Report: Young NBA Stars Discussing Insurance Policies as Protection vs. Injuries

Adam Wells@adamwells1985Featured ColumnistJune 13, 2020

Boston Celtics guard Jayson Tatum plays against the Minnesota Timberwolves during an NBA basketball game Friday, Feb. 21, 2020, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Andy Clayton-King/Associated Press

Several of the NBA's best young players have reportedly discussed asking the league to finance insurance policies to protect them against long-term or career-threatening injuries when the season resumes in Orlando. 

Per ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski, Bam Adebayo (Miami Heat)De'Aaron Fox (Sacramento Kings), Kyle Kuzma (Los Angeles Lakers)Donovan Mitchell (Utah Jazz) and Jayson Tatum (Boston Celtics) held a call to discuss the matter with NBPA executive director Michele Roberts and senior counsel Ron Klempner on Friday. 

There are "intensified concerns" about the increased potential for injury following a long layoff and rushed training camp leading into regular-season games, which Wojnarowski has reported are tentatively scheduled to start July 30. 

Wojnarowski did note the league and union have "engaged on the possibility of protections for players in the event of serious COVID-19 illnesses or career-threatening injuries suffered in Orlando."

Each of the five players mentioned on the call were all 2017 draftees who will be eligible for contract extensions this offseason. 

Sources told Wojnarowski that insurance policies for players worth potentially $100 million or more "could cost in the neighborhood of $500,000 to protect against the financial loss of a career-ending injury."

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There have reportedly been a number of growing concerns from players about the NBA's restart plan. B/R's Howard Beck reported players "want more freedom of movement" in Orlando. 

Per Wojnarowski, one anonymous player suggested that once games resume, the conversation in this country "will turn from systemic racism to who did what in the game last night."

The NBA board of governors approved the league's 22-team restart plan in a vote held on June 4, with NBPA representatives approving it the following day.