NFL1000: Ranking the Top Right Tackles of 2017 Season

NFL1000 ScoutsFeatured ColumnistFebruary 1, 2018

NFL1000: Ranking the Top Right Tackles of 2017 Season

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    Winslow Townson/Associated Press

    For the most part, the NFL still values left tackles over right tackles. The blocker who can best defend a right-handed quarterback's blind side makes more money than one who holds up the quarterback's vision on first-read throws on short drops.

    According to Over The Cap, eight left tackles are currently averaging $12 million or more per season. Philadelphia's Lane Johnson is the only right tackle making over $10 million.

    Value, however, doesn't always completely equate to importance.

    If your offense is heavily dependent on right-handed power running and quick passes based on front-side route concepts, the left tackle's defensive assignment won't have time to get to the quarterback on certain plays, putting the right tackle under more pressure. The Kansas City Chiefs and Philadelphia Eagles each feature concepts in which their ideal quarterback combines designed mobility and option concepts, and their right tackles—Mitchell Schwartz and Lane Johnson, respectively—are their best blockers.

    Why are right tackles relatively devalued? Positional traditionalism has something to do with it, as conventional wisdom dictates it takes more pure athleticism to play the left side than the right. Right tackles generally have less fluid and agile dropbacks and kick-steps through the pocket, although there are exceptions. Right tackles are generally better power blockers in run sets and run-action, too.

    For the most part, the NFL's best right tackles combine strong pass sets with above-average body control and strength against elite edge-rushers, who often line up to face the right tackle play after play. Some could kick over to left tackle in a pinch. The Eagles' plan seems to be for Johnson to take over Jason Peters' left tackle spot in time.

    NFL1000 Offensive Line Scout Duke Manyweather has watched and evaluated every right tackle this season, and he ranked them all based on the following criteria:

    Pass Protection: 25 points. How does this lineman handle edge-rushers one-on-one? Can he ride a defender in an arc around the pocket? How well does he adjust to maneuvers such as end-tackle stunts? Can he adjust his placement for inside counters? Can he square up against penetrating edge-rushers, allowing his quarterback to make the quick pass?

    Run Blocking: 20 points. Does this lineman pinch inside well to seal the edge? Does he have the power and leverage to drive-block consistently? Can he hit the second level and block his targets to free his running backs at linebacker depth?

    Power: 25 points. Does he put his hands on the defender's numbers and push him back? How is his upper-body strength? Is he strong enough to one-hand his way through a block if a defender does something he doesn't expect?

    Agility: 20 points. Does he have the agility and light feet to move through a blocking progression against a fast, aggressive pass-rusher? Can he block at the second level on screens and other short passes that require vertical movement? How is his footwork on sweeps and pulls? How quick is he off the snap to deal with whatever's in front of him? Can he regroup after a missed block to clean things up?

    Position Value: 10 points. This takes into account positional importance when comparing scores to other spots on the gridiron. Right tackles are given 8/10 points across the board, leaving them with a maximum score of 98/100. 

    Make sure to check out all of the NFL1000 rankings from the 2017 season.



Notable Omissions

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    Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press

    When ranking right tackles, we needed enough snaps to get a true picture of a player's effect on his offense. Those with less than 20 percent of their team's total offensive snaps were excluded from the rankings, including the following players:

    • Seantrel Henderson, Buffalo Bills
    • Ben Ijalana, New York Jets
    • Zach Strief, New Orleans Saints
    • Garry Gilliam, San Francisco 49ers

Nos. 49-46

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    Rick Scuteri/Associated Press

    49. Bobby Hart, New York Giants

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    12/20
    Power: 
    13/25
    Agility: 
    12/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    61/100

    New Giants general manager Dave Gettleman cut Bobby Hart prior to Week 17. He was constantly walked back in pass protection and failed to pass off line games with his guard due to lazy fundamentals. The 23-year-old generated little to no movement in the running game and was often pushed in the backfield. Hart is still young, so it bears watching whether a team is willing to give him a second chance.

          

    48. Menelik Watson, Denver Broncos

    Pass Protection: 15/25
    Run Block: 
    13/20
    Power: 
    14/25
    Agility: 
    12/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    62/100

    Menelik Watson struggled to pass-protect and run-block for Denver before calf and foot injuries sent him to injured reserve in early November. Though the Broncos handed Watson a three-year, $18.4 million deal in free agency last offseason, it quickly became clear that the 29-year-old isn't a long-term answer.

