NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Draft's Top OTs

Matt Miller@nfldraftscoutNFL Draft Lead WriterApril 5, 2017

NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Draft's Top OTs

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images

    The 2017 NFL draft class features elite talents at the top of the board in Texas A&M's Myles Garrett and LSU's Leonard Fournette. After that? This is one of the deepest classes in the six years I've been scouting at Bleacher Report.

    Stacking the board top to bottom for the '17 class was no easy task. There are a legitimate record-breaking number of first-round talents on my board. Outside of Round 1, it was easy to imagine putting 60 of the top players into the top 40. If you can't find starters in Round 4 of this class, you're doing it wrong.

    So who is the best overall? How about the best at each position? The goal of the NFL Draft 400 series is to figure that out.

    The top 400 players were tracked, scouted, graded and ranked by me and my scouting assistants, Marshal Miller and Dan Bazal, and Connor Rogers. Together, we viewed tape of a minimum of three games per player (the same standard NFL teams use). Oftentimes, we saw every play by a prospect over the last two years. That led to the grades, rankings and scouting reports you see here.

    Players were graded on strengths and weaknesses, with a pro-player comparison added to match the player's style or fit in the pros. The top 400 players will be broken down position by position for easy viewing before the release of a top-400 big board prior to the draft.

    In the case of a tie, players were ranked based on their overall grade in our top 400.

Matt Miller's NFL Draft Grading Scale

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    Gene Sweeney Jr./Getty Images

    At the end of each scouting report, you'll see a final grade that falls somewhere between 4.00 and 9.00. This scale comes from the teaching I received from Charley Casserly, Michael Lombardi and other former and current front-office personnel in the NFL. I tweaked it this year to be more transparent, and as a result, each player received a number grade as well as a ranking.

    This applies to all positions across the board.

    Matt Miller's NFL Draft Grading Scale
    GradeLabel
    9.00Elite—No. 1 pick
    8.00-8.99All-Pro—Rare Talent
    7.50-7.99Round 1—Pro Bowl Potential
    7.00-7.49Round 1—Top-15 Player Potential
    6.50-6.99Round 2—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    6.00-6.49Round 3—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    5.80-5.99Round 3-4—Future Starter
    5.70-5.79Round 4—Backup Caliber
    5.60-5.69Round 5—Backup Caliber
    5.30-5.59Round 6—Backup Caliber
    5.10-5.25Round 7—Backup Caliber
    5.00Priority Free Agent
    4.50-4.99Camp Player

21. Cole Croston, Iowa

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    Matthew Holst/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5 ½"314 lbs5.22s32 ¾"9 ½"

    POSITIVES          

    Coming out of Iowa, Cole Croston is going to be well-coached with a high football IQ and a work ethic. That shows up on film too. Croston has the technique, length and power to be a solid late-rounder who could develop into a swing tackle. He's patient in pass protection and understands when to shoot his hands and when to get dirty. Croston is an excellent cut blocker and can be used on the move. In a zone scheme, his lean body and plus athleticism would be benefits. Croston doesn't waste steps and is an efficient blocker.

    NEGATIVES

    A small frame makes Croston's play power less than ideal. He doesn't show great lower-body strength or flexibility. Croston has a thin, narrow lower body that makes the prospect of filling out his frame with more power unlikely. He'll get walked back and can get put on skates when he's not quick enough off the ball to shoot his hands first. In the running game, Croston isn't strong enough to drive-block and too often struggles to move his man.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Erik Pears, Free Agent

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

20. Levon Myers, Northern Illinois

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    Kirk Irwin/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"309 lbs5.34s33"9 "

    POSITIVES

    Levon Myers has the athleticism NFL teams want at the tackle position. He brings some versatility to the table too and could play tackle or guard in the pros. Playing at NIU prepared Myers to be comfortable in space. He'll get down the line with quickness and can kick out edge defenders to fuel outside runs. His awareness and his play speed are solid. He's strong when latching on and taking defenders upfield out of the play. Myers is a strong developmental prospect.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of play power shows up often. Myers is a finesse player who doesn't want to be a drive-blocker at the point of attack. You'll often see him shuffling and not attacking. Poor pad height and stiff hips have him playing tall and bending wrong. Playing tackle, Myers hasn't shown the punch to keep pass-rushers off his body and will surrender his ground too soon. His footwork and his body control are inconsistent, with his balance being an issue when hurried. He has good athleticism but can get sloppy and rush his technique.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Jordan Swindle, Los Angeles Rams

