NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Draft's Top OGs

Matt Miller@nfldraftscoutNFL Draft Lead WriterApril 6, 2017

NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Draft's Top OGs

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    Don Juan Moore/Getty Images

    The 2017 NFL draft class features elite talents at the top of the board in Myles Garrett and Leonard Fournette. After that? This is one of the deepest classes in the six years I've been scouting at Bleacher Report.

    Stacking the board top to bottom for the '17 class was no easy task. There are a legitimate record-breaking number of first-round talents on my board. Outside of Round 1, it was easy to imagine putting 60 of the top players into the top 40. If you can't find starters in Round 4 of this class, you're doing it wrong.

    So who is the best overall? How about the best at each position? The goal of the NFL Draft 400 series is to figure that out.

    The top 400 players were tracked, scouted, graded and ranked by me and my scouting assistants, Marshal Miller and Dan Bazal, and Connor Rogers. Together, we viewed tape of a minimum of three games per player (the same standard NFL teams use). Oftentimes, we saw every play by a prospect over the last two years. That led to the grades, rankings and scouting reports you see here.

    Players were graded on strengths and weaknesses, with a pro-player comparison added to match the player's style or fit in the pros. The top 400 players will be broken down position by position for easy viewing before the release of a top-400 big board prior to the draft.

    In the case of a tie, players were ranked based on their overall grade in our top 400.

Matt Miller's NFL Draft Grading Scale

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    At the end of each scouting report, you'll see a final grade that falls somewhere between 4.00 and 9.00. This scale comes from the teaching I received from Charley Casserly, Michael Lombardi and other former and current front-office personnel in the NFL. I tweaked it this year to be more transparent, and as a result, each player received a number grade as well as a ranking.

    This applies to all positions across the board.

    Matt Miller's NFL Draft Grading Scale
    GradeLabel
    9.00Elite—No. 1 pick
    8.00-8.99All-Pro—Rare Talent
    7.50-7.99Round 1—Pro Bowl Potential
    7.00-7.49Round 1—Top-15 Player Potential
    6.50-6.99Round 2—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    6.00-6.49Round 3—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    5.80-5.99Round 3-4—Future Starter
    5.70-5.79Round 4—Backup Caliber
    5.60-5.69Round 5—Backup Caliber
    5.30-5.59Round 6—Backup Caliber
    5.10-5.25Round 7—Backup Caliber
    5.00Priority Free Agent
    4.50-4.99Camp Player

18. Erik Magnuson, Michigan

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    Paul Sancya/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4 ½"303 lbs5.27s32 "9 "

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Michigan, Erik Magnuson has solid technique. He can snap his hips and has the flexibility there to drop his weight and anchor or open his hips and get outside the box on pulls and traps. His body control, patience, timing and poise are all NFL-caliber. Magnuson doesn't make mistakes at the college level and is a dependable blocker no matter the play call. He has enough all-around tools to get the job done with crafty technique and angles.

    NEGATIVES

    Magnuson is short-armed and a poor athlete. The two are a bad combination. A college right tackle for the last two seasons, his best chance at making an NFL roster is at right guard, where his poor length and movement skills can be covered. A lack of athleticism to properly battle NFL speed and power is a concern. Magnuson doesn't have the lower-body strength to sit down and shut down inside rushers with power, and in space he's a liability to reach (with length or agility) the corner. He projects as an NFL backup.

    PRO COMPARISON: Andrew Donnal, Los Angeles Rams

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

17. Greg Pyke, Georgia

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    Mark Humphrey/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"330 lbs5.28s33 ¼"9 "

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Georgia, Greg Pyke played both right guard and right tackle with the entire 2016 season spent on the outside. He has ideal NFL size at 6'5" and 330 pounds. Pyke will get a bump from teams that value versatility given his ability to play either right side position. While Pyke wasn't invited to the combine, his pro-day numbers were solid. He backs that up on film with good movement from guard on pulls, and at tackle he's shown he can get out in the screen game.

