in New York.

    Giacomin's story is one of grit and determination. After suffering third-degree burns in a kitchen fire, he was told he would never play hockey professionally. However, after a year of recovery, Giacomin fought back into the hockey scene, eventually getting a goaltending job in Washington. And as they say, the rest is history.

    Giacomin helped lead the Rangers to the Cup Finals in 1972, but they lost to the Bruins in six games.

27. Keith Tkachuk, LW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1201
    • Regular Season Goals: 538
    • Regular Season Assists: 527
    • Regular Season Points: 1065
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 89
    • Playoff Goals: 28
    • Playoff Assists: 28
    • Playoff Points: 56
    • -
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1995, 1998)

    Keith Tkachuk only retired recently, and he played in the NHL last year as a member of the St. Louis Blues. As well as the Blues, Tkachuk also played for the Atlanta Thrashers, Phoenix Coyotes and Winnipeg Jets in his 19-year career.

    Keith was known as a solid power forward, boasting a physical, yet offensive game. He holds the honour of being one of only four American players in history to score 500 career NHL goals.

26. Brian Propp, LW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1016
    • Regular Season Goals: 425
    • Regular Season Assists: 579
    • Regular Season Points: 1004
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 160
    • Playoff Goals: 64
    • Playoff Assists: 84
    • Playoff Points: 148

    Ahh, poor Brian Propp. The poor guy made it to the Stanley Cup Finals five times, and didn't leave the arena with a victory once. The first three visits came with the Philadelphia Flyers in 1980, 1985 and 1987. The fourth came with the Boston Bruins in 1990, and the last came with the Minnesota North Stars in 1991.

    Propp operated at what was virtually a point-per-game pace. He was a very complete player who always posted respectable point totals, but never once cracked the 100-point mark. He registered 97 points twice, in 1985 and 1986.

25. Bernie Nicholls, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1127
    • Regular Season Goals: 475
    • Regular Season Assists: 734
    • Regular Season Points: 1209
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 118
    • Playoff Goals: 42
    • Playoff Assists: 72
    • Playoff Points: 114

    The first half of Bernie Nicholls' career was very much oriented around his goal-scoring abilities. In 1989, Nicholls' scored 70 goals, enough to put him at a tie for 12th on the all-time list of most goals per season. That year, he posted an exceptional 150 points in 79 games.

    However, after '89, Nicholls' production dropped greatly, and he would only top 60 points once more by the end of his career.

24. Doug Wilson, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1024
    • Regular Season Goals: 237
    • Regular Season Assists: 590
    • Regular Season Points: 827
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 95
    • Playoff Goals: 19
    • Playoff Assists: 61
    • Playoff Points: 80
    • -
    • James Norris Trophy (1982)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1982)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1985, 1990)

    Doug Wilson was simply a very good blueliner. His fluid style of play, his goal-scoring ability, consistent point production and leadership were all qualities that gave Wilson the title of elite defender in his time.

    In 1988, Wilson endured a debilitating shoulder injury that required extensive surgery. At one point, doctors even wondered if Wilson would ever play hockey again.

    Wilson never made it to the Stanley Cup Finals, but made it to the conference finals three times with the Chicago Blackhawks.

23. Borje Salming, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1148 
    • Regular Season Goals: 150 
    • Regular Season Assists: 637 
    • Regular Season Points: 787
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 81 
    • Playoff Goals: 12 
    • Playoff Assists: 37 
    • Playoff Points: 49
    • -
    • Hockey Fall of Fame Inductee (1996)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1977)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1975, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1980)

    Salming spent nearly his entire career with the Toronto Maple Leafs, playing his final year in Detroit. In his time with the Leafs, he was always a fan favourite. During the 1976 Canada Cup, when his Team Sweden played the United States in Maple Leaf Gardens, the Canadian fans gave Salming a standing ovation.

    After the game, Salming stated that "sometimes hockey has no country."

    Salming was one of the best defencemen of the 1970s. He never really came close to winning a Stanley Cup.