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

19. Justin Senior, Mississippi State

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"331 lbs5.47s34"10 ¼"

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Mississippi State, Justin Senior will turn heads with his strong hands and his movement skills. He's a solid athlete for the tackle position, and at 6'5" and 331 pounds, he has a pro-ready frame. His 34-inch arms and 10 ¼-inch hands are a plus. Senior's ability in pass protection is highlighted by his strong punch and his quick hands. He's a boxer on the corner and will throw jabs with either hand to fight with a defender. He moves well enough laterally to mirror against most SEC pass-rushers. He's a projected NFL right tackle with great length and a strong, nasty punch that will give him a tool to build on as he develops.

    NEGATIVES

    Senior's balance, leverage and pad height are concerns. He'll get rigid in his pass sets but also likes to lunge at defenders. He's a nipples-over-toes blocker and can get his body control off whack. Senior needs work in his technique and his angles. He's not a refined player at this point—notably in pass protection. He's a blank canvas and a good athlete, but he's not Year 1 NFL-ready. Teams should see him only as a developmental prospect given the lack of blocking tools in his game right now.

    PRO COMPARISON: Brandon Shell, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

18. Jylan Ware, Alabama State

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    Credit: Alabama State University
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'7 ½"314 lbs4.92s33 ½"9 ¾"

    POSITIVES

    A sleeper in the 2017 tackle class, Jylan Ware is the kind of player teams grab late in the draft and work for a year to develop his raw tools. Athletically, Ware fits the mold. He's 6'7 ½", 314 pounds and moves effortlessly. His burst, balance and flexibility all pass the eye test. His arms are long, and he has a nice, quick punch with active hands. Those hands also stunned defenders in the Southwestern Athletic Conference with power. He's seen on film knocking defenders off-path with punches from both hands. His timing and his footwork in pass sets show his potential to be very good with coaching. His use of length and power in his hands and his arms is way ahead of where you expect it to be from a small-school tackle. In the running game, Ware has power and plays with enough of a mean streak to dump defenders.

    NEGATIVES

    Playing at Alabama State, Ware has seen zero NFL talent on a regular basis. He has a long, lanky frame that's underdeveloped and will need a redshirt year in the pros to build up his strength. His pass sets can get lazy, and he needs to work on being consistent with his stance and his steps. The stance particularly needs work, as he doesn't have a routine down to get his same foot placement and kick step each time. He's more athlete than technician attacking defenders—which won't work in the NFL without some tools in his toolbox of pass-protection moves. Learning to play with a lower base in the running game will help him build more power.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Le'Raven Clark, Indianapolis Colts

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

17. Storm Norton, Toledo

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    Andrew Weber/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'8"308 lbsN/A35 ¼"10 "

    POSITIVES

    An impressive showing at January's East-West Shrine Game got Storm Norton's name buzzing in draft circles. At 6'8" and 308 pounds, his 35 ¼-inch arms did too. Norton has good balance and poise when hurried. He's a candidate to play left tackle, like he did at Toledo, but could also see a move to the right side. His movement down the line of scrimmage was better than expected for a tall, long-legged tackle. Norton is able to handle speed on the outside when he's on time with his pass set. His length is a major asset, and he times his punches well and lands them with success. Even though he was a two-plus-year starter in college, Norton is a developmental prospect with some upside as a swing tackle.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of play power and leverage are huge question marks. Norton can get run over at the point of attack and must focus on filling out his lean frame and also adding strength in his core and his base. He lacks the sand in his pants to sit down against bull-rushers. Without a strong anchor, Norton is susceptible to power moves but also to countermoves as defenders make him over-set on his outside leg and then counter back inside. Playing from a two-point stance, Norton gets caught with a bent back too often.