    NEGATIVES

    Pyke blocks like an armless man. He doesn't attempt to use his length and will instead look to butt heads or ram his chest into a defender. It's a 1930s style of shoulder-blocking and not what is used in the NFL today with reach and arms so dominant. A classic waist-bender, Pyke doesn't know how to play with his rear down and has little lower-body power to push and drive a defender off the ball. When asked to really open his hips and sink, it's not there.

    PRO COMPARISON: Geoff Schwartz, retired

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

16. Corey Levin, Chattanooga

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"307 lbs5.16s33 ½"10 "

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter who played both left tackle and left guard at UT-Chattanooga, Corey Levin has ideal measurables at 6'4" and 307 pounds. He tested well athletically at the combine, showing the kind of numbers NFL scouts want across the board. With 33 ½-inch arms and 10 ⅞-inch hands, Levin passes muster. His ability to play both guard and tackle will immediately add to his value as a pro. Levin projects well as a swing tackle but could be a third guard too. He uses his hands well and is tough at the point of attack in the run game. As a pass protector, Levin has a nasty streak and will dump defenders.

    NEGATIVES

    Poor body control shows up often on Levin's film. When asked to play against higher competition, he didn't show the reach or strength to control pro-style defensive linemen. In space he can be unbalanced and struggle to play smooth football. When defenders get inside Levin's frame, he's subject to being moved around and beaten with a strong second move. His technique, especially in his stance and base play, can be improved with NFL coaching that could allow him to get in a lineup sooner.

    PRO COMPARISON: Evan Boehm, Arizona Cardinals

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

15. Kyle Kalis, Michigan

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    Tony Ding/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"303 lbs5.38s33 "10 "

    POSITIVES

    A 42-game starter over the last four seasons at Michigan, Kyle Kalis has excellent run game blocking skills. A tough player with the power you want to push the pile, Kalis is great at firing out and drive-blocking a head-up defender out of the hole. He's super aggressive and plays with a mean streak. Kalis has NFL bloodlines—his dad Todd played in the NFL for eight years. Kalis has the technique to play in the NFL. He's a smart, conditioned blocker with ideal poise and patience.

    NEGATIVES

    Kalis doesn't have polished lower-body mechanics as a blocker. He's often caught wide or with his chest out over his toes. When he has to reach defenders, his lack of length can be an issue, and he'll start lunging. Kalis has to learn to play disciplined with leverage and body control. He can get over-aggressive at times and lose his base. For a tall, lean guard, he has poor hip flexibility and too often plays tall.

    PRO COMPARISON: Joe Dahl, Detroit Lions

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

14. Ethan Cooper, Indiana-Penn

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'2 ½"322 lbs5.36s32 "10 "

    POSITIVES

    One of the youngest offensive line prospects in the draft, Ethan Cooper will turn 22 years old this summer. NFL teams will be intrigued by his three years of starting at left guard. Cooper definitely looks the part of a stout, powerful guard at 6'2 ½" and 322 pounds with 32 ⅝-inch arms and big hands at 10 ⅜ inches. He moves well enough to all directions from his spot at left guard. He can pull, trap, kick out on screens and get upfield to put his hands on linebackers with good quickness and balance. Cooper's awareness and instincts look good on film against low competition.

    NEGATIVES

    The competition Cooper faced isn't close to NFL quality. It's hard to tell if his dominating people on film is due to him or the players he's facing. Most short interior linemen play with good leverage from a naturally low center of gravity, but that's not the case with Cooper, who plays with a stiffness not expected. As a puncher, you don't see consistent placement or timing. He'll need to work a lot on his hand use. Cooper has some workable qualities, but his lack of length and the huge change in level of competition make him a late-round or undrafted free agent project.

    PRO COMPARISON: Senio Kelemete, New Orleans Saints

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

13. Erik Austell, Charleston Southern

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'3"301 lbs5.21s32"9"

    POSITIVES

    A college left tackle at Charleston Southern, Erik Austell looks to make an inside move in the NFL—potentially to guard or center. As an athlete, Austell has the goods to handle quicker NFL defenders. His footwork is very light and very sound. His football instincts grade out well, especially coming from a small school. An ideal zone-blocking player given his quickness and lack of great size, Austell has the body control and balance to be good on the move. A developmental prospect, Austell has the quick feet and instincts to make him a player worth investing in late.