           

    47. Michael Schofield, Los Angeles Chargers

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    13/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    11/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    64/100

    Michael Schofield started five games for the Chargers this season when they had players out due to injury. Otherwise, he's a career backup who struggles to establish himself as a spot starter at swing tackle.

         

    46. Jason Spriggs, Green Bay Packers

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    13/20
    Power: 
    14/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    64/100

    Spriggs struggled with hamstring and knee injuries in 2017, leading the Packers to place him on injured reserve twice. When he did see action in the second half of the season, he showed what he did in his 2016 rookie campaign and back at his days at Indiana. He's a decent pass protector because he's a good athlete who draws into a kick-slide well, but he has major issues with speed-rushers who redirect him or beat him around the pocket. Spriggs' run blocking has never been greatthere were concerns about his play strength in college, and they still show up in the NFL. He'll have to work hard if he ever wants to be more than a swing tackle, especially when it comes to his blocking accuracy and lateral agility.

Nos. 45-41

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    Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images

    45. Allen Barbre, Denver Broncos

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    14/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    65/100

    Allen Barbre proved to be a slight upgrade over Menelik Watson for Denver. Barbre played almost every position on the offensive line and was adequate. The Broncos likely will reevaluate their right tackle position and look to upgrade.

         

    44. Zane Beadles, San Francisco 49ers

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    12/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    66/100

    Zane Beadles filled in for the injured Trent Brown, which was a huge drop-off. Beadles is a career guard, but he has enough savvy to play right tackle. He battled his tail off to stay in front of rushers and to anchor, while he also fought to sustain and strain run blocks.

           

    43. Andre Smith, Cincinnati Bengals

    Pass Protection: 15/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    12/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    66/100

    Andre Smith was once a full-time starter for the Bengals in the early 2010s. He has since become a jack-of-all-trades, plugging in at various positions across the offensive line. Smith has lost some of his athletic ability, which is what made him a vaunted pass protector earlier in his career. He now relies on getting his hands on defenders and leaning on them. Smith still shows the ability to be a powerful run-blocker.

           

    42. Germain Ifedi, Seattle Seahawks

    Pass Protection: 15/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    67/100

    Germain Ifedi's passion and intensity is undeniable, but he led the league in penalties (20), and his overall technique needs a reboot. It starts with Ifedi's stance, which is not functional and has him up on his toes. That makes him susceptible to falling off of blocks when he attempts to engage in the running game. Ifedi's pass set and footwork is inefficient, and it makes his hands even worse.

           

    41. Vadal Alexander, Oakland Raiders

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    15/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    67/100

    Vadal Alexander proved to be a powerful run-blocker in Oakland, but he has his limitations in pass protection, especially against elite pass-rushers. His best position may be as a guard.

Nos. 40-36

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    Al Bello/Getty Images

    40. Chad Wheeler, New York Giants

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    15/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    67/100

    Chad Wheeler's best football is still ahead of him. The New York rookie flashed promise at right tackle in a difficult situation late in the season. Wheeler will need to continue to develop his ground-up fundamentals in pass protection and as a run-blocker, and he must continue to get stronger functionally.

           

    39. LaAdrian Waddle, New England Patriots

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    67/100

    LaAdrian Waddle is an above-average swing tackle. He was able to step in for an injured Marcus Cannon and provide veteran experience as a stopgap starter. Waddle is a natural pass protector who uses his length and athleticism to keep defenders at bay. He gets his hands on defenders and positions them in the run game, but he does not generate consistent movement.

           

    38. Cameron Fleming, New England Patriots

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    67/100

    Cameron Fleming is one of three right tackles that played for New England this season. He is adequate as both a pass protector and a run-blocker, but his lack of consistency prevented him from earning a full-time starting role. Fleming will have the chance to line up and make a statement as the Patriots' starting right tackle in Super Bowl LII on Sunday.

           

    37. Sam Young, Miami Dolphins

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    67/100

    Miami's Sam Young started six games in his eighth year, mostly in place of the injured Ja'Wuan James. Young has a limited skill set, but he can get out of tough situations as a swing tackle. His high pad level allows defenders to leverage him and walk him back, and he did not show the mobility to releverage his hips to regain position.