    PRO COMPARISON: Taylor Hart, Philadelphia Eagles

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

16. Conor McDermott, UCLA

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    Don Juan Moore/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'8"307 lbs5.15s34 ¾"11"

    POSITIVES

    A two-and-a-half-year starter at left tackle for UCLA, Conor McDermott has NFL bloodlines; his brother, Kevin, long-snaps for the Minnesota Vikings. McDermott definitely looks the part at 6'8", 307 pounds and with massive 11-inch hands and 34 ¾-inch arms. You see his basketball background on the field with his quick feet and his balance. He understands timing, angles and how to move with grace to either meet edge-rushers with his body or how to step and punch to throw them off balance. McDermott is a bouncy player with good movement in space.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of play power is a big concern. McDermott was destroyed when matched up against Myles Garrett because he's susceptible to power and countermoves off hard outside steps. Bull rushes beat him almost every time, and he'll have to learn to play with better leg bend and more power to be an asset against power rushers. For a former basketball player, his movement laterally is clunky when he has to change directions quickly. He's weak on the inside and will be killed by 5-technique defenders. McDermott simply has to get stronger and fill out his lanky frame with good muscle to ever sniff the playing field in the NFL.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Garrett Reynolds, Free Agent

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

15. Avery Gennesy, Texas A&M

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    Rogelio V. Solis/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'3 ½"318 lbs5.35s33 "9 1/2"

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at left tackle for a program that's becoming known as an offensive tackle factory, Avery Gennesy has been on the radar of NFL scouts for a long time. A transfer from East Mississippi Community College, Gennesy was a hot recruit from the JUCO ranks. His ability to hold down the blind side for two years in the SEC is impressive. In a zone scheme, Gennesy's tools would allow him to be successful pulling and working down the line of scrimmage. He shows solid first-step quickness and can come off the line with urgency. His football IQ and his awareness are very high, which could point to a versatile role in the NFL.

    NEGATIVES

    At 6'3 ½" and 318 pounds, Gennesy is undersized for a tackle position. His 33 ⅝-inch arms help the argument that he could play on the edge, but there are few successful tackles in the NFL at his height. Gennesy tested poorly at every level at the combine, which backs up his poor flexibility and quickness seen on tape. Poor explosion, balance, speed and strength are all issues on tape that showed up in testing. Gennesy doesn't have great play strength or toughness, which will greatly limit him in the NFL. He looks like a career backup from an athletic standpoint alone.

     

    PRO COMPARISON: Marshall Newhouse, Oakland Raiders

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

14. Aviante Collins, TCU

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    Mike Stone/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"295 lbs4.81s33 "9 ⅜"

    POSITIVES

    When you run a 4.81 in the 40-yard dash at 6'4" and 295 pounds, you're going to send every scout in the country back to the film room. Aviante Collins did just that with his impressive showing at the combine. Not only did he blaze on the track, but Collins showed good quickness and overall agility in field drills. It's no surprise this son of a sprinter is rising up boards.

    Collins has an athletic frame and is able to easily move on the field to the second level or on pulls and traps. He won't struggle to mirror defenders and has the burst and balance to be effective getting to the corner in pass protection. Collins consistently wins with quickness and angles. He would be an ideal fit in a zone-blocking scheme—in which he could even play left tackle. He's a tough, hard-working player with excellent wiring and a willingness to improve. He already plays with a solid mean streak that he could build upon.

    NEGATIVES

    Collins struggled to hold on to the starting job at TCU over the last four years. He started as a freshman then mostly came off the bench before getting back into the lineup as a senior.

    He missed most of the 2015 season with an injury. Short arms (33 ⅜"), small hands (9 ⅜") and a lean frame make Collins a bit undersized overall. He'll need to add strength to play in the trenches against NFL talent. Already, Collins struggles to anchor against power and isn't strong enough in his base to be a stout power-for-power blocker. Improving his power and his balance—which can come with experience—will be crucial keys for his pro development.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Allen Barbre, Philadelphia Eagles

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Developmental Prospect—Round 6)

13. Jermaine Eluemunor, Texas A&M

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    Bob Levey/Getty Images
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"332 lbs5.22s33 ¼"9 ½"

    POSITIVES

    Jermaine Eluemunor's biggest asset is his strength. Just a one-year starter at Texas A&M, the power he shows playing both right guard and right tackle will open your eyes. His punch, his base and his pure field strength are top-tier. Backing this up, Eluemunor rocked out 34 reps of 225 pounds at the combine.