22. Pavel Bure, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 702
    • Regular Season Goals: 437
    • Regular Season Assists: 342
    • Regular Season Points: 779
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 64
    • Playoff Goals: 35
    • Playoff Assists: 35
    • Playoff Points: 70
    • -
    • Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophy (2000, 2001)
    • Calder Memorial Trophy (1992)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1994)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (2000, 2001)

    Pavel Bure was one of the best pure goal scorers the NHL has ever witnessed. Unfortunately, a nagging knee injury forced him to retire after just 13 seasons. It's scary to think about how good Bure would have been if his knee problems were non-existant.

    Bure ventured to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1994 with the Canucks, only to lose to the New York Rangers in seven games.

21. Markus Naslund, LW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1117
    • Regular Season Goals: 395
    • Regular Season Assists: 474
    • Regular Season Points: 869
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 52
    • Playoff Goals: 14
    • Playoff Assists: 22
    • Playoff Points: 36
    • -
    • Lester B. Pearson Trophy (2003)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (2002, 2003, 2004)

    Although he spent the last few years of his career with other teams, Markus Naslund will always be remembered as the leader of the Vancouver Canucks, on and off the ice. That leadership is partially why Markus is ranked so high.

    "Nazzy's" best season came in 2002-03, when he posted 48 goals and 104 points, the year he received the Lester B. Pearson Trophy.

20. Pierre Turgeon, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1294
    • Regular Season Goals: 515
    • Regular Season Assists: 812
    • Regular Season Points: 1327
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 109
    • Playoff Goals: 35
    • Playoff Assists: 62
    • Playoff Points: 97
    • -
    • Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (1993)

    Pierre Turgeon quickly and quietly formed himself into one of the most talented players of his time. The highest penalty minute total he ever amassed in one season was 44.

    Turgeon was a classy player, which can be observed by the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy he was awarded. He just quietly went about his business and played his game of hockey.

    Turgeon never really got a shot at a Stanley Cup. He arrived in Montreal two years after they won the cup.

19. Phil Housley, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1495
    • Regular Season Goals: 338
    • Regular Season Assists: 894
    • Regular Season Points: 1232
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 85
    • Playoff Goals: 13
    • Playoff Assists: 43
    • Playoff Points: 56
    • -
    • NHL All-Rookie Team (1983)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1992)

    In 21 career NHL seasons, defencemen Phil Housley was only able to make the Stanley Cup Finals once, with the Washington Capitals in 1998. Besides that, he never could find playoff success with any of his eight different teams.

    Housley was one of the premier offensive defencemen in his time. His best offensive season came in 1993, when he posted 18 goals and 79 assists for 97 points.

18. Cam Neely, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 726
    • Regular Season Goals: 395
    • Regular Season Assists: 299
    • Regular Season Points: 694
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 93
    • Playoff Goals: 57
    • Playoff Assists: 32
    • Playoff Points: 89
    • -
    • Hockey Fall of Fame Inductee (2005)

    Cam Neely is ultimately the man who invented the power forward. His physical, "go to the net" attitude paved the way for the power forwards of today. He posted 1,241 penalty minutes and scored 50 or more goals three times in his career, but those totals came at a price. Neely only played 13 seasons in the NHL due to a persistent knee injury, which derived from this intense play style.

    Cam made the Finals twice, in 1988 and 1990, both against the Oilers.

17. Jeremy Roenick, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1363
    • Regular Season Goals: 513
    • Regular Season Assists: 703
    • Regular Season Points: 1216
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 154
    • Playoff Goals: 53
    • Playoff Assists: 69
    • Playoff Points: 122

    You could always count on Jeremy Roenick to be interesting. It seemed as though every little thing he did was either weird, funny, controversial or offensive.

    Throughout his career, Roenick recorded stellar offensive numbers, including a career plus-minus of plus-153. He has also racked up 1,463 career penalty minutes. He was the third American in history to record 500 career NHL goals.

    Roenick missed his opportunity at a cup win in his stint in the 1992 Finals with the Chicago Blackhawks.

16. Darryl Sittler, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1096
    • Regular Season Goals: 484
    • Regular Season Assists: 637
    • Regular Season Points: 1121
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 76
    • Playoff Goals: 29
    • Playoff Assists: 45
    • Playoff Points: 74
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (1989)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1978)

    It wouldn't take a genius to see that Sittler probably never captured the elusive Stanley Cup. Most average people could look at his career stats, notice that he played the majority of his games with the Toronto Maple Leafs, and use that to judge the likeliness of a Stanley Cup win.

