Los Angeles Dodgers: Power Ranking the 50 Worst Trades in Team History

Dennis SchlossmanCorrespondent INovember 30, 2010

Los Angeles Dodgers: Power Ranking the 50 Worst Trades in Team History

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    3 Jul 1998:  Bobby Bonilla of the Los Angeles Dodgers in action during a game against the San Francisco Giants at 3COM Park in San Francisco, California.  The Giants won the game, 6-3. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule Jr.  /Allsport
    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    With the Major League Baseball Hot Stove season almost at its boiling point, many fans across Dodgertown can't help but recollect the most notable trades in the history of the Los Angeles Dodgers franchise.

    Since officially moving to Los Angeles in 1958, many player trades occurred that were instrumental in winning nine National League pennants and five World Series championships. However, along with the deals that were beneficial came the deals that were dreadful, and people wonder what may have transpired if a number of these trades could have been undone.

    The following slides rank the 50 worst trades in the history of the Los Angeles Dodgers organization, as well as offer a bit of commentary for each transaction. Please note that the rankings don't include any free-agent signings, nor do they contain any deals made prior to the Dodgers moving to Los Angeles. The list is not syndicated in any fashion and it is purely opinionated and subjective.

    Although some of the transactions listed may seem more prominent than others, the logic used in the rankings is based on the players ability at that time and into the future, weighted against what the Dodgers actually received in return.

    Fasten your seat belts and enjoy the ride through 52 years of Dodgers history.

50. Eric Davis Traded for John DeSilva—9/7/1993

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    11 May 1993:  Outfielder Eric Davis of the Los Angeles Dodgers looks to throw the ball during a game against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. Mandatory Credit: Jonathan Daniel  /Allsport
    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    From a logistics standpoint, it clearly made sense at the time for general manager Fred Claire to move Eric Davis. At 36-years-old, Davis' production didn't warrant his $3-million salary and Los Angeles hoped to get a profitable return while his value was still relatively decent.

    On September 7, 1993, Davis was dealt to the Detroit Tigers for relief pitcher John DeSilva, and as it turned out, the 1993 season would be DeSilva's last pitching in the majors. Davis went on to play another seven seasons—two of which he hit 25-or-more home runs.

    Dealing Davis may have been a productive idea at the time, but clearly the Dodgers should have shopped him much more carefully.

49. Juan Pierre Dealt to Chicago White Sox—12/15/2009

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    CHICAGO - JULY 26: Juan Pierre #1 of the Chicago White Sox runs after hitting the ball against the Seattle Mariners at U.S. Cellular Field on July 26, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox defeated the Mariners 6-1. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Imag
    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    Hoping that Manny Ramirez would rebound from his suspension and contribute on an everyday basis in 2010, general manager Ned Colletti believed that by dealing Juan Pierre, the Dodgers had an excellent opportunity to upgrade their pitching staff.

    On December 15, 2009, Pierre was dealt to the Chicago White Sox in exchange for a pair of young pitchers—reliever Jon Link and starter John Ely.

    The verdict is still out on Link and Ely. However, the trade never made much sense from a financial viewpoint. Los Angeles picked up all of Pierre's $7 million salary in 2010, and it is on the hook for another $3.5 million in 2011.

    Considering the Dodgers' offensive production in 2010, Pierre's 68 stolen bases and 96 runs scored may have made a difference in the overall performance of the squad.

48. Steve Yeager Traded to Mariners—12/11/1985

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    Although the end of his career was closing in quickly, the worst part about the Steve Yeager deal was that the Dodgers wouldn't help him retire on his own terms.

    In the winter of 1985, Los Angeles traded its catcher to the Seattle Mariners for middle-relief pitcher Ed Vande Berg.

    Yeager was legendary for his defense behind the plate. At the time, his arm was considered among the best in the game, and he had an amazing gift for managing games, especially with the younger hurlers of the pitching staff. His biggest accomplishment was winning the co-MVP of the 1981 World Series.

    In his only season with the Dodgers, Vande Berg posted a record of 1-5 with a 3.41 ERA while appearing in 60 games.

47. Sandy Alomar Traded to Chicago White Sox—7/23/06

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    Chicago White Sox catcher Sandy Alomar  before play  against the Baltimore Orioles July 28, 2006 in Baltimore, Maryland.  The Sox won 6 - 4 on a ninth inning grand slam home run. (Photo by A. Messerschmidt/Getty Images) *** Local Caption ***
    A. Messerschmidt/Getty Images

    When the summer of 2006 rolled around, it was clear that Sandy Alomar, Jr. was at the point of his career when he could no longer contribute on the field, and the Dodgers dealt the veteran catcher to the Chicago White Sox for right-handed pitcher B.J. LaMura.

    Still, the clubhouse leadership and teaching skills of Alomar were priceless, and it may have been worth the $650,000 to keep him around until he decided to retire on his own terms.

    B.J. LaMura never made it out of the minor leagues.

46. Kal Daniels Exchanged for Mike Sodders—6/27/1992

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    1990:  Outfielder Kal Daniels of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits the ball during a game. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule  /Allsport
    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    There's no question that Kalvoski Daniels was on the decline when he was traded to the Chicago Cubs for pitcher Mike Sodders in the summer of 1992, but this deal was yet another case in which Los Angeles could have shopped a player more carefully.

    In the latter part of 1992, Daniels went on to hit four home runs, six doubles, and 17 RBI for the Cubs, while Sodders never advanced past the minors during his entire career as a professional.

45. Odalis Perez and Julio Pimintel Sent to Royals—7/25/2006

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    TAMPA, FL - JUNE 02: Odalis Perez #45 of the Kansas City Royals pitches in the first inning against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Tropicana Field on June 2, 2007 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images)
    Doug Benc/Getty Images

    In the summer of 2006, the Dodgers sent starting pitchers Odalis Perez, Julio Pimentel, and Blake Johnson to the Kansas City Royals in exchange for set-up man Elmer Dessens.

    The trade may have made sense at the time, but during the remainder of the 2006 season, Dessens only appeared in 19 games for Los Angeles and logged just over 23 innings pitched. Dessens was later dealt to the Milwaukee Brewers before the 2007 season began.

