Maya Moore Will Sit Out 2020 WNBA Season to Focus on Criminal Justice Reform

Joseph Zucker@@JosephZuckerFeatured ColumnistJanuary 22, 2020

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - AUGUST 14:  Maya Moore #23 of the Minnesota Lynx handles the ball against the Chicago Sky on August 14, 2018 at Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2018 NBAE (Photo by Jordan Johnson/NBAE via Getty Images)
Jordan Johnson/Getty Images

Maya Moore will miss her second straight WNBA season in 2020.

According to the New York Times' Kurt Streeter, the Minnesota Lynx star plans to sit out "so she can continue to push for criminal justice reform and the release of Jonathan Irons, a man she believes is innocent of the crime for which he was sentenced to prison."

Moore told Streeter: "I'm in a really good place right now with my life, and I don't want to change anything. Basketball has not been foremost in my mind. I've been able to rest, and connect with people around me, actually be in their presence after all of these years on the road. And I've been able to be there for Jonathan."

Lynx head coach and general manager Cheryl Reeve issued a statement about the development.

"Over the last year we have been in frequent contact with Maya around the great work in criminal justice reform and ministry in which she is fully engaged," she said. "We are proud of the ways that Maya is advocating for justice and using her platform to impact social change."

Moore first announced on the Players' Tribune last February she wasn't going to suit up for the Lynx in 2019. She told Streeter in June that she had become focused on criminal justice reform.

Moore said she met Irons, who is serving a 50-year sentence for burglary and assault after being tried as an adult at 16, during a trip to the Jefferson City Correctional Center in Missouri in 2017.

The 30-year-old remains one of the WNBA's biggest stars. A four-time champion and the 2014 MVP, she averaged 18.4 points, 5.9 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 1.7 steals through her first eight seasons.

By making her decision public now, Moore provides the Lynx with some time to recalibrate their roster if necessary. Teams can officially begin contract negotiations with free agents Jan. 28.

Seimone Augustus and Danielle Robinson are Minnesota's only free agents, and the 35-year-old Augustus acknowledged after last season that retirement is a possibility. She said in May she was looking to walk away after the upcoming campaign.

Moore's hiatus is unlikely to change much for the Lynx.

Her absence provided a silver lining, allowing younger players to assume larger roles than they might have otherwise.

Napheesa Collier averaged 13.1 points and 6.6 rebounds while shooting 36.1 percent from beyond the arc en route to winning Rookie of the Year. Lexie Brown was a 38.5 percent shooter from beyond the arc and averaged 7.6 points while excelling as the backup point guard.

Assuming they continue to improve alongside the veteran duo of Odyssey Sims and Sylvia Fowles, an improvement on their 18 wins from 2019 is attainable for the Lynx even without Moore.

Related

    WNBA All-Time Assist Leader Sue Bird, Storm Agree to New Contract

    WNBA logo
    WNBA

    WNBA All-Time Assist Leader Sue Bird, Storm Agree to New Contract

    Tyler Conway
    via Bleacher Report

    The Legend of Mambacita 🙏🐍

    @MirinFader spoke to friends and coaches who shared their favorite stories about Gigi Bryant ➡️

    WNBA logo
    WNBA

    The Legend of Mambacita 🙏🐍

    Mirin Fader
    via Bleacher Report

    Sparks Land Seimone Augustus

    Four-time WNBA Champion agrees to deal with Los Angeles

    Minnesota Lynx logo
    Minnesota Lynx

    Sparks Land Seimone Augustus

    Joseph Zucker
    via Bleacher Report

    2020 Hoops HOF Finalists

    Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett headline list of eight Hall of Fame finalists

    WNBA logo
    WNBA

    2020 Hoops HOF Finalists

    Adam Wells
    via Bleacher Report