          

    36. Jake Fisher, Cincinnati Bengals

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    13/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    14/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    67/100

    Jake Fisher was up-and-down this season as as pass protector, as his pass sets and anchor points were inconsistent. He looked to be developing at one point, but then he rapidly regressed, as did the rest of the Bengals offensive line. Former Dallas Cowboys offensive line coach Frank Pollack joined the Bengals in January, which begs the question of how Fisher will adapt moving forward.

Nos. 35-31

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images

    35. Caleb Benenoch, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    14/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    68/100

    Caleb Benenoch showed promise filling in for Demar Dotson. The second-year man must continue to develop core strength to stay engaged in pass protection, and he also needs to improve his hand usage.

          

    34. Marshall Newhouse, Oakland Raiders

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    14/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    68/100

    Marshall Newhouse spent his seventh NFL season on a team that had high expectations heading into the year. He played more physical than ever in the run game, while he adapted a new strictly vertical pass set. Newhouse struggled to strain and finish in the running game when defenders got into his frame. He also had issues anchoring against edge-rushers that used stutter-to-speed moves. The 29-year-old is a functional starter and a true professional.

         

    33. Brent Qvale, New York Jets

    Pass Protection: 15/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    68/100

    Brent Qvale proved to be a dependable spot starter at right tackle for the New York Jets. He is somewhat limited in pass protection and is at his best when he can get his hands on a defender immediately. Qvale is a better run-blocker than he is a pass protector, as his mauling mindset is on full display when he gets off the ball and engages with a defender.

         

    32. Joe Barksdale, Los Angeles Chargers

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    68/100

    Joe Barksdale provided adequate pass protection and good run blocking for the Los Angeles Chargers. Barksdale's pad level causes him to lose power in pass protection, which makes his anchor inconsistent and leaves him to settle for stalemates in the running game. Don't be surprised if the Chargers aim to upgrade the right tackle spot this offseason.

         

    31. Joe Haeg, Indianapolis Colts

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    15/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    68/100

    Joe Haeg started 15 games for Indianapolis and was adequate at right tackle. The second-year man out of North Dakota State showed promise as an edge protector. The Colts were in many obvious pass situations where defenders pinned their ears back to rush the passer, and although Haeg did not surrender many sacks, he had numerous close calls. As a run-blocker, Haeg was able to strike and leverage to get movement at the point of attack, though he did run into some issues securing and sealing the edge.

Nos. 30-26

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    Rick Scuteri/Associated Press

    30. Jared Veldheer, Arizona Cardinals

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    68/100

    Jared Veldheer made the switch from left tackle to right tackle in 2017, which benefited no one. He never found his groove at right tackle, as his pass-set landmarks and anchor points all changed, which caused him major issues in pass protection. It was no better in the running game, as Veldheer struggled to transition to footwork which left him out of position to get his hands inside to leverage. 

          

    29. Brandon Shell, New York Jets

    Pass Protection: 16/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    69/100

    Brandon Shell is a lengthy pass protector who can have success against 75 percent of the NFL's edge-rushers using just his athletic ability. Once Shell figures out how to move efficiently to be in position to effectively time his punch, he may become a top-tier pass protector. Then again, offensive line development in the NFL is no guarantee.

         

    28. Shon Coleman, Cleveland Browns

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    14/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    70/100

    Shon Coleman flashed for the Browns all season, and he continues to build his game. Coleman is a violent run-blocker and shows streaks of physical dominance. He must continue to develop as a pass protector in terms of consistency in his pass-set points and his overall hand usage.

          

    27. Breno Giacomini, Houston Texans

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    12/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    70/100

    Breno Giacomini provided Houston with a consistent veteran presence to man their right edge. Giacomini's best football is behind him, but he still has the same physical mindset and the crafty veteran technique. That helps him find ways to get the job done, even when some of his athletic ability has diminished.

            

    26. Rashod Hill, Minnesota Vikings

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    14/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    71/100

    Rashod Hill provided Minnesota with serviceable reps in extended time at right tackle. Hill is not a lockdown bookend, but he shows enough promise with his length, range, body control and power to develop into a solid starting tackle. He remains raw in the nuances of pass protection, so he'll need to continue developing in that regard. But overall, Hill was a decent run-blocker who generated good initial power and could win on the edge against most defenders.