    Perez retired after the 2008 season with the Washington Nationals, while Pimentel finally made his MLB debut with the Royals last season after five years in the minors. Johnson is still throwing in the Royals farm system, while Dessens made several relief appearances for the New York Mets in 2010.

44. Larry Hisle Traded to Cardinals—10/26/1972

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    Shortly after the 1972 season ended, the Dodgers traded 25-year-old outfielder Larry Hisle to the St. Louis Cardinals for pitchers Greg Millikan and Rudy Arroyo.

    While Arroyo and Millikan made careers in the minor leagues, Hisle went on to have a productive tenure in the majors before a torn rotator cuff suffered in 1979 limited the remainder of his career.

    Hisle was a two-time All-Star, and twice produced seasons with 25-or-more home runs and 115-plus RBI.

43. Willie Randolph Dealt to Oakland Athletics—5/13/1990

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    1990:  Second baseman Willie Randolph of the Los Angeles Dodgers looks on during a game at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. Mandatory Credit: Sean Haffy  /Allsport
    Sean Haffy/Getty Images

    When Los Angeles traded six-time All-Star second baseman Willie Randolph to the Oakland A's for 26-year-old outfielder Stan Javier, the Dodgers were looking to upgrade with youth in exchange for experience.

    In his first full year with the Dodgers, Javier appeared in 121 games while batting .205, and was eventually traded to the Philadelphia Phillies the following season.

    Randolph went on to have several productive seasons with the Athletics, the Milwaukee Brewers and New York Yankees before finally retiring as a player in 1993.

42. Stan Javier Sent to Phillies—7/2/1992

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    5 JUL 1992:  STAN JAVIER OF THE PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES SLIDES HEAD-FIRST DURING THEIR GAME AGAINST THE LOS ANGELES DODGERS AT DODGER STADIUM IN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.  MANDATORY CREDIT: STEPHEN DUNN/ALLSPORT
    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Just two years removed from the Willie Randolph deal, the Dodgers sent Stan Javier to the Philadelphia Phillies in exchange for outfielder Julio Peguero and pitcher Steve Searcy.

    Searcy competed with the Dodgers Triple-A affiliate, the Albuquerque Isotopes, before being moved the following year. Outside of a few at-bats in 1992 for the Phillies, Peguero never advanced past Triple-A.

    Javier went on to play another ten major-league seasons with five different clubs. 

41. Bobby Bonilla Exchanged for Mel Rojas—12/11/1998

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    13 Jun 1998:  Bobby Bonilla #25 of the Los Angeles Dodgers in action during a game against the Colorado Rockies at the Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California.  The Rockies defeated the Dodgers 4-2. Mandatory Credit: Vincent Laforet  /Allsport
    Vincent Laforet/Getty Images

    The acquisition of Bobby Bonilla never quite worked out well for the Dodgers, and in the winter of 1998 he was dealt to the New York Mets in exchange for relief pitcher Mel Rojas.

    With a salary of almost $6 million, Bonilla clearly needed to go, yet in retrospect Los Angeles got virtually nothing in return.

    In 1999, Rojas appeared in only five games for the Dodgers while recording a dire 12.60 ERA. He was dealt to the Detroit Tigers later that same year.

40. Omar Daal Traded for Rick Clelland—12/15/1995

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    LOS ANGELES - JULY 20:  Starting Pitcher Omar Daal #36 of the Los Angeles Dodgers throws against the San Francisco Giants during the MLB game on July 20, 2002 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California.  The Dodgers defeated the Giants 4-2.  (Photo by S
    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    After being traded to the Montreal Expos in 1995 for pitcher Rick Clelland, Omar Daal went on to be a very dependable fifth-slot starter over the course of his 11-year career, while Clelland never advanced past Single-A in the minors.

    Daal would later return to the Dodgers in 2002, when he posted a 11-9 record with a 3.90 ERA. He was picked up as a free agent by the Baltimore Orioles the following season

39. Pedro Guerrero Exchanged For John Tudor—12/16/1988

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    In a trade which looked somewhat productive on paper, the Dodgers sent Pedro Guerrero to the St. Louis Cardinals after the 1988 season in exchange for lefty pitcher John Tudor.

    Unfortunately for the Dodgers, Tudor fell victim to numerous injuries and never matched the dominance that he showed in the early 80s.

    Guerrero continued to produce for the Cardinals, and in 1989 had the best year of his career, hitting .311 with 42 doubles, 17 home runs, and 117 RBI.

38. Ted Sizemore Sent To Philadelphia Phillies—12/20/1976

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    While with the Dodgers, Ted Sizemore started off his career strongly by earning the NL Rookie of the Year award in 1969. After being dealt to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1971, then returning to the Dodgers once again after the 1975 season, Sizemore was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies the following year.

    In return, Los Angeles received reserve catcher Johnny Oates and pitcher Quincy Hill. After 1976, Oates never played more than 60 games in a single season and Hill never made his debut in the majors.

37. Shawn Green Dealt to Diamondbacks—1/11/2005

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    LOS ANGELES - JULY 22:  Shawn Green #15 of the Los Angeles Dodgers waits to go to bat in the 1st innng against the Colorado Rockies on July 22, 2004 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)
    Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images

    In the winter of 2005, Shawn Green was sent to the Arizona Diamondbacks for catcher Dioner Navarro, and pitchers Beltran Perez, Danny Muegge and William Juarez. The Dodgers also gave Arizona cash to cover a portion of Green's 2006 salary.

    Although it seemed sensible to move Green based on his numbers compared to his $16.7 million salary, Los Angeles should have shopped him to net a much more profitable return.

    After appearing in 50 games for the Dodgers in 2006, Navarro was traded to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays the following season. Perez, Muegge, and Juarez were career minor leaguers.

36. Lou Johnson Traded for Paul Popovich—11/30/1967

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    "Sweet" Lou Johnson captured the hearts of Dodger fans everywhere in 1965 when he replaced Tommy Davis and was instrumental in the Dodgers' run to a World Series championship. Johnson had eight hits in the Series, including two home runs—the second being a game-winning blast in the decisive seventh game.

    In November of 1967, the Dodgers traded Johnson to the Chicago Cubs for utility infielder Paul Popovich. Popovich hit .214 over the course of the 1968 season, and was dealt to the Montreal Expos the following year.

