Andy Murray Says He May Retire at Wimbledon Because of Pain from Hip Injury

Kyle Newport@@KyleNewportFeatured ColumnistJanuary 11, 2019

Andy Murray of Great Britain breaks down during a press conference in Melbourne on January 11, 2019, ahead of the Australian Open tennis tournament. - Injury-plagued former world number one Murray on January 11, 2019 said he is set to retire this year and hopes to make it till Wimbledon, but conceded the Australian Open could be his last event. (Photo by William WEST / AFP) / -- IMAGE RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - STRICTLY NO COMMERCIAL USE --        (Photo credit should read WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)
WILLIAM WEST/Getty Images

The 2019 Wimbledon could mark the end of an era. 

Per The Times' Stuart Fraser, Andy Murray may retire after this year's Wimbledon as he continues to battle a hip injury.

"Wimbledon is where I would like to stop playing but I am not certain I am able to do that," Murray said on Thursday, per Fraser. "I'm not sure I can play through the pain for another four or five months. I can play with limitations. But having the limitations and the pain is not allowing me to enjoy competing or training."

Having dealt with the injury since 2008, he underwent hip surgery in January 2018. That procedure ultimately caused him to miss the 2018 Wimbledon.

And while he has his sights set on Wimbledon, the 31-year-old acknowledged that he could be playing in his final tournament this month.

"Pretty much done everything that I could to try and get my hip feeling better and it hasn't helped loads," Murray said on Thursday, per the Australian Open. "I think there is a chance the Australian Open is my last tournament."

According to the Herald Sun Sport, Murray was in tears when talking about retirement:

Fraser noted that Murray has ruled out prolonging his career as a doubles player.

If this is the end of the road for Murray, it's been quite the journey.

Murray has three career singles major titles to his name, winning at both the U.S. Open (2012) and Wimbledon (2013 and 2016). With his victory in 2013, he became the first British player to win the men's singles title at Wimbledon in 77 years.

And while he hasn't been able to complete the career Grand Slam, he has had plenty of success at the other major tournaments. He has made it to the Australian Open finals five times in his career and made it to the French Open final in 2016.

Murray is 663-190 in his career, winning 45 titles and earning more than $61 million in prize money. He reached the world No. 1 ranking back in November 2016.

For now, it appears as though Murray will have to play things by ear. He is set to open his Australian Open play with a first-round match against No. 22 Roberto Bautista Agut on Sunday.

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