Nos. 25-21

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    Kirk Irwin/Getty Images

    25. Austin Howard, Baltimore Ravens

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    71/100

    Baltimore signed Austin Howard a few weeks into the season. Howard is a what-you-see-is-what-you-get type of guy. He is big and physical and will play that way even in pass protection. However, Howard struggles with his lateral movement when he faces rushers with some wiggle to them. He is a mauler in the running game and sets a physical tone as a run-blocker.

           

    24. Marcus Cannon, New England Patriots

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    72/100

    Marcus Cannon's season was cut short due to an ankle injury, but the 2016 second-team All-Pro got off to a shaky start in 2017, giving up a number of sacks in seven games. Cannon's pass set was inconsistent, and he often mistimed his strike over his seven appearances. He stood out as a run-blocker, which is likely what New England has missed the most.

           

    23. Will Holden, Arizona Cardinals

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    16/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    72/100

    Will Holden was thrust into action at right tackle for Arizona after injuries shuffled the lineup. Holden showed flashes of being an adequate pass protector and a serviceable run-blocker. He must continue to develop his functional strength and fine-tune his footwork and hand placement.

          

    22. Justin Pugh, New York Giants

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    72/100

    Justin Pugh made the switch back to right tackle for the Giants as they looked for their best five offensive linemen. Pugh more than held his own at his old position, which he originally played during his first couple of seasons in the NFL. He ended up going to injured reserve with a back injury and is set to be a free agent this spring. Much like his fellow Giants offensive linemen, it is unclear whether Pugh has a future in New York.

           

    21. Jordan Mills, Buffalo Bills

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    14/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    73/100

    Buffalo's Jordan Mills is as tough as they come, and he plays with a physical mindset. Mills' pass protection is limited and inconsistent if he is facing speed, but he makes up for with is physical run blocking. Overall, the 27-year-old is an adequate starter. Buffalo knows it can trust Mills to line up and do the right thing, which is what helped him keep a starting job.

Nos. 20-16

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    Justin K. Aller/Getty Images

    20. Mike Remmers, Minnesota Vikings

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    16/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    73/100

    Mike Remmers was the Vikings' best option at right tackle, but he also seemed to be their best option at right guard at various points and left guard down the stretch during a playoff run. Remmers started 11 games in the regular season and had success at right tackle in the limited reps he had. According to our charting, he did not surrender a sack. Remmers was physical and got after people on the edge in the running game, especially drive blocking. (The same could be said for his reps at guard as well.) Remmers is clearly among the Vikings' five best offensive linemen, but it remains unclear which position he'll man moving forward.

           

    19. Justin McCray, Green Bay Packers

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    14/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    16/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    73/100

    Justin McCray was one of several tackles Green Bay used to fill the void that opened when Bryan Bulaga went to injured reserve. McCray would not pass an eye test when it comes to his stature, but he battled and was often in position to have success. He showed the ability to set and expand set points to cut off rushers, and he has the feet and lateral agility to mirror and stay in front of defenders. McCray did struggle with lengthy and explosive pass-rushers who used the long-arm stab technique, as he allowed them into his chest. McCray was solid in the running game, latching on with hands inside to leverage and drive. He may be limited, but is a versatile pro who can fill numerous roles.

         

    18. Ja'Wuan James, Miami Dolphins

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    73/100

    Ja'Wuan James had some early-season success for Miami, but as the year progressed, his performance became inconsistent, much as the Dolphins team did as a whole. James showed good agility and range in pass protection, but he had success when he could short-set and get his hands on defenders. He was at his best in the running game when he won the hand-placement battle and maintained leverage. James was placed on injured reserve after Week 9 with a hamstring injury, snapping his streak of 25 consecutive starts.

         

    17. Chris Hubbard, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    74/100

    Chris Hubbard did a serviceable job filling at right tackle for Pittsburgh during Marcus Gilbert's suspension. With the exception of a violent punch, Hubbard is not great at any one particular thing, but he played with fundamentals and enough physicality to have success as a run-blocker and a pass protector. He is a quality swing tackle who should always have a job, and he may even be able to kick down inside at guard in a pinch.