    Long story short, because he played for the Maple Leafs most of his career, his chances of winning were drastically slimmed, due to their 43-year Stanley Cup drought. 

    Sittler holds the record for most points in a game, notching six goals and four assists against the Boston Bruins on February 7, 1976.

15. Eric Lindros, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 760
    • Regular Season Goals: 372
    • Regular Season Assists: 493
    • Regular Season Points: 865
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 53
    • Playoff Goals: 24
    • Playoff Assists: 33
    • Playoff Points: 57
    • -
    • Lester B. Pearson Award (1995)
    • Hart Memorial Trophy (1995)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1995)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1996)
    • NHL All-Rookie Team (1993)

    Eric Lindros' career could have been much better had he not suffered the concussion issues he did. Subsequently, he would be ranked a lot higher had he not been injury-ridden.

    Eric was bit by the injury bug that often bites power fowards. His physical, nard-nosed style of play was fantastic until it became responsible for the collapse of his career.

    "Big E" actually found the Finals in 1997, only to have his Flyers lose.

14. Dino Ciccarelli, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1232
    • Regular Season Goals: 608
    • Regular Season Assists: 592
    • Regular Season Points: 1200
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 141
    • Playoff Goals: 73
    • Playoff Assists: 45
    • Playoff Points: 118
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (2010)

    Dino Ciccarelli didn't have the best luck in the playoffs. Twice he battled his way to the Finals and lost, and once he was traded right before his former team won the cup.

    Past his bad playoff luck, Dino's career was a great one. In his first full season, he posted 55 goals and 51 assists for 106 points. He went on to one more 50+ goal season, as well as multiple 40+ goal seasons.

    Ciccarelli was a gritty forward, who often set up camp right in front of the opposing goalie's net.

13. Bernie Federko, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1000
    • Regular Season Goals: 369
    • Regular Season Assists: 761
    • Regular Season Points: 1130
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 91
    • Playoff Goals: 35
    • Playoff Assists: 66
    • Playoff Points: 101
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (2002)

    Among the stars on this list, Bernie Federko is relatively unknown. However, that doesn't change the fact that he topped 100 points four times in his 13-year career.

    Federko, flat out, was just plain great. He was one of the most underrated players of his time period.

    Poor Bernie, he never did make it to the Stanley Cup Finals.

12. Mike Gartner, RW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1432
    • Regular Season Goals: 708
    • Regular Season Assists: 627
    • Regular Season Points: 1335
    • Playoff Games: 122
    • Playoff Goals: 43
    • Playoff Assists: 50
    • Playoff Points: 90
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (2001)

    Mike Gartner's blistering speed and shot were both contributors in shaping him into one of the league's top goal-scorers in history.

    Although he only reached the 50-goal mark once in his career, Gartner consistently put up competitive numbers each and every year.

    Gartner suited up for the Washington Capitals, Minnesota North Stars, New York Rangers, Toronto Maple Leafs and Phoenix Coyotes in his career, spending the majority of his time with the Caps.

    Gartner has a strange distinction. He is the only Hockey Hall of Fame inductee to never win a Stanley Cup or play in the Cup Finals, win an NHL award or be named to a postseason All-Star team.

11. Adam Oates, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1337
    • Regular Season Goals: 341
    • Regular Season Assists: 1079
    • Regular Season Points: 1420
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 163
    • Playoff Goals: 42
    • Playoff Assists: 114
    • Playoff Points: 156
    • -
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1991)

    Adam Oates was one of the best pure playmakers in the entire league. His passes could rival the passes of Gretzky and Lemieux. If you needed a guy to get the puck to another guy, Oates was your man.

    Oates played for the Red Wings, Blues, Bruins, Capitals, Flyers, Ducks and Oilers, with his best years taking place with Boston. His best year offensively came in 1993, which saw him tally 45 goals and 97 assists for 142 points.