    One positive outcome of the Johnson deal, however, was that the Dodgers were eventually able to acquire Manny Mota and Maury Wills from the Expos in 1969.

35. Jose Vizcaino Exchanged for Greg Smith—12/14/1990

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    9 Mar 1999: Infielder Jose Vizcaino #5 of the Los Angeles Dodgers runs to a base during the Spring Training game against the New York Mets at the Thomas J. White Stadium in Port St. Lucie, Florida. The Dodgers defeated the Mets 11-4. Mandatory Credit: Dav
    M. David Leeds/Getty Images

    After just his second year in the majors, Jose Vizcaino was dealt to the Chicago Cubs for utility infielder Greg Smith in December of 1990.

    Smith only appeared in five games for the Dodgers in 1991 before making a career in the minor leagues, while Vizcaino went on to enjoy a productive 18-year major-league career.

    Vizcaino would later return to Los Angeles for another three years in 1998.

34. Mike Marshall and Alejandro Pena Sent to Mets—12/20/1989

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    1990:  Mike Marshall of the New York Mets looks on during batting practice before a game in the 1990 season. (Photo by: Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    In the winter of 1989, Los Angeles sent outfielder Mike Marshall and middle-reliever Alejandro Pena to the New York Mets in exchange for second baseman Juan Samuel.

    This was another deal that looked good on paper. However, Samuel could never live up to his expectations in Dodger Blue. In his first year in Los Angeles with over 550 at-bats, Samuel hit only .242. The second baseman was eventually picked up as a free agent by the Kansas City Royals after the 1992 season.

    Marshall went on to play another three seasons with two different clubs, while Pena managed to maintain his effectiveness for another six years.

33. Kazuhisa Ishii Exchanged for Jason Phillips—3/20/2005

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    SEATTLE - JUNE 17:  Kazuhisa Ishii #25 of the New York Mets pitches during the game with the Seattle Mariners on June 17 2005 at Safeco Field in Seattle Washington. The Mariners won 5-0. (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    When the Dodgers sent Kaz Ishii to the New York Mets for catcher Jason Phillips in 2005, the Dodgers had high hopes that Phillips would live up to his expectations.

    Ishii was a formidable starter, having won 13 or more games in his first three years in the bigs, while Phillips had the potential to fill the Dodgers' vacancy behind the dish.

    In his only year as a Dodger, Phillips hit .238 in 121 games played, and was later granted free agency after the 2005 season.

    Ishii is still pitching in the Pacific Coast league today.

32. Dave Stewart Dealt to Texas Rangers—12/19/1983

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    OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 5:  Dave Stewart #34 of the Oakland Athletics looks on during an MLB game on August 5, 1991 at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, California. (Photo by Otto Greule Jr./Getty Images)
    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    In the winter of 1983, the Dodgers sent hard-throwing righty Dave Stewart and reliever Ricky Wright to the Texas Rangers for starter Rick Honeycutt.

    At the time Stewart wasn't even close to his heyday. Stewart would eventually go on to win 20 or more games four times, lead the AL in innings pitched twice, and throw 10 or more complete games two times.

    Wright on the other hand, never appeared in more than 20 games for the Rangers in a season, while Honeycutt was traded to the Oakland Athletics after posting a 2-12 record for Los Angeles during the 1987 season.

    Honeycutt is the pitching coach for the Dodgers today.

31. Juan Guzman Sent to Blue Jays—9/21/1987

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    1 Sep 1993:  Pitcher Juan Guzman of the Toronto Blue Jays throws a pitch during a game against the Oakland Athletics at the Oakland Coliseum in Oakland, California.  Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule  /Allsport
    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    Hard-throwing righty Juan Guzman hadn't yet made his MLB debut before he was dealt to the Toronto Blue Jays for infielder Mike Sharperson in September of 1987.

    Guzman finally appeared in his first game during the summer of 1991 and, during his second season with the Blue Jays, was selected to the American League All-Star squad while posting a 16-5 record with a 2.64 ERA in over 180 innings of work. During his eight-year tenure with Toronto, Guzman compiled a 80-66 record with a 4.08 ERA while tallying 1,085 strikeouts, 15 complete games, and two shutouts.

    Sharperson played extremely well during his six years in Los Angeles, but didn't quite measure up to the early success of Guzman in Toronto.

    Sharperson was used primarily as a utility man during his career with the Dodgers, however, he did play regularly in 1992 and was selected to the NL All-Star squad. He hit .300 while appearing in 128 games that year, and recorded 31 doubles, three home runs, and 36 RBI. He was released by the Dodgers just before the 1994 season began.

30. Candy Maldonado Traded for Alex Trevino—12/11/1985

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    CLEVELAND INDIANS INFIELDER CANDY MALDONADO MAKES CONTACT WITH A PITCH DURING THE INDIANS GAME AT INDIANS PARK IN CLEVELAND, OHIO
    Rick Stewart/Getty Images

    In another lopsided deal during the winter of 1985, the Dodgers sent outfielder Candy Maldonado to the San Francisco Giants in exchange for reserve catcher Alex Trevino.

    Maldonado was only 24 years old at the time, and went on to enjoy a productive 15-year career with seven different teams. He hit more than 20 doubles in a season six times in his career and eclipsed the 20 home run mark three times.

    In 156 at-bats for the Dodgers in 1987, Trevino hit .222 with three home runs and 16 RBI, and was released by the Dodgers before the 1988 season began.

29. Paul LoDuca and Others Sent to Marlins—7/30/2004

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    VERO BEACH, FL - MARCH 2:  Catcher Paul Lo Duca #16 of the Florida Marlins looks on against the Los Angeles Dodgers during MLB Spring Training on March 2, 2005 at Holman Stadium in Vero Beach, Florida. The Dodgers defeated the Marlins 4-2.  (Photo by Rona
    Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

    One day before the 2004 MLB trade deadline, the Dodgers sent catcher Paul LoDuca, outfielder Juan Encarnacion, and reliever Guillermo Mota to the Florida Marlins in exchange for pitcher Brad Penny, first baseman Hee-Seop Choi, and pitcher Bill Murphy.