          

    16. La'el Collins, Dallas Cowboys

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    17/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    74/100

    La'el Collins made the switch from left guard to right tackle in 2017 for Dallas, and he had his full complement of elite edge-rushers to play against every week. Collins got off to a rough start early in the season, as he was too aggressive in pass protection, which left him susceptible to the speed rush and double moves countering back to the inside. But as the season progressed, so did Collins. After the season, Dallas hired longtime Bengals offensive line coach Paul Alexander, which makes Collins' development moving forward worth watching.

Nos. 15-11

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images

    15. Rick Wagner, Detroit Lions

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    74/100

    At various points of the season, Detroit's Rick Wagner underperformed for his new team. He struggled with his pass-set points and anchor in the first half of the season, and he was marginal at best as a run-blocker. He eventually got it together before he suffered an ankle injury in Week 13 against his former team, the Baltimore Ravens. Wagner missed the next three games, but he returned against the Green Bay Packers in Week 17. It was an up-and-down season for Wagner, but the talent is still there, as he flashed promising power and the ability to be a good pass protector at times. Wagner will need to be more consistent in 2018 for Detroit to be successful.

           

    14. Bobby Massie, Chicago Bears

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    16/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    75/100

    Bobby Massie was inconsistent at the start of the 2017 season, but he settled in after Week 5 and put together a solid string of games. When Massie is on, he looks like one of the NFL's top right tackles at times, displaying tremendous range in pass protection and a violent strike. In the running game, Massie won with power and physicality when he maintained leverage.

           

    13. Morgan Moses, Washington Redskins

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    75/100

    Washington's Morgan Moses got off to a great start, but he battled a pair of ankle injuries for most of the season, which impacted his level of play. Moses showed tremendous range in pass protection with a strong anchor, but he ran into issues mirroring and changing directions with the ankle sprains. In the running game, Moses was still highly effective at winning the edge with footwork, hand placement and power. He showed the ability to work with his right guard to displace the point of attack on double-teams and was also effective blocking second-level defenders.

         

    12. Rob Havenstein, Los Angeles Rams

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    75/100

    Los Angeles Rams tackle Rob Havenstein had a bounce-back season after his injury-ravaged 2016 campaign. Havenstein is not blessed with outstanding physical traits or athleticism, but he understands the nuances of pass protection and always seem to be in position to strike and anchor against most pass-rushers. However, he did struggle with speed off the edge at times. Havenstein was solid as a run-blocker, quickly engaging to control defenders and using his size and power to strain the block. 

           

    11. Jack Conklin, Tennessee Titans

    Pass Protection: 17/25
    Run Block: 
    18/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    76/100

    Jack Conklin followed up a solid 2016 rookie campaign with an impressive second season in Tennessee. He's a physical run-blocker who can create a new line of scrimmage in one-on-one situations. Conklin plays with the power and hand placement to fully control defenders when he gets into them. In pass protection, Conklin showed more consistency and understanding of pass-set landmarks than he did as a rookie, which led to the Titans giving him more opportunities to protect on an island. However, Conklin still has his issues against explosive pass-rushers that can bend and run the hoop. Unfortunately, Conklin suffered a torn ACL in the playoffs, throwing his 2018 outlook into question.

10. Trent Brown, San Francisco 49ers

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    Jeff Haynes/Associated Press

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    17/20
    Power: 
    20/25
    Agility: 
    13/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    76/100

    Trent Brown took over as the full-time starter at right tackle for San Francisco in 2016 and showed flashes of what he could eventually become. In 10 games as a starter this past season, he built further upon that before a shoulder injury prematurely ended his year.

    Few players can match the 6'8", 355-pounder's size and raw power when he sets his hands. Brown is surprisingly agile and can effortlessly change directions when fatigue is not a factor. He is able to get to his landmark to intercept rushers, and he delivers a powerful punch that stones many defenders. In the running game, Brown uses his size and power to maul defenders off the ball, and he does a tremendous job of using his hands and hip explosion to strike, leverage, drive and finish defenders. 

    Since fatigue limited Brown somewhat, the third-year man must continue to work on getting his body to its leanest state to maintain optimal performance. When fatigue sets in, Brown's level of play drops off, and the combination of that and his size makes him more susceptible to injury.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

        

    Brown does indeed have impressive speed off the snap and agility through the play for a man his size, but one also wonders how special he could be if he lopped off 20-30 pounds. Though he's an excellent drive blocker and can mirror a pass-rusher well through the first half of the pocket, Brown tends to struggle when finishing plays, as quicker defenders can get around him. This can be the case whether he's dealing with an inside counter or fending off a defensive tackle as he's pinching inside to spring a running back to the outside of the formation.          