10. Mats Sundin, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1346
    • Regular Season Goals: 564
    • Regular Season Assists: 785
    • Regular Season Points: 1349
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 91
    • Playoff Goals: 38
    • Playoff Assists: 44
    • Playoff Points: 82
    • -
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (2002, 2004)
    • Mark Messier Leadership Award (2008)

    Many people argue that Mats Sundin was the best Maple Leaf in franchise history. He is currently the team's all-time leader in goals (420) and points (984), as well as contributing consistently every year. With the exception of his rookie campaign, the lockout-shortened year, and his half-year spent with Vancouver, Sundin played in at least 70 games and posted at least 70 points every year. Now that, ladies and gentlemen, is consistency.

    Mats' Swedish heritage has led to numerous records. He was the first Swedish player to reach 500 career NHL goals, and holds the record for the longest serving non-North American captain.

    Sundin never had the chance to compete for the Stanley Cup. The farthest he got was the Conference Finals in 1998-99, and the Leafs lost the series to the Sabres in five games.

9. Michel Goulet, LW

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1089
    • Regular Season Goals: 548
    • Regular Season Assists: 604
    • Regular Season Points: 1152
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 92
    • Playoff Goals: 39
    • Playoff Assists: 39
    • Playoff Points: 78
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (1998)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1984, 1986, 1987)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1983, 1988)

    Michel Goulet was a bona fide scorer. In the 1980s, he put together a string of seven consecutive 40+ goal seasons. He managed to score at least 20 goals in every year he played, with the exception of his final year. He also tallied an impressive plus-97 over the duration of his career.

    Goulet played for the Quebec Nordiques, Chicago Blackhawks and Birmingham Bulls during his 15-year career. His best chance at a Cup came in 1992, while he was a part of the Blackhawks. Chicago ended up being swept by Pittsburgh.

8. Norm Ullman, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1410
    • Regular Season Goals: 490
    • Regular Season Assists: 739
    • Regular Season Points: 1229
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 106
    • Playoff Goals: 30
    • Playoff Assists: 53
    • Playoff Points: 83
    • -
    • Hockey Hall Fame Inductee (1982)
    • First All-Star Team Centre (1965) 
    • Second All-Star Team Centre (1967)


    Norm Ullman was known for his consistant contribution to the team as well as his durability. In a 10-year span, Ullman only missed 21 games. He recorded 16 seasons in which he scored at least 20 goals.

    Norm was also a very strong player. He was often the guy digging the puck out of the corner and doing the dirty work along the boards.

    Ullman was a master of the ever-popular “give and go” play. In fact, he was one of the pioneers.

    Ullman, similar to Brian Propp, was also very unlucky when it came to the Stanley Cup Finals. He made it there five times in his 21-year career as a Detroit Red Wing, but never came out of the series with a win.

7. Jean Ratelle, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1281
    • Regular Season Goals: 491
    • Regular Season Assists: 776
    • Regular Season Points: 1267
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 123
    • Playoff Goals: 32
    • Playoff Assists: 66
    • Playoff Points: 98
    • -
    • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1971) 
    • Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (1972, 1976) 
    • Lester B. Pearson Award (1972) 
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1972) 
    • Hockey Hall Fame Inductee (1985)

    Jean Ratelle was another very underrated, classy player. It is often said that his name is overlooked when discussing the best players in the game, simply because he was so good that his talent became commonplace.

    Ratelle was the final piece of the previously mentioned "GAG" line in New York, which also included Vic Hadfield and Rod Gilbert.

    Ratelle spent 22 years chasing the Stanley Cup, and came within arms reach of it three times, once with the Rangers and twice with the Bruins.

6. Dale Hawerchuk, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1188
    • Regular Season Goals: 518
    • Regular Season Assists: 891
    • Regular Season Points: 1409
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 97
    • Playoff Goals: 30
    • Playoff Assists: 69
    • Playoff Points: 99
    • -
    • Hockey Hall Fame Inductee (2001)
    • Calder Memorial Trophy (1982) 
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1985) 

    Dale Hawerchuk was a point-producing machine. He posted six 100+ point seasons and six 40+ goal seasons in his first seven years of NHL hockey.

    Hawerchuk operated at well over a point-per-game pace. Unfortunately, he was never lucky enough to play for a good team, and therefore never got the chance to compete for the Stanley Cup.