    NEGATIVES

    The Big South conference doesn't prepare you for the NFL, and Austell will have a heavy load of learning to do against much better defensive personnel and game-planning. Austell lacks the length of a tackle (32-inch arms) but doesn't have the power of a guard. That could mean a move to center but his small hands can be an issue there. On film, that lack of play power definitely shows up. You won't see Austell stonewall defenders in the hole. A stalemate with a head-up defender is a win here.

    PRO COMPARISON: Ronald Leary, Denver Broncos

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Developmental Prospect—Round 7)

12. Cameron Lee, Illinois State

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"312 lbs5.36s33 "10 "

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Illinois State, Cameron Lee popped onto the scene with a strong 2016 campaign. Having played both guard and tackle in college, Lee brings versatility as a late-round prospect. At 6'5" and 312 pounds he has solid length (33 ⅞") and big hands (10 ⅞"). Lee is a tough, physical blocker with a finisher mentality. He has the upper-body power to dominate small-school defenders at the point of attack. When he gets his hands on a defender, it can be lights out. His football IQ and awareness are much better than expected coming from the Missouri Valley conference.

    NEGATIVES

    Lee didn't impress athletically on film or in workouts. His movement skills are limited, and he's not agile enough to be much of a threat on pulls or traps. Playing right guard, he's not twitchy enough to kick out and lead on tosses or screen plays. Leverage and pad height are issues that must be cleaned up before he's ready to handle NFL talent—something he didn't see in college. Learning to play with a flat back and bent knees will be a rookie-year project. Lee doesn't pop off the tape with explosive skills or great technique. His effort and toughness could get him drafted, but he'll have to battle to make a roster.

    PRO COMPARISON: Dallas Thomas, Philadelphia Eagles

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

11. Sean Harlow, Oregon State

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    Tony Avelar/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"303 lbs5.15s32"9 ½"

    POSITIVES

    Sean Harlow started for four seasons at Oregon State, playing as a true freshman at right tackle and eventually splitting his remaining starts between the left and right side. A college tackle only, Harlow projects best inside due to his 32-inch arms. Harlow did 26 reps on the bench press, and that power and explosion show in his upper body. He can latch on and move defenders with his core and arm strength. His hand strength on punches and when gripping in the run game is impressive. Harlow is a worker and a finisher in his blocks. He's relentless in positioning himself and working to seal off defenders in the run game.

    NEGATIVES

    A smaller, undersized guard prospect at 6'4" and 303 pounds. Harlow doesn't have great size or great power, and it shows in his blocks. Harlow may lack the size and lower-body strength to crack a lineup unless he's used in a zone scheme—in which he would have to improve his lateral quickness and flexibility. His heavy feet make pulls and traps a problem, and at tackle he was often behind the count when trying to beat pass-rushers off the edge. Without much arm length, Harlow has to be a blocker with his feet, but against NFL talent he's a step slow for that game. He looks like a great locker room player and potential high-end backup, but not a starter.

    PRO COMPARISON: Tom Compton, Chicago Bears

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

10. Damien Mama, USC

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    Jae C. Hong/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'3 ½"334 lbs5.75s35"11"

    POSITIVES

    A starter as a true freshman at USC, Damien Mama was an early entry into the 2017 draft. His massive frame makes him appealing from a physical standpoint. At 6'3 ½", Mama weighed in at 334 very solid pounds with 35-inch arms and 11-inch hands. Those numbers make scouts drool. In a tight space, Mama can dominate. He uses his length well and has a stout, strong foundation to punch from. He'll roll on defenders when he's exploding off the line and is able to get his hands set into their frame. There's enough of a mean streak here that Mama takes it personally if he's beaten and has great recovery skills within a game. He looks to pound defenders into the grass. Mama is ideal in a power scheme and could play either left or right guard. His blocking tools are NFL-ready. If he's dialed in to the program, he's a rookie starter.