    His field strength is equally impressive, and Eluemunor will be able to move NFL defenders at the point of attack. His footwork is good enough to make a projection to NFL-level. He can slide and mirror and does a good job of getting turned on pulls and traps when playing guard. One of his biggest strengths may also be his relative newness to playing. Eluemunor started one year of SEC football and has room to develop.

    NEGATIVES

    With just one year of experience, Eluemunor needs time to grow and learn as a blocker. He's a more natural fit at right tackle but could easily play guard in the pros. Hand and arm size were an issue when Eluemunor was measured. He has just 33 ¼-inch arms and 9 ½-inch hands—both are technically over the threshold but aren't great for a 6'4", 332-pound player. Eluemunor appears heavy-footed and stiff-hipped at times in pass protection. That inability to play loose in space could mean a move inside to guard full time once in the pros. At tackle, his poise suffered. He seemed to panic and lose his technique too often when pressured with outside speed. His comfort level appears to be at guard right now, but he's still green enough to potentially develop at right tackle.

     

    PRO COMPARISON: Vadal Alexander, Oakland Raiders

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

12. Collin Buchanan, Miami (OH)

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    Credit: University of Miami (OH)
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"316 lbsN/A32 "10 ½"

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at right tackle, Collin Buchanan has the skills to stick there in the NFL but could also see a move inside to guard. Buchanan plays with a ton of power and has the quick punch to be effective in space when he's not asked to move far off his spot. In a phone booth, he can lock on to defenders and shut them down.

    In the running game, he has a strong foundation and very good power in his first steps. He fires off with low pads and quickly gets his hands set. Balance, punch timing and solid lower-body agility all combine to make Buchanan an interesting developmental prospect on the right side of the line. It's easy to see him working as an NFL starter in the near future after watching him jab at defenders.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of length is a big question mark for Buchanan as a pass protector. With just 32 ⅜-inch arms, he falls below the NFL threshold for tackles. Even on the right side, those shorter arms will severely limit the ability to reach and redirect pass-rushers. With a strong but heavy lower body, Buchanan isn't adept at moving to space to cut off the edge against outside rushes. He'll struggle to meet a defender there with his reach or his feet. He can be redirected from because of his short arms. Defenders who can beat his first step will win.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Christian Westerman, Cincinnati Bengals

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

11. Adam Bisnowaty, Pittsburgh

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    Brynn Anderson/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'6"304 lbs5.23s33 "11 "

    POSITIVES

    A two-time first-team All-ACC selection at tackle, Adam Bisnowaty is a massive man with four years of starting experience under his belt. In 2016, Bisnowaty allowed just one sack and was  consistent in his angles, his timing and his aggressiveness. He plays with an admirable mean streak and finishes blocks with power.         

    Bisnowaty has shown impressive instincts and patience for recognizing and picking up stunts, blitzes and delays. He's a seasoned pro, and defenses won't fool him. His best asset other than experience is his power. He has a strong right-handed punch and will stick defenders on the edge with a stiff left too. His punch is quick and has shown good accuracy for landing in the chest of pass-rushers. When he's balanced and on time, Bisnowaty can shut down bull-rushers with his base.

    NEGATIVES

    Bisnowaty will turn 24 late in his rookie season, which is worth noting. Injuries are a nagging concern for him, as he missed action three times—once with a back injury. Bisnowaty isn't an agile, flexible blocker. He's a waist-bender with poor leverage and pad height at times. Even though he's only 304 pounds, he plays like a much heavier athlete. His hips and his feet won't wow you with quickness or bend. Because of this, he's unlikely to play on the left side of an NFL offensive line. With average length (33 ⅞" arms) and poor agility, Bisnowaty has limited upside as a blocker.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Ben Ijalana, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.75/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 4)

10. Will Holden, Vanderbilt

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    Butch Dill/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'7 ½"311 lbs5.45s33 ¼"10 "

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Vanderbilt—one at right tackle, two at left—Will Holden impressed with his chance at the Reese's Senior Bowl in January. He is a four-time member of the SEC Academic Honor Roll, and NFL teams will love the wiring and IQ they're drafting in him.