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

9. Jermey Parnell, Jacksonville Jaguars

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    John Raoux/Associated Press

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    15/20
    Power: 
    20/25
    Agility: 
    15/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    76/100

    Jacksonville's Jermey Parnell turned in his best season as a full-time starter in 2017. The long and physical tackle missed three games with a knee injury after he was hurt on the second-to-last play in a Week 9 victory over Cincinnati, but he returned in Week 13 to help lead the Jaguars to victory over the Colts.

    Parnell is at his best when he can unload his strike and jolt defenders in pass protection, but he does show the range to cut edge-rushers off at the top of their rush. Where he gets in trouble is when he is too aggressive and makes himself susceptible to an inside counter or a double hand swipe to his edge. In the running game, Parnell generates power at the point of attack and is able to strike, leverage, drive and finish defenders. Heplays with a nasty disposition and sets the tone for the physical Jacksonville offensive line.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

          

    Parnell is an ideal tackle for the offense the Jaguars prefer to run, as he's a technically sound mauler who enjoys latching onto a defender and pushing him back. Especially effective in short-yardage and goal-line situations, Parnell is also a workable pass-blocker who jumps into his stance and has developed adaptive strategies to get around his top-heavy build and his lack of ideal mobility. Parnell wouldn't be a first choice in a fast-break offense with a prolific passing attack, but he's one of the smartest power-blockers in the league.

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

8. Ryan Schraeder, Atlanta Falcons

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    Winslow Townson/Associated Press

    Pass Protection: 18/25
    Run Block: 
    17/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    16/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    77/100

    Ryan Schraeder's journey from Division II Valdosta State to Atlanta Falcons starter is one of the better success stories in the NFL.

    Schraeder plays with a perfect balance of controlled aggression and calculated patience. He uses his length and agility to be a solid pass protector, although he does run into trouble when defenders get under his pads and he is unable to releverage his hands to gain control. Schraeder is powerful in the running game and is able to torque and forcefully turn defenders off of the edge while also tracking and executing blocks in space.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    Atlanta's offense was far less explosive under new offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian than it had been under Kyle Shanahan, but Schraeder's game was one example of improvement in 2017. He showed better footwork, allowing him to be more agile and adaptable to the defender, and he's able to match that agility with strength in the run game. Schraeder will never be one of the league's most powerful blockers, but he's developed into one of the most reliable at his position.

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

7. Marcus Gilbert, Pittsburgh Steelers

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    Justin K. Aller/Getty Images

    Pass Protection: 19/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    17/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    78/100

    Pittsburgh's Marcus Gilbert still managed to rank among the NFL's best right tackles this season despite serving a four-game suspension for violating the league's policy against performance-enhancing drugs and missing five other games due to a hamstring injury. When he was on the field, the Steelers averaged 27 points per game, while they scored only 20.2 points per game without him.

    Gilbert touts an explosive pass set and a violent strike which stops defenders in their tracks. His lower-body strength and leverage help him anchor consistently. In the running game, Gilbert shows strength, power, explosion and good lateral agility, which allowed him to generate movement at the point of attack, cut off the backside when the run goes away, win the edge and block in space.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    It took Gilbert a while for his technique to match his raw power and athleticism, but he's eliminated a lot of the rough spots in his game. At 6'6" and 329 pounds, Gilbert has the perfect build for his position, and though he can be pushed back at times by stronger ends and tackles, he's also one of the NFL's most mobile and agile right tackles. That makes him a perfect fit for a Steelers offense that combines deep passing drops with a power run game.

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

6. Ryan Ramczyk, New Orleans Saints

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    Chris Keane/Associated Press

    Pass Protection: 19/25
    Run Block: 
    17/20
    Power: 
    17/25
    Agility: 
    17/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    78/100

    There was not a more impressive rookie offensive lineman than Ryan Ramczyk. He started off the season at left tackle, but after an early-season injury to veteran Zach Strief, the Saints slid the rookie to the right side, and it paid huge dividends. Ramczyk combines a combination of prototypical physical traits and a polished skill set, which you do not often see from a rookie.