    LoDuca was a four-time All-Star, hit more than 23 doubles six times in his career, tallied more than 10 home runs four times, and posted a .300-plus batting average three times.

    Mota was a dependable, hard-throwing set-up man, while Encarnacion was solid in all three outfield positions. In 141 games for the Marlins in 2005, Encarnacion hit .287 with 16 home runs and 76 RBI.

    Hee-Seop Choi was waived by the Dodgers before the 2006 season began, and Bill Murphy was a career minor-leaguer outside of a handful of MLB appearances.

    Penny, however, was productive for Los Angeles during at least two seasons. He won 16-or-more games twice as a Dodger, but after going 6-9 during the 2008 season, he was granted free agency.

28. Gary Sheffield Dealt to Atlanta Braves—1/15/2002

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    SEATTLE - JUNE 14:  Right fielder Gary Sheffield #11 of the Atlanta Braves swings at a Seattle Mariners pitch during the interleague game at Safeco Field on June 14, 2003 in Seattle, Washington. Atlanta won 3-1.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr./Getty Images)
    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    In a four-player deal which saw pitcher Odalis Perez, outfielder Brian Jordan, and reliever Andrew Brown sent to the Dodgers from the Atlanta Braves, the Dodgers sacrificed their most formidable power threat, Gary Sheffield.

    After leaving Los Angeles, Sheffield continued to produce. He hit 25-or-more home runs five times post-2002, scored 100-or-more runs four times, and drove in 120-plus runs three times. He was also selected to three All-Star teams three times after his tenure with the Dodgers.

    Perez started strongly with the Dodgers before fading and eventually being traded to the Kansas City Royals before the trade deadline in 2006. Brown roamed the Dodgers' farm system before finally making his MLB debut with the Cleveland Indians four years later.

    Jordan never lived up to his expectations in Los Angeles, and was granted free agency after the 2003 season.

27. Todd Hollandsworth Traded for Tom Goodwin—7/31/2000

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    17 Apr 1998:  Outfielder Todd Hollandsworth of the Los Angeles Dodgers in action during a game against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. The Dodgers defeated the Cubs 10-3. Mandatory Credit: Harry How  /Allsport
    Harry How/Getty Images

    In another late-July deal in 2000, Los Angeles sent outfielder Todd Hollandsworth, pitcher Randey Dorame, and outfielder Kevin Gibbs to the Colorado Rockies in exchange for speedy outfielder Tom Goodwin.

    Hollandsworth, a former Rookie of the Year, went on to hit .323 with 11 home runs for the Rockies the following season and enjoyed a 12-year career with eight different teams. Goodwin was released by Los Angeles just before the 2002 season after two disappointing campaigns with the Dodgers.

    Both Gibbs and Dorame spent their entire careers in the minor leagues.

26. Tommy Davis Sent to New York Mets—11/29/1966

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    In November of 1966, the Dodgers traded legendary outfielder Tommy Davis and utility man Derrell Griffith to the Chicago Cubs for utility players Jim Hickman and Ron Hunt.

    Early in his career, Davis dominated the Dodger record books. He still holds the team record for hits per season by a right-handed batter with 230, and he was the only Dodgers player in team history to win back-to-back batting titles. His 153 RBI in 1962 broke Roy Campanella's team record of 142 in 1953 and remains the franchise record.

    Griffith never advanced beyond the minor leagues with the Mets, and he was later traded to the Houston Astros.

    Both Hunt and Hickman saw limited duty with the Dodgers in 1967 and were traded away before the 1968 season began.

    There's no question that Davis' career was on the decline at the time, but Dodgers general manager Buzzie Bavasi should have surely sought out a much better deal.

25. Henry Rodriguez Dealt to Montreal Expos—5/23/1995

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    15 Mar 2000:  Henry Rodriguez #40 of the Chicago Cubs swings at the ball during the Spring Training Game against the Milwaukee Brewers at the HoHoKam Stadium in Mesa, Arizona. The Cubs defeated the Brewers 10-4. Mandatory Credit: Donald Miralle  /Allsport
    Donald Miralle/Getty Images

    In the spring of 1995, the Dodgers traded outfielder Henry Rodriguez and infielder Jeff Treadway to the Montreal Expos for outfielder Roberto Kelly and reliever Joey Eischen.

    Los Angeles never knew the potential of Rodriguez, as he went on to hit .276 with 42 doubles, 36 home runs, and 103 RBI with the Expos just two seasons later. He eventually went on to enjoy a productive 11-year career, while he hit more than 25 home runs and drove in at least 80 runs on four occasions.

    Treadway was at the tail end of his career and retired after the 1995 season. Kelly was granted free agency after a sub-par year with the Dodgers in 1995, while Eischen was dealt to the Detroit Tigers after only one season in Los Angeles.

24. Josh Bell Traded for George Sherrill—7/30/2009

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    ST. LOUIS - JULY 15: Relief pitcher George Sherill #52 of the Los Angeles Dodgers throws against the St. Louis Cardinals at Busch Stadium on July 15, 2010 in St. Louis, Missouri.  The Cardinals beat the Dodgers 7-1.  (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images
    Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

    Just before the trade deadline in 2009, the Dodgers sent third baseman Josh Bell and pitcher Steve Johnson to the Baltimore Orioles for lefty reliever George Sherrill.

    The verdict is still out on the 25-year-old Bell. Bell, who at the time was the most productive third base prospect on the Dodgers' farm, made his debut for the Orioles in the second half of the 2010 season.

    Johnson, also 25 years of age, had the most productive year of his minor league career in 2010, starting 28 games and tallying a 7-8 record for Bowie, the Orioles' Double-A affiliate.

    After a very effective year in 2009, Sherrill went into a virtual free fall last season. In 65 games, Sherrill only logged 36 innings while posting a 6.69 ERA. He's expected to be non-tendered by the Dodgers on December 2.

23. Roger Cedeno and Charles Johnson Sent to Mets—12/1/1998

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    28 Feb 2002 : Roger Cedeno of the New York Mets during the Spring Training game against the St.Louis Cardinals at Roger Dean Stadium in Jupiter, Florida. The Cardinals won 5-2. DIGTAL IMAGE. Mandatory Credit: Eliot Schechter/Getty Images
    Eliot J. Schechter/Getty Images

    During the winter of 1998, the Dodgers sacrificed outfielder Roger Cedeno and Gold Glove catcher Charles Johnson to obtain catcher Todd Hundley and pitcher Arnie Gooch from the New York Mets.