    NEGATIVES

    Movement skills are a major weakness for Mama. He's fine in a short, straight line, but when asked to shuffle or slide laterally he doesn't have the quickness to keep pace. Weight control is another issue, as Mama was once 400 pounds. Leverage and pad height are issues to watch with Mama and will need to be developed. Before the 2016 season, Mama lost his starting job and had to reclaim it. You'd like to see better knee bend and pop from Mama out of his stance. He can get too upright and will struggle to move his feet to keep up with quick 3-technique rushers. A time of 5.75 seconds in the 40-yard dash is horribly slow.

    PRO COMPARISON: Tre' Jackson, New England Patriots

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

9. Jordan Morgan, Kutztown

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'3"309 lbs5.36s34 "10"

    POSITIVES

    Jordan Morgan was a four-year starter at left tackle for Kutztown. In the NFL he'll make the move to guard, where his exceptional length (34 ⅝-inch arms) and impressive athleticism will make him a very nice developmental prospect. Morgan's footwork is that of a tackle. He's quick moving laterally, can explode upfield and has the recovery athleticism to catch up to defenders if beaten off his spot. A tough guy on the field, Morgan is a finisher with an aggressive, urgent style of play. He's an efficient, smart blocker with good angles and the natural tools to be developed into a starting guard. Morgan is not a plug-and-play guy but a Year 2 project at either guard spot.

    NEGATIVES

    The lack of elite competition Morgan faced in college could mean an elongated acclimation period in the NFL. His stance can be unbalanced, and his overall pass-protection technique needs NFL attention. Keeping his body under control and not lunging to reach defenders is a habit Morgan will have to learn in the NFL, as he was able to get away with sloppy technique in a lower conference. Playing with poise is something Morgan has to figure out—how to dial back the aggressiveness at times without losing his edge. Coming out of his stance with his eyes up and his body under control is a must.

    PRO COMPARISON: Justin Pugh, New York Giants

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Developmental Prospect—Round 6)

8. Jessamen Dunker, Tennessee State

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    Gregory Payan/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"318 lbs4.98s33 ½"10"

    POSITIVES

    A transfer from Florida, Jessamen Dunker started for four seasons at Tennessee State, playing both guard spots and left tackle. Dunker is a very good athlete with nice movement skills from a lean frame. He plays with the balance and poise you want in space. His hip flexibility ranks high, and his change of direction skills match that. His quickness allows him to beat defenders off the ball in the pass and run games. His punch is solid, but a lack of length makes him a better move blocker who can mirror and slide to keep his body between the defender and the quarterback. Lateral quickness, overall athleticism and upside are all selling points for Dunker.

    NEGATIVES

    Dunker was arrested as a freshman at Florida for grand theft auto of a motor scooter and suspended; he then transferred from the program. Coming from a small school, Dunker hasn't seen NFL talent or pro-level scheming. He's been able to coast on athleticism and hasn't developed the timing and angles of a top-end blocker. He'll have an acclimation period when coming into the NFL that could sit him down for a year or two. His awareness and instincts rank as average, as do his hand placement and accuracy with his punch. Dunker played tackle in college but is a guard in the NFL due to a lack of length.

    PRO COMPARISON: Brian Winters, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.80/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 4)

7. Nico Siragusa, San Diego State

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"319 lbs5.28s33 ½"10 "

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter, Nico Siragusa looks the part right out of the gate. At 6'4" and 319 pounds he has an NFL build with a powerful upper body. Siragusa impressed at the Senior Bowl with his power and ability to lock out defenders with his arms. Despite not having great length (33 ½-inch arms), he's able to latch on to rushers and shut them down. Siragusa's strength also allows him to absorb bull-rushers and stand up to power. He has a great motor and looks to finish blocks. It's rare to see Siragusa struggle to take a block to the whistle when working in a phone booth. On pulls and traps, Siragusa is quick enough to get outside the box. He has the agility to work in a zone-blocking scheme. Siragusa tested very well at the combine with 28 bench reps, a 32-inch vertical jump and a 4.56 short shuttle.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of balance and control show up often for Siragusa in pass protection. When asked to protect with space around him, he can become top-heavy and start lunging at defenders. Too often in the pass game the play ends with Siragusa on the ground. Working on his pad height to better play with some spring in his hips will improve everything Siragusa does. I worry about his coordination when asked to move laterally against NFL athletes. Despite good quickness, he's not always under control. Speeding up his hands would be a boost to his pass protection tools.