    Ramczyk was efficient with his pass set and was able to reach his landmark to consistently punch and anchor. Early in the season, he did run into some inconsistencies in his pass set, but he was able to effectively mirror and take away the inside if a defender countered. In the running game, Ramczyk was just as efficient with his footwork and accurate with his hand usage.

    Ramczyk showed the ability to reach or angle-drive-block while also working in-line angles to cut off the back side when the run went away. The powerful base and force he generated allowed him to strike, leverage, drive and finish often in the run game. Ramczyk may have been the best tackle at straining blocks so that defenders could not get back into the play. The Saints got a good one in Ramczyk and should be excited about his continual development.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    It's not often that a rookie offensive lineman can come into a complicated NFL offense and excel from the start, but Ramczyk took that challenge and ran with it. New Orleans' offense requires its offensive linemen to combine power, speed and positional awareness at a high level, and Ramczyk showed the aptitude for all of it. He drives and seals well in the run game, has the technique to shut down edge-rushers without tight end help and can get downfield with aggression and accuracy.

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

5. Demar Dotson, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images

    Pass Protection: 20/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    17/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    79/100

    Demar Dotson quietly had a solid season down in Tampa Bay. The problem, which has been the case often with Dotson, is he has not been able to put together a full season because of injuries. Dotson started the first 11 games, and our charting has him down for surrendering only 2.5 sacks during that stretch, before he was place on injured reserve after Week 12 at Atlanta.

    Dotson is a lengthy (6'9") pass protector. He showed an explosive pass set that can cover a wide range. He did a great job at setting to his landmark and striking edge defenders and was able to anchor quickly. When defenders attempted to run the hoop, Dotson showed the feet to trace the hoop and use his length to run rushers past the quarterback. Overall in the running game, Dotson showed the strength and explosion at the point of attack to leverage and drive defenders while also showing the footwork and hand placement to reach or angle-drive opponents to win the edge.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    Dotson has a lean frame, but he plays with a wide base, allowing him to show all the quickness and agility necessary for second-level blocking and tackle pulls while also dealing well with edge-rushers and peeling defenders back in the run game. Dotson gets frequent tight end help in Tampa Bay's offensive concepts, but he doesn't need it—when he latches onto a defender, he's one of the more decisive blockers in the league. 

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

4. Bryan Bulaga, Green Bay Packers

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    Jeff Haynes/Associated Press

    Pass Protection: 21/25
    Run Block: 
    16/20
    Power: 
    18/25
    Agility: 
    16/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    79/100

    Bryan Bulaga graded out as the fourth-best right tackle despite only playing in five games. He battled a high ankle sprain early in the season and then missed time with a concussion before he suffered a season-ending torn ACL in Week 9. Even working through an high ankle sprain, Bulaga still proved to be the cream of the crop when it came to pass protection. A big reason for this was Bulaga's ability to use expanded pass-set points to reach landmarks, and when delivering his punch, he did not try to do too much.

    Bulaga was able to strike, leverage, drive and finish defenders in the running game with a powerful base and good rotational strength to turn defenders out of the gap, often knocking them off balance. Bulaga and right guard Jahri Evans generated good vertical movement on combo blocks and showed the awareness to slip off and fit on linebackers at the second level. There is no question Bulaga is still a top offensive tackle when healthy, but Green Bay has shown a history of parting ways with veteran offensive linemen.

    At 28, if Bulaga comes back full strength, there should be plenty of football left in the tank for the eighth-year man out of Iowa. The future may not necessarily be as a Packer, but there should be a large a market for the veteran if it comes down to it.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    When healthy, Bulaga is one of the NFL's better pass-blocking right tackles and an ideal fit for an offense in which the quarterback makes a lot of quick passes to his right side and challenges his blockers by scrambling outside the structure of the play. Bulaga does a great job of catching the defender as he comes through to the pocket, and he's a strong run-blocker as long as he keeps his target in front of him. 

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

3. Daryl Williams, Carolina Panthers

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    Winslow Townson/Associated Press

    Pass Protection: 19/25
    Run Block: 
    17/20
    Power: 
    20/25
    Agility: 
    16/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    80/100

    Carolina's Daryl Williams took a huge step forward with consistent performance, which earned him second-team All-Pro honors. The third-year man out of Oklahoma has established himself as a powerful run-blocker while also proving to be a more than adequate pass protector. Despite his massive frame (6'6", 330 lbs), Williams showed the efficiency in his pass set, foot quickness and range to bookend against some of the NFL's most explosive edge-rushers while also displaying the body control, mobility and lateral agility to recover when defenders moved him off his spot.