    In Cedeno's first season in a Mets uniform, he stole 66 bases and hit .313, and enjoyed another seven productive seasons in the majors with four different clubs.

    Johnson was dealt to the Baltimore Orioles on the very same day that the Mets acquired him, and in his first year with the Birds he hit .251 with 16 home runs and 54 RBI.

    Hunley batted just .207 in 114 games during his first year with the Dodgers, and he was granted free agency after the 2000 season.

    Gooch never made it out of the minor leagues.

22. Franklin Stubbs Exchanged for Terry Wells—4/1/1990

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    1990 - Franklin Stubbs #24 of the Houston Astros stands ready at bat during a 1990 season game. Franklin Stubbs played for the Astros in 1990. (Photo by: Getty Images)
    Getty Images/Getty Images

    In an attempt to bolster the pitching staff, Los Angeles sent outfielder and first baseman Franklin Stubbs to the Houston Astros for lefty hurler Terry Wells.

    In Stubbs' first full year with the Astros, he hit .261 with 23 doubles, 23 home runs, and 71 RBI. Stubbs would eventually go on to play three more seasons with both the Milwaukee Brewers and the Detroit Detroit Tigers

    Wells, who appeared in only five games for the Dodgers during the 1990 season, was granted free agency at the end of the year and would never pitch in the majors again.

21. Frank Robinson Dealt to California Angels—11/28/1972

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    CENTURY CITY, CA - NOVEMBER 13:  Former Major League Baseball Player Frank Robinson attends the opening of SPORT: Iooss & Leifer at the Annenberg Space For Photography on November 13, 2009 in Century City, California.  (Photo by John M. Heller/Getty Image
    John M. Heller/Getty Images

    In November of 1972, Dodgers general manager Al Campanis concocted another blockbuster deal which sent outfielder Frank Robinson, pitcher Billy Singer, infielder Billy Grabarkewitz, pitcher Mark Strahler, and utility man Bobby Valentine to the California Angels in exchange for hurler Andy Messersmith and infielder Ken McMullen.

    Robinson's accolades at the time were unparalleled. He won the American League Triple Crown in 1966, was a two-time League MVP, a 12-time All-Star, and was twice named World Series MVP. In 1972, many thought he had little production left, but during his first year with the Angels he hit .261 with 29 doubles, 30 home runs and 97 RBI.

    In his first season with the Angels, Bill Singer posted a 20-14 record with a 3.22 ERA, logged over 315 innings pitched and hurled 19 complete games.

    Valentine went on to play a utility role for seven years with four different teams, while Strahler made a career in the minor leagues. Grabarkewitz retired at the end of the 1975 season after being demoted to Triple-A by the Oakland Athletics.

    Messersmith compiled a 53-30 record with the Dodgers over three seasons before being granted free agency in 1976, while McMullen later returned to the Dodgers after three seasons with the Angels.

20. Ron Perranoski Sent to Twins—11/28/1967

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    In the 1967 offseason, Dodgers GM Buzzie Bavasi completed another multi-player deal which sent closer Ron Perranoski, Gold Glove catcher John Roseboro, and pitcher Bob Miller to the Minnesota Twins in exchange for pitcher Mudcat Grant and utility infielder Zoilo Versalles.

    At the time, Perranoski was known as being among the best finishers in the game. In his second and third seasons with the Twins, he led the American League in saves with 31 and 24, respectively. His ERA of 2.11 in 1969 was the second-best posting of his entire career.

    John Roseboro was known primarily for his defense and was named to his first AL All-Star team in only his second season in Minnesota. Bob Miller was effective for the Twins' bullpen, as he posted a 5-8 record with a 2.91 ERA in 93 appearances over the course of his two years with the club.

    In his only season as a Dodger, Mudcat Grant posted a 6-4 record in 37 appearances. He was eventually drafted by the Montreal Expos in the 1968 expansion draft.

    Zoilo Versalles also spent just one year in Los Angeles, where he hit .196 with two home runs and 24 RBI while appearing in 122 games. Like Grant, Versalles was also chosen in the 1968 expansion draft, having been selected by the San Diego Padres as the 20th overall pick.

19. Dodgers Deal for Octavio Dotel—7/31/2010

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    CHICAGO - JUNE 30: Octavio Dotel #29 of the Pittsburgh Pirates pitches in the 9th inning on his way to a save against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on June 30, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. The Pirates defeated the Cubs 2-0. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Get
    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    In an effort to bolster the bullpen just before the 2010 trade deadline, Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti dealt pitcher James McDonald and prospect Andrew Lambo to the Pittsburgh Pirates in return for veteran reliever Octavio Dotel.

    Dotel would turn out to be a disappointment for Los Angeles and he was in turn traded to the Colorado Rockies in late September. The player named to eventually round out the deal was Anthony Jackson.

    While with the Pirates in 2010, McDonald started 11 games and compiled a 4-5 record with a 3.52 ERA. He struck out 61 batters while logging just over 64 innings of work. Pirates coaching is looking forward to him maintaining a second or third slot in the starting pitching rotation next season.

    In 26 games for the Altoona Curve, the Pirates Double-A affiliate, outfielder Andrew Lambo hit .275 with two home runs and 10 RBI, but once acclimated, hopes to play a more prominent role in 2011.

18. Dodgers Acquire Scott Podsednik from Royals—7/28/2010

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    LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 01:  Scott Podsednik #21 of the Los Angeles Dodgers attempts a bunt against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium on September 1, 2010 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
    Harry How/Getty Images

    Also days before the 2010 trade deadline, the Dodgers traded prospects Lucas May and Elisaul Pimentel to the Kansas City Royals for speedy outfielder Scott Podsednik, with hopes of adding depth to their struggling outfield.

    May was by far the best prospect at catcher in the Los Angeles minor league system, while Pimentel was a featured starter for the Great Lakes Loons, the Dodgers' Single-A affiliate.

    Podsednik missed the final month of the season with a foot injury and would later decline his 2011 player option, which allowed him to become a free agent.