    PRO COMPARISON: John Miller, Buffalo Bills

    FINAL GRADE: 5.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 4)

6. Danny Isidora, Miami

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    John Raoux/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'3"306 lbs5.00s33"9 "

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at right guard, Danny Isidora has impressive athleticism and the tools to become an NFL starter in time. A high-character leader on the Miami team, you won't have to worry about Isidora off the field. He has an ideal NFL body type and enough length (33") at guard from a 6'3", 306-pound frame. His hand strength is solid when he locks horns with a defender, and he can redirect and drive-block once he's gained leverage. Isidora's coordination and burst are major strengths that will allow him to play in either a zone or man scheme moving forward. He shows a high football IQ and the overall strength and athleticism to play in the NFL early on. Isidora has enough of a mean streak and won't get pushed around physically.

    NEGATIVES

    Isidora has been banged up in college, missing time in 2013 with a foot injury. It's not helped that he's played in so many offensive systems either, which limited his development as a blocker. Footwork from Isidora can be inconsistent. He'll over-step often and can struggle to maintain body control on lateral moves. The biggest issue moving forward will be how well Isidora handles power moves in the pros. He can get walked back off his spot and will need to focus on improving his core and base strength.

    PRO COMPARISON: Jerald Hawkins, Pittsburgh Steelers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.20/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 3)

5. Isaac Asiata, Utah

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'3"323 lbs5.34s32"10 "

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at Utah, Isaac Asiata first made it onto the field as a freshman tackle before moving to guard as a sophomore. A short, stout, compact athlete with an exceptional motor, Asiata has the movement skills to plug right into a zone-blocking scheme. Asiata has a mean streak and isn't afraid to fire off the line. He has very good first-step burst and plays with a naturally low center of gravity that helps his leverage. Asiata can get outside the box and make plays in the screen game look easy. If availability is a trait, Asiata scores highly as a career 43-game starter.

    NEGATIVES

    At 6'3" with 32-inch arms, Asiata is a little small for the ideal NFL guard. He'll struggle to reach defenders at tackle and is definitely a projection inside at guard. The mean streak that got praised above can also be a weakness, as Asiata will play wild and out of control. His poise can be shaken, and he'll start ducking his head and firing off without good leverage and pad height. Penalties were an issue for Asiata. After serving a two-year LDS mission, he'll be a 24-year-old rookie. Asiata may be viewed as a zone-only blocker by teams.

    PRO COMPARISON: Shaq Mason, New England Patriots

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 3)

4. Zach Banner, USC

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    Rick Scuteri/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'8 ½"353 lbs5.58s34 "10 ¾"

    POSITIVES

    The biggest player in the 2017 draft class is Zach Banner. At 6'8 ½" and 353 pounds (with 34 ⅞-inch arms and 10 ¾-inch hands), Banner has a massive frame. At that size, he plays with great power and can push, pull and drive defenders out of his path with ease. As a three-year starter at tackle, Banner has experience on both the left and right sides. In pass protection he uses his length very well and has a strong, tight punch. In the run game, watch out. Banner's forward momentum and burst are exceptional, and he'll put defenders on the ground. As a finisher, he's exceptional. Banner is a good overall athlete, especially when you consider his size. He could work as a right tackle in the NFL or move inside to guard.

    NEGATIVES

    Being able to control his weight is a huge (no pun intended) issue. Banner was up to 385 pounds at one time and is still very heavy at 353. He can be heavy-footed and stiff-legged in space and struggles too often to keep his leverage down. If asked to play on the edge as a tackle, Banner doesn't have the quickness to mirror or kick-step to protect the corner. He has to play inside where movement, especially lateral movement, will be limited. Banner has a bad habit of playing with his chest over his toes and must learn to play with better balance—which is terrible for a guard but a fixable issue. Two hip surgeries in his freshman season must be checked. Improving his bend and keeping his weight down will go a long way toward making Banner an NFL starter.