5. Pat LaFontaine, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 865
    • Regular Season Goals: 468
    • Regular Season Assists: 545
    • Regular Season Points: 1013
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 69
    • Playoff Goals: 26
    • Playoff Assists: 36
    • Playoff Points: 62
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (2003)
    • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1995)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1993)

    Pat LaFontaine played for the New York Islanders, Buffalo Sabres and New York Rangers throughout his career, with Buffalo being the setting for his most memorable years. Unfortunately, his stint with the Islanders began right at the end of the franchise’s dynasty, joining the team right after their fourth consecutive Cup win. He would still make it to the finals in his first year as an Islander, but that would be the last time.

    Unfortunately, LaFontaine’s career was shortened due to a knee injury.

4. Peter Stastny, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 977
    • Regular Season Goals: 450
    • Regular Season Assists: 789
    • Regular Season Points: 1239
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 93
    • Playoff Goals: 33
    • Playoff Assists: 72
    • Playoff Points: 105
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (1998)
    • Calder Memorial Trophy (1981)

    Peter Stastny, or “Peter the Great”, was a very effective player and point producer. In fact, the only player who had more points than him in the 1980s was Wayne Gretzky himself.

    Stastny played for the Blues, Devils and Nordiques in his 16-year career. Ultimately, he never reached the finals with any of those teams.

3. Gilbert Perrault, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1191
    • Regular Season Goals: 512
    • Regular Season Assists: 814
    • Regular Season Points: 1326
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 90
    • Playoff Goals: 33
    • Playoff Assists: 70
    • Playoff Points: 103
    • -
    • Hockey Hall Fame Inductee (1990)
    • Calder Memorial Trophy (1971) 
    • Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (1973) 
    • Second All-Star Team Centre (1976, 1977) 

    Gilbert Perreault was one of the most gifted centermen in NHL history. He was known for his beautiful stickhandling and exceptional hockey skill.

    Perreault made up the final piece of the genius “French Connection” line in Buffalo. All three line members made this list, with him being placed the highest.

    Perreault had his chance at Stanley Cup glory in 1975 with the Sabres, but the Philadelphia Flyers took the series in six games.

2. Brad Park, D

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1113
    • Regular Season Goals: 213
    • Regular Season Assists: 683
    • Regular Season Points: 896
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 161
    • Playoff Goals: 35
    • Playoff Assists: 90
    • Playoff Points: 125
    • -
    • Hockey Hall Fame Inductee (1988)
    • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1984) 
    • First All-Star Team Defense (1970, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1978) 
    • Second All-Star Team Defense (1971, 1973) 

    In conversations about the best defencemen in NHL history, Brad Park is often forgotten about, due to the presence of more recognizable names such as Orr, Bourque and Coffey. However, Park was indeed one of the most talented blueliners the game has ever witnessed, and his abilities are rather underrated. Oddly enough, Park never won the Norris.

    Brad led his Rangers to the Finals in 1972 and his Bruins in 1977 and 1978, but all three series ended in losses for Park’s team.

    Park played 18 career NHL seasons.

1. Marcel Dionne, C

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    Career Achievements

    • Regular Season Games: 1348
    • Regular Season Goals: 731
    • Regular Season Assists: 1040
    • Regular Season Points: 1771
    • -
    • Playoff Games: 49
    • Playoff Goals: 21
    • Playoff Assists: 24
    • Playoff Points: 45
    • -
    • Hockey Hall of Fame Inductee (1992)
    • Art Ross Trophy (1980)
    • Lester B. Pearson Award (1979, 1980)
    • Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (1975, 1977)
    • NHL First All-Star Team (1977, 1980)
    • NHL Second All-Star Team (1979, 1981)

    Who else did you expect it to be?

    Marcel “Little Beaver” Dionne is easily the best player to never win a Stanley Cup. With point totals such as 107, 117, 121, 122, 126, 130, 135 and 137, his offensive dominance is too much to ignore.

    Dionne posted ten 40+ goal seasons in his career, as well as numerous 30 goal seasons. The guy was a scoring machine.

    However, despite his obvious talent, he never even competed in the Finals. 

    Dionne was the third and final part of the “Triple Crown” line on the Kings. The remaining two parts also made this list.

    In his 19-year career, Marcel suited up for the Red Wings, Kings and Rangers.

    Follow me on Twitter! @NHLKaelan