17. Edwin Jackson Sent to Tampa Bay—1/14/2006

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    OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 22:  Edwin Jackson #33 of the Chicago White Sox pitches against the Oakland Athletics at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on September 22, 2010 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
    Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

    In the winter of 2006, Los Angeles traded starter Edwin Jackson and prospect Chuck Tiffany to the Tampa bay Devil Rays for relievers Danys Baez and Lance Carter.

    Jackson, now a solid starter at the back end of any rotation, threw the first no-hitter of his young career in June of 2010 for the Arizona Diamondbacks, just a week before being dealt to the Chicago White Sox.

    Last year Tiffany was a starter for the Florence Freedom in the Independent League.

    After appearing in 46 games with nine saves in the first part of 2006 for the Dodgers, Baez was dealt to the Atlanta Braves later that season, while Carter recently retired after trying to resurrect his career by playing in Japan.

16. Dave Roberts Dealt for Henri Stanley—7/31/2004

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    CINCINNATI - SEPTEMBER 14: Dave Roberts #10 of the San Diego Padres stands ready at bat against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park September 14, 2006 in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Padres defeated the Reds 4 to 2. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
    Andy Lyons/Getty Images

    In July of 2004, the Dodgers traded speedy outfielder Dave Roberts to the Boston Red Sox for outfielding prospect Henri Stanley.

    Roberts had been a staple atop of the Dodgers batting order for three seasons, and later went on to produce his signature year with the San Diego Padres in 2005. During that season, Roberts hit .293 with 13 triples, 49 stolen bases, and 44 RBI in 129 games.

    Stanley never made it out of the minor leagues.

15. Eric Young Traded to Chicago Cubs—12/12/1999

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    9 Jul 1998: Infielder Eric Young #21 of the Los Angeles Dodgers in action during a game against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. The Dodgers won the game, 12-3.
    Aubrey Washington/Getty Images

    In the winter of 1999 with hopes of strengthening the bullpen, Dodgers general manager Kevin Malone dealt second baseman Eric Young and starting pitcher Ismael Valdez to the Chicago Cubs for reliever Terry Adams along with prospects Chad Ricketts and Brian Stephenson.

    Young was just coming off of another strong season in Los Angeles, having hit .281, stealing 51 bases, and scoring 73 runs while appearing in 119 games. Young would later go on to play an additional six seasons, four of which he was an everyday starter for the Cubs and the Milwaukee Brewers.

    In five full seasons as a starter for the Dodgers, Valdez compiled a 58-53 record with a 3.39 ERA, and recorded 10 complete games with five shutouts.

    Adams was nothing more than a decent middle-man on the Dodgers staff, while Ricketts and Stephenson were career minor leaguers.

14. Rick Sutcliffe Dealt to Indians—12/9/1981

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    CHICAGO - 1987:  Rick Sutcliffe #40 of the Chicago Cubs winds back to pitch during a game in the 1987 season at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois . ( Photo by: Jonathan Daniel/ Getty Images )
    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    In another lopsided deal, the Dodgers sent starting pitcher Rick Sutcliffe and second baseman Jack Perconte to the Cleveland Indians during the winter of 1981 in exchange for outfielder Jorge Orta, catcher Jack Fimple, and pitcher Larry White.

    Sutcliffe, who won the 1979 NL Rookie of the Year Award with the Dodgers, would later go on to win the American League Cy Young Award with the Indians in 1984, as well as being named to three All-Star squads.

    After being traded, Perconte went on to be a regular starter for both the Indians and the Seattle Mariners over four seasons.

    In his only season in a Dodgers uniform, Orta hit .217 with two home runs and eight RBI while appearing in 86 games.

    Fimple was nothing more than a seldom used reserve, and Larry White appeared in only 11 games over two seasons with Los Angeles.

13. Don Newcombe Sent to Reds—6/15/1958

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    LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 31:  Former Dodger Don Newcombe waves to the crowd before the Los Angeles Dodgers Opening Day game against San Francisco Giants at Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)
    Jeff Gross/Getty Images

    In the summer of 1958, Los Angeles GM Buzzie Bavasi completed yet another unfavorable deal, having sent Dodger legend Don Newcombe to the Cincinnati Reds in exchange for first baseman Steve Bilko and reliever Johnny Klippstein.

    Newcombe was a three-time winner of at least 20 games, and his signature season was with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956 when he posted a 27-7 record with a 3.06 ERA. He tallied 18 complete games with five shutouts that year and captured the NL Cy Young Award. After being dealt by Los Angeles, Newcombe went on to pitch another three seasons.

    In his only season with the Dodgers, Bilko played in 47 games, while hitting .208 with seven home runs and 18 RBI.

    Klippstein was one of several closers on the Dodgers' pitching staff in 1959, and was dealt to the Cleveland Indians in 1960.

12. Cody Ross Sent to Reds—4/24/2006

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    ARLINGTON, TX - NOVEMBER 01:  Cody Ross #13 of  the San Francisco Giants bats against the Texas Rangers in Game Five of the 2010 MLB World Series at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington on November 1, 2010 in Arlington, Texas. The Giants won 3-1.  (Photo by Rona
    Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

    The worst part about the Cody Ross deal was that GM Ned Colletti sent him to the Cincinnati Reds for a player to be named later, who eventually turned out to be pitcher Ben Kozlowski.

    Ross was a late-bloomer, as his benchmark season came with the Florida Marlins in 2009, when he hit .270 with 37 doubles, 24 home runs, and 90 RBI. He was also instrumental in the San Francisco Giants' run to the World Series championship in 2010.

    Kozlowski never advanced past the minor leagues.

11. Jose Offerman Traded to Royals—12/17/1995

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    16 Apr 2000:  Jose Offerman #30 of the Boston Red Sox looks on from the field during the game against the Oakland Athletics at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox defeated the Athletics 5-4. Mandatory Credit: Ezra O. Shaw  /Allsport
    Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

    Coming off of an All-Star season with the Dodgers in 1995, infielder Jose Offerman was traded to the Kansas City Royals for middle reliever Billy Brewer at the end of the year.

    Offerman's signature season would come just three years later with the Royals, when he hit .315 with 102 runs scored, 28 doubles, 13 triples, seven home runs and 66 RBI. He later went on to compete in nine additional seasons after being traded by the Dodgers.