    With a 37-game starting streak, Holden is not a risk for injury. He is the son of a Navy man, and his work ethic and drive show on the field. He's a competitor who finishes blocks in the running game and will dump defenders with a mean streak. Holden shows power, patience and good angles in attacking defenders. In pass protection he's able to match strength and shows very good upper-body power to lock on to pass-rushers and shut them down. A patient, poised blocker, Holden is more pro-ready than many of the better athletes at the position.

          

    NEGATIVES

    Holden will be a 24-year-old rookie, the age at which most teams assign a red flag. With 33 ¼-inch arms, he's a little short for the tackle position and may see a move inside to guard. A lack of quickness to space could also hint at a future move inside. Holden isn't great on the corner when protecting the left side. His lack of quickness and burst mean he has to win with length, and in the NFL, his arms just aren't long enough to battle that way. A move to right tackle, where he played as a sophomore, could help.

     

    PRO COMPARISON: Sebastian Vollmer, Free Agent

    FINAL GRADE: 5.90/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 4)

9. David Sharpe, Florida

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    Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'6"343 lbs5.44s35 "10"

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at left tackle for the Florida Gators, David Sharpe entered the draft early following the lead of many of his teammates. Sharpe is a massive man with 35 ⅜-inch arms and 10-inch hands on a 6'6" and 343-pound frame. He's the guy you want walking off the bus first. His power at the point of attack is good when his leverage is right. He's able to catch defenders with his length and has a strong, dominant punch. You won't get Sharpe moving off his spot with power, as he's able to lock down and be a true anchor. When he latches on to a defender in the running game, buckle up—you're going for ride.

    NEGATIVES

    Sharpe tested poorly at the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis—enough that some teams may reject him immediately. A scout we spoke to about Sharpe had harsh criticisms of his decision to declare early. Sharpe only did 19 reps on the bench press and had a vertical jump of 20 ½ inches—both numbers are incredibly low. Sharpe will not work in a zone scheme because of his poor movement skills. He's a liability when asked to get off his spot. Playing right guard may be an option, but even then, he must be able to play laterally.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Trent Brown, San Francisco 49ers

    FINAL GRADE: 5.99/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 4)

8. Roderick Johnson, Florida State

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    Joe Robbins/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'7"298 lbs4.90s36"10 ¾"

    POSITIVES

    A two-and-a-half year starter at left tackle for Florida State, Roderick Johnson has ideal height, length and massive hands. On the hoof, you'll be hard-pressed to find a more impressive player. Johnson blocks like a boxer with quick, well-timed punches to keep defenders off his frame. When forced to recover, he has the length and quickness to slide his feet and get back centered on a defender. Johnson's blocking instincts are well-developed. Given his lack of power, a move to right tackle isn't an option early in his career. Johnson could play there in a pinch, but his best projection is as a left tackle.

    NEGATIVES

    Johnson is a junior entry into the class, and his run-blocking skills are poorly developed. Part of that issue is his height and his poor pad level when asked to get low and blow a defender off the line. He's a classic waist-bender with average knee bend. Defenders can get under his pads and drive him back off the ball both in running and passing situations. His balance wavers at times, and Johnson can panic when pressured with outside speed. A good countermove will beat him every time because he'll overcommit to the outside to cut off defenders at the pass.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Bobby Massie, Chicago Bears

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 3)

7. Julie'n Davenport, Bucknell

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'7"318 lbs5.45s36 ½"10 ½"

            

    POSITIVES

    A two-time team captain and four-year starter at left tackle, Julie'n Davenport has two things you can't coach—size and length. At 6'7" and 318 pounds, he has 36 ½-inch arms and massive 10 ½-inch hands. He's the first guy you want coming off the bus. Davenport has an excellent reach, and his best asset is his punch. He has a quick strike and can get to defenders much earlier than his peers.

    At the Senior Bowl, we saw him knocking back pass-rushers with nice timing and power on the limbs he calls arms. Davenport is a great fit in a zone-blocking scheme, where his length and his movement skills would allow him to cut off defenders in the running game. From a size and strength perspective, Davenport is prototypical.