    PRO COMPARISON: Trent Brown, San Francisco 49ers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 3)

3. Dorian Johnson, Pitt

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    Rainier Ehrhardt/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"300 lbs5.27s35 ¼"10 "

    POSITIVES

    Dorian Johnson started for four years at Pitt and has developed into one of the best guards in the nation. He has a great build at 6'5" and 300 pounds with 35 ¼-inch arms and 10 ⅞-inch hands. Johnson is exactly what scouts look for from a physical standpoint. His lower-body explosion is very good, and he can quickly get into defenders out of his stance. Johnson is a super aggressive blocker and plays with the idea that he's going to bury you in the dirt. His football IQ is very high, and as a 42-game starter you can tell he knows what's happening in front of him and around him. Johnson has a clean punch with good power and has a natural, smooth foundation in pass protection. He's poised, balanced and has the agility to handle speed rushers. Johnson's reach gives him a huge advantage in space, as he's able to keep defenders off his frame. Both zone and power schemes should be all over Johnson as a rookie starter.

    NEGATIVES

    Johnson can play out of control at times and has to rein in his anger on the field. He can be in a hurry out of his stance and will get caught standing up or back-bending. Johnson needs to slow down and calm down at times. When he's patient and takes his time, his technique is very good. It's when he hurries that things break down. Improved power would help Johnson's game, as he can struggle to move head-up defenders.

    PRO COMPARISON: Jeff Allen, Houston Texans

    FINAL GRADE: 6.50/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

2. Dan Feeney, Indiana

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    Brynn Anderson/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"300 lbs5.27s35 ¼"10 "

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at Indiana, Dan Feeney has played both guard and right tackle during that time. He's a physical blocker with an excellent mean streak and a finisher mentality. He attacks defenders with first-step quickness and delivers power upon contact. When asked to slide and mirror, Feeney shows the quick feet to get out of his stance and moving. In a zone-blocking scheme he'll be great working down the line of scrimmage. Feeney is tailor-made for zone schemes at either guard spot and should be a plug-and-play starter there. He has enough upper-body strength to manhandle defenders and can punch with power and good accuracy. Feeney's instincts and awareness are very well developed. He's NFL-ready, and as a two-time captain you won't have to worry about his wiring.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of lower-body strength shows up on film and in person, as Feeney is narrow-hipped and could use more attention to leg day. He can be a little stiff-hipped when asked to anchor. When firing off his spot and hitting a head-up defender, Feeney's power can be underwhelming. You expect a mean man to play with more power. Improving his pad height in his burst will help Feeney become more of a power player.

    PRO COMPARISON: Kevin Zeitler, Cleveland Browns

    FINAL GRADE: 6.50/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

1. Forrest Lamp, Western Kentucky

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    HANS PENNINK/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"309 lbs4.98s32 ¼"10 "

    POSITIVES

    A college left tackle, Forrest Lamp best projects inside at guard (or center) in a similar fashion to how Zack Martin and Brandon Scherff moved inside at the next level. Like those two, and even Cody Whitehair last year, Lamp looks like an immediate starter with All-Pro potential. Facing Alabama, Lamp was phenomenal against Jonathan Allen, Tim Williams, Ryan Anderson and Co., proving he can hold his own against top talent. His technique is NFL-ready with excellent balance, poise, timing and body control. His quickness and football IQ make him a tough battle in both the run and passing games. Lamp never panics and does a great job sliding to mirror outside pressure. He's also quick and strong enough to handle countermoves and shut down inside rushers. He should be a rookie starter and a high-level one at that. Lamp is one of the safest picks in the draft.

    NEGATIVES

    Lamp doesn't have great size or length. His arms are just 32 ¼ inches long, and his 309-pound frame could use more bulk. That's why he's projected to make a move to guard or even center. Lamp was largely an angle blocker in college and could struggle early when facing head-up defenders. Getting stronger in his lower body will help his acclimation.

    PRO COMPARISON: Zack Martin, Dallas Cowboys

    FINAL GRADE: 7.00/9.00 (Top 15 Player Potential—Round 1)

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