    While with the Dodgers organization, Brewer spent all of his time in the minor leagues. He was later traded to the Yankees in the summer of 1996 for pitcher Mike Judd.

10. Eric Karros Dealt to Cubs—12/4/2002

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    LOS ANGELES - JULY 20:  First Baseman Eric Karros #23 of the Los Angeles Dodgers fouls off a pitch from Felix Rodriguez of the San Francisco Giants in the seventh inning of the MLB game on July 20, 2002 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. The Do
    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    In the winter of 2002, Los Angeles GM Dan Evans sent first baseman Eric Karros and utility infielder Mark Grudzielanek to the Chicago Cubs in exchange for catcher Todd Hundley and outfielder Chad Hermansen.

    Karros had a fairly productive season during his only year in Chicago, hitting .286 with 12 home runs and 40 RBI. He was signed as a free agent by the Oakland Athletics in the winter 2004, and would retire at the end of that year.

    Grudzielanek, the former All-Star, had an excellent year with the Cubs in 2003, when he played in 121 games and posted a .314 average for the season. He would later go on to win a Gold Glove Award with the Kansas City Royals in 2006.

    In his second stint with the Dodgers, Todd Hundley appeared in only 21 games and hit .182 during the 2003 season. After battling injuries, he retired after becoming a free agent at the end of the 2004 season.

    During his only year in Los Angeles, Hermansen hit .222 while appearing in only 11 games.

9. The Mike Piazza Controversy—5/15/1998

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    17 Apr 1998:  Catcher Mike Piazza of the Los Angeles Dodgers in action during a game against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. The Dodgers defeated the Cubs 10-3. Mandatory Credit: Harry How  /Allsport
    Harry How/Getty Images

    In the summer of 1998, the Dodgers were very instrumental in helping the Florida Marlins virtually disseminate their entire organization.

    On May 15, Los Angeles sent their franchise player, Mike Piazza, along with third baseman Todd Zeile to the Florida Marlins in exchange for Gary Sheffield, Bobby Bonilla, Jim Eisenreich, Charles Johnson, and Manuel Barrios.

    Within a week, Piazza was traded by the Marlins to the New York Mets for Preston Wilson, Ed Yarnall, and Geoff Goetz.

    In six seasons with the Dodgers, Piazza was selected to six All-Star squads, was named as the MVP of the 1996 All-Star Game, earned six Silver Slugger Awards, and won the NL Rookie of the Year Award in 1993.

    Piazza's signature season with the Dodgers came in 1997 when he hit .362 with 40 home runs and 124 RBI.

    Besides the glove of Charles Johnson behind the dish, the only other positive for the Dodgers was acquiring slugger Gary Sheffield. Sheffield's benchmark year in Los Angeles arrived in 2000 when he hit .325 with 105 runs scored, 24 doubles, 43 home runs, and 109 RBI, while posting a slugging percentage of .643.

8. John Franco Sent to Cincinnati Reds—5/9/1983

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    8 Mar 1998:  Pitcher John Franco of the New York Mets in action during a spring training game against the St. Louis Cardinals at the Roger Dean Stadium in Jupiter, Florida. The Mets defeated the Cardinals 5-4. Mandatory Credit: Stephen Dunn  /Allsport
    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    When the Dodgers sent relievers John Franco and Brett Wise to the Cincinnati Reds in the spring of 1983 in exchange for utility player Rafael Landestoy, it didn't seem like much of a sacrifice.

    Neither Franco or Wise had yet made it out of the minors, and Landestoy had a proven track record for having a solid glove off the bench.

    Needless to say, Franco went on to be recognized as one of the most effective closers that baseball has ever seen. His 424 career saves rank fourth all-time in MLB history.

    Coincidentally, Landestoy went on to retire after the 1984 season, and Wise never advanced past Triple-A.

7. Sid Fernandez Dealt to Mets—12/8/1983

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    1989:  Sid Fernandez of the New York Mets winds back to pitch during a game in the 1989 season. ( Photo by: Rick Stewart/Getty Images)
    Rick Stewart/Getty Images

    In the winter of 1983, general manager Al Campanis dealt hard-throwing lefty Sid Fernandez to the New York Mets for pitcher Carlos Diaz and utility man Bob Bailor.

    The Dodgers never really knew what they had with Fernandez, as he was moved just after completing his rookie season. Fernandez would go on to enjoy a 15-year major league career, 10 of which he spent with the Mets. His benchmark season came in 1983, when he posted a 16-6 record with a 3.52 ERA while recording two complete games and one shutout.

    Diaz saw limited duty in the Dodgers bullpen before he was finally released after the 1986 season.

    Bailor spent two years in Los Angeles playing the role of a utility man and was released in April of 1986. He retired as a player later that year.

6. Maury Wills Sent to Pirates—12/1/1966

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    2 Apr 2001: Former Dodger player Maury Wills throws out the first pitch prior to the game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. The Dodgers won the game 1-0. DIGITAL IMAGE. Mandatory Credit: Scott Halleran/ALLSPORT
    Scott Halleran/Getty Images

    In yet another horrible move by GM Buzzie Bavasi, the Dodgers sent infielder Maury Wills to the Pittsburgh Pirates during the winter of 1966 for utility man Bob Bailey and infielder Gene Michael.

    The achievements that Wills earned with the Dodgers were endless. He was the 1962 National League MVP, a seven-time All-Star selection, a three-time World Series champion, and won the Gold Glove award twice. Wills stole 104 bases in 1962 to establish a new record in baseball, breaking the previous mark of 96, set by Ty Cobb in 1915.

    His signature season in Los Angeles came in 1962, when he appeared in 165 games, and hit .299 with 208 base hits, 130 runs scored, 13 triples and 104 stolen bases.

    Bailey only spent two seasons in Los Angeles. His best year as a Dodger was in 1968 when he appeared in 105 games while batting .227 with eight home runs and 39 RBI.

    In Michael's lone season with the Dodgers in 1967, he hit .202 while appearing in only 98 games.