    NEGATIVES

    A small-school prospect, Davenport isn't ready to make the jump from the Patriot League to the NFL without some bumps along the way. He'll have to speed up his process to keep up with pro pass-rushers. For a big, long guy, Davenport has slow, heavy feet in space. He didn't test or show like a top-tier athlete in predraft events. He has yet to develop blocking instincts, and he'll need time to work out the kinks in his game and build up his timing and his angles.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: T.J. Clemmings, Minnesota Vikings

    FINAL GRADE: 6.10/9.00 (Developmental Prospect—Round 3)

6. Antonio Garcia, Troy

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'6"302 lbs5.15s33 "9 "

    POSITIVES

    Antonio Garcia is a natural athlete with smooth feet in pass protection. Heading into the Senior Bowl, scouts hyped him as a potential Round 1 riser because of his reputation as an athletic edge protector. Garcia started four seasons at Troy and improved each year, finishing with a 2016 that saw him surrender zero sacks, per our scouting.

    Teams wanting versatility will like that Garcia has played both left and right tackle. Garcia's athleticism allows him to move effortlessly to the corner. He can slide, mirror, pull and trap with smooth movements. His hips are equally impressive, and he can open up to kick slide to the corner. While not overly strong, Garcia is a crafty blocker.

    NEGATIVES

    Garcia has a long, lean frame without great bulk in his lower body or power in his upper. He moves like an athlete but hasn't shown the power at the point of attack to handle NFL-level defenders in the running game. If asked to sit down against a bull rush, Garcia has to rely on speed and leverage to win. Matching power-for-power is an issue. NFL teams will want to bulk him up, but doing so always risks a loss of agility and flexibility. Short arms (33 ⅜”) and small hands (9 ⅞”) for his height make an odd measurement.

      

    PRO COMPARISON: Donald Stephenson, Denver Broncos

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 3)

5. Taylor Moton, Western Michigan

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    Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"319 lbs5.18s34 "10 "

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter in college, Taylor Moton comes to the NFL field ready. He's also versatile, having played guard and tackle for Western Michigan. A natural on the right side of the line, Moton has exceptional power and size with massive hands on 34 ⅛-inch arms. He can eat up defenders with his size and his strength at the point of attack. In the running game, he can move men with his forward momentum and has a little mean streak to his game. Moton plays with balance, poise and leverage and has shown the hips to be effective pulling from both the guard and tackle spots.

    NEGATIVES

    Footwork is the biggest issue with Moton. He has to be quicker at getting to space and protecting the corner. Because he's not a fast puncher in pass protection, he'll have to work on getting his feet or his hands caught up to the speed of the NFL. Ideally, Moton learns to play faster and a little lower with his pads. He can get caught backbending and lunging to reach players. Moton isn't the most athletic prospect, so offenses and schemes that want quickness and agility at right guard or tackle won't favor him.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Joe Barksdale, Los Angeles Chargers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.40/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 3)

4. Dion Dawkins, Temple

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    Justin K. Aller/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'4"300 lbs5.27s35"9 "

    POSITIVES

    A starter at left tackle for three seasons, Dion Dawkins may be an NFL guard, but he can't be overlooked as a potential tackle. He is shorter with a squat frame, but he has 35-inch arms and a sturdy lower body. He's a natural bull as a blocker and can use his strength to push around defenders both in the running and in the passing game.

    On the move, Dawkins is quick and fluid. He doesn't have any issues coming off his spot laterally or when getting upfield to the second level. His balance and his power in the lower body could be why some see him as a guard, but it allows him to be a power player at tackle too. He's poised, patient and balanced and never panics. That he can play four offensive line positions and projects as at least a decent starter at all of them adds to Dawkins' value.

    NEGATIVES

    Despite having ideal arm length, Dawkins doesn't always play that way. He has a bad habit of ducking his head into contact and will lose sight of his assigned defender. Dawkins has good initial quickness but can be slow to move to the corner and protect the edge. His timing to get to the second level is the biggest issue in the running game. He can be late and have to play catch-up chasing