Terrell Owens: Vic Fangio Should Be Drug Tested After Comments on Racism in NFL

Adam Wells@adamwells1985Featured ColumnistJune 3, 2020

Former wide receiver Terrell Owens delivers his Pro Football Hall of Fame speech on Saturday, Aug. 4, 2018, in Chattanooga, Tenn. Instead of speaking at the Hall of Fame festivities in Canton, Ohio, Owens celebrated his induction at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, where he played football and basketball and ran track. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Mark Humphrey/Associated Press

Terrell Owens responded to comments made by Denver Broncos head coach Vic Fangio about racism not being an issue in the NFL

Speaking to reporters Tuesday, Fangio said problems of racial discrimination are "minimal" in the league: "I don't see racism at all in the NFL, I don't see discrimination in the NFL." 

Owens wrote on Twitter that Fangio "NEEDS TO BE DRUG TESTED" for his statement:

Fangio's comments sparked backlash on social media, with Seattle Seahawks running back Chris Carson tweeting the Broncos head coach "is a joke."

During the same press conference, Fangio called the killing of George Floyd a "societal issue that we all have to join in to correct."

Former NFL head coach Tony Dungy told ESPN Radio's Golic and Wingo (h/t ESPN's Jeff Legwold) he disagrees with Fangio's sentiment that there isn't a race problem in the league:

"To say there's no racism and no problem, I think, really is not recognizing the situation. As you said, the league has talked about having 70-75 percent African American players and no black [team] presidents, just a couple of black general managers. ... It is not a complete meritocracy, even though it's a great place. And I think the same thing could be said of our country."

Owens specifically mentioned Colin Kaepernick, who was with the San Francisco 49ers during each of Fangio's four seasons as defensive coordinator from 2011 to 2014. 

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Kaepernick has been a free agent since opting out of his deal with the 49ers in March 2017. He began protesting police brutality and systemic racism during the national anthem throughout the 2016 season.