5. Dodgers Acquire Casey Blake—7/26/2008

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    LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 17:  Casey Blake #23 of the Los Angeles Dodgers runs to first base afeter hitting a RBI single in the ninth inning against the Colorado Rockies at Dodger Stadium on September 17, 2010 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Lisa
    Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images

    In an effort to fill a gap at the hot corner, the Dodgers dealt catcher Carlos Santana and pitching prospect Jon Meloan to the Cleveland Indians just before the 2008 trade deadline for veteran third baseman Casey Blake.

    To many who are familiar with the Los Angeles farm system, Santana was considered as the Dodgers' top prospect at the time, and Dodgers fans everywhere were left scratching their heads, as there wasn't any other catcher on the farm being close to major-league ready.

    Santana's 2008 minor league stat line showed a batting average of .326 with 125 runs scored, 39 doubles, 21 home runs, 117 RBI, and 10 stolen bases.

    After finally being called up by the Indians in 2010, Santana appeared in 46 games and posted a .260 average with six home runs and 22 RBI.

    Jon Meloan is now a member of the Oakland Athletics after a few brief major-league call-ups.

    Although Blake was instrumental in the Dodgers' runs during the 2008 and 2009 playoffs, the Indians got the better end of the deal by far, considering Santana's potential.

    Nevertheless, Santana is still young and has much to prove. Five years down the road, this deal could be pushed inside of the top three worst trades, but at the same time, may not factor in to the top 10 at all.

4. Paul Konerko Traded for Jeff Shaw—7/4/1998

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    CHICAGO - AUGUST 29: Paul Konerko #14 of the Chicago White Sox hits the ball against the New York Yankees at U.S. Cellular Field on August 29, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. The Yankees defeated the White Sox 2-1. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    In order to fill an urgent vacancy in the Dodgers' bullpen, Tommy Lasorda, during his short stint as Dodgers' GM, dealt first baseman Paul Konerko and pitcher Dennys Reyes to the Cincinnati Reds in July of 1998 in exchange for closer Jeff Shaw.

    Konerko was only halfway through his rookie season when he was traded and the Dodgers had no idea of the first baseman's potential at that point in time.

    Konerko was later named as an All-Star on four occasions, and his benchmark season came in 2006 with the Chicago White Sox when he hit .313 with 97 runs scored, 30 doubles, 35 home runs and 113 RBI. Konerko remains among the league's top sluggers today.

    Reyes was an effective middle-man for nine different clubs over the course of his 14-year MLB career.

    Shaw became the primary closer for Los Angeles over four seasons, and finally retired after the 2004 campaign.

3. Ron Cey Sent to Cubs—1/20/1983

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    CHICAGO -1985:  Ron Cey #10 of the Chicago Cubs swings at the pitch during a game in the 1985 season at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois .  (Photo by: Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    During the winter of 1983, GM Al Campanis made one of the worst deals in his tenure as he sent third baseman Ron Cey to the Chicago Cubs for prospects Vance Lovelace and Dan Cataline.

    While with the Dodgers, Cey was named to six All-Star squads and earned the co-MVP award for the 1981 World Series along with teammates Steve Yeager and Pedro Guerrero. His signature season in Los Angeles came in 1977 when he blasted 30 home runs and tallied 110 RBI.

    Cey had plenty in the tank after being dealt to the Cubs. Over the course of his four-year career in Chicago, he appeared in 547 games with an overall average of .261. During that span he also recorded 250 runs, 467 hits, 84 home runs, and 286 RBI.

    Outside of a handful of games in which Lovelace appeared in the late-80s, both he and Cataline were career minor leaguers.

2. Davey Lopes Traded for Lance Hudson—2/8/1982

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    2 Mar 1998:  Davey Lopes #30 of the San Diego Padres looks on during a spring training game against the Colorado Rockies at Hi Corbett Field in Tucson, Arizona. The Padres defeated the Rockies 6-1. Mandatory Credit: Todd Warshaw  /Allsport
    Todd Warshaw/Getty Images

    In yet another detrimental transaction, Dodgers general manager Al Campanis traded All-Star second baseman Davey Lopes to the Oakland Athletics for infielding prospect Lance Hudson during the winter of 1982.

    Lopes won a Gold Glove Award in 1978, was a member of the 1981 World Series champion Dodgers, and was named to the NL All-Star team four times. His best year as a Dodger came in 1979 when he hit .265 with 28 home runs, 73 RBI, and 44 stolen bases.

    After leaving the Dodgers, Lopes played for another six seasons with three different clubs. In 1985, he hit .284 for the Chicago Cubs, while tallying 11 home runs, 44 RBI and 47 stolen bases at 40 years of age.

    Lance Hudson never advanced past Double-A in the minor leagues.

    Following his retirement as a player, Lopes coached for several teams, including the San Diego Padres and Washington Nationals, before becoming manager of the Milwaukee Brewers in 2000.

    Lopes later joined the Philadelphia Phillies, where he was responsible for the highly elevated running game. He was highly influential in both the Phillies' championship in 2008 and World Series appearance in 2009.

    After 29 years, Lopes finally returned to Los Angeles, and will coach first base for the Dodgers in 2010.

1. Pedro Martinez Sent to Expos—11/17/1993

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    ANAHEIM, CA - OCTOBER 6:  Pitcher Pedro Martinez #45 of the Boston Red Sox delivers a pitch during the American League Division Series with the Anaheim Angels, Game Two on October 6, 2004 at Angels Stadium at Anaheim in Anaheim, California.   (Photo by St
    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    And finally, former Los Angeles Dodgers GM Fred Claire gets credited with making the worst trade in the history of the franchise.

    In November of 1993, Claire dealt pitcher Pedro Martinez to the Montreal Expos in exchange for second baseman Delino DeShields.

    Martinez was only 21-years-old when he left Los Angeles, and he later would develop into one of the most successful power-pitchers that the game has ever seen.

    Among his most notable achievements are his three AL Cy Young Awards, his eight All-Star appearances, as well as his Triple Crown Award in 1999. He led the American League in ERA four times, led the AL in strikeouts three times, and led the AL in wins with 23 in 1999.

    DeShields' career as a Dodger lasted four seasons, and was mediocre at best. During that span, his numbers per season averaged out to a .255 batting average with 115 hits, four home runs, and 35 RBI.

    DeShields left Los Angeles after being granted free agency in 1996 and eventually retired in 2001.