    Williams flashed dominant moments in the running game, generating good power at the point of attack to quickly strike, leverage and drive defenders off the line of scrimmage. In past seasons, Williams' conditioning seemed to be his limiting factor. That was not the case in 2017. 

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    Built like a fireplug, Williams uses his quick feet to gain the advantage right from the snap. He's able to jump into the right gap to protect or run-block, and as long as he keeps his feet active and under control, he's hard to move. Williams has the potential to move even higher up this list as an ideal fit in Carolina's power-based schemes. 

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

2. Mitchell Schwartz, Kansas City Chiefs

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    Peter G. Aiken/Getty Images

    Pass Protection: 20/25
    Run Block: 
    17/20
    Power: 
    19/25
    Agility: 
    17/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    81/100

    In consecutive seasons, Mitchell Schwartz of Kansas City tied for second-team All-Pro honors. He is as steady as they come, and the Chiefs lean on his consistency. Schwartz's smooth vertical pass set allows him to set the depth of the pocket to detour defenders. He shows good range to cover ground and expand set points when rushers attempt to run the hoop.

    Schwartz does a good job of explosively punching and recoiling to slow defenders and keep them out of his frame and has become surgical with his ability to take away the "long-arm" stab. Run blocking is an area of Schwartz's game that continues to improve, especially his finishing.

    Schwartz showed the footwork to use in-line angles and the hand placement to effectively reach, hook and work his hips around to seal edge defenders, or angle-drive-block players to the sideline when they had him out-leveraged. Schwartz had just one rough outing when matched against Demarcus Lawrence in Week 9 at Dallas.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    The Chiefs have greatly expanded several elements of their offense in the last two seasons—backfield motion, an option-flavored run game and deep passes predicated off play action. All of those things present specific challenges to Kansas City's blockers, and Schwartz has shown a great aptitude for it all. He gets in his pass sets quickly and smoothly as you would expect a high-quality tackle to do, he seals the edge for the run game, and he's mobile and accurate enough on the hoof to take second-level defenders out of the play. Put simply, this offense wouldn't work as well as it does without Schwartz's efforts. 

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

1. Lane Johnson, Philadelphia Eagles

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images

    Pass Protection: 21/25
    Run Block: 
    18/20
    Power: 
    19/25
    Agility: 
    18/20
    Position Value: 
    8/10
    Overall Grade: 
    84/100

    Philadelphia's Lane Johnson was a huge key to the Eagles' Super Bowl LII run. His performance not only earned first-team All-Pro honors but also led to him being our top graded right tackle of the season. Johnson always appeared to be comfortable in pass protection, displaying good patience, accurate strike-zone recognition and above-average hand usage, all of which factored in to him surrendering just 12 pressures and two sacks according to our own charting process. Johnson possesses an explosive pass set that covered the necessary ground to reach landmarks, cutting off edge defenders.

    He effectively short sets firmly to the line of scrimmage, getting his hands on defenders to keep rushers off balance as a change up while consistently showing a strong anchor. Johnson shows the strength, power and explosion at the point of attack to knock defenders off the ball when asked to base-block or angle-drive-block. Johnson shows the ability to generate force from the ground by driving through his in-steps to strike, leverage, drive and finish defenders when moving the point of attack or breaking stalemates.

    —NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

         

    When the Eagles selected Johnson fourth overall in the 2013 draft, the idea was that he would eventually replace stalwart Jason Peters at the left tackle spot. But when Peters went down with a torn ACL and MCL in October, the team kept Johnson at his right tackle spot and watched Halapoulivaati Vaitai develop well enough on the left side after some rough early reps.

    Johnson does have the attributes to play left tackle, but leaving him on the right side indicates how highly the Eagles value the right tackle position. When Carson Wentz was healthy, the Eagles lived off front-side scramble plays to a large degree, and now that Nick Foles has replaced Wentz, an increasing reliance on run-pass options means that Foles has to have a clear view to his right side. Johnson is the most important blocker on this line and a primary reason the Eagles are in the Super Bowl.  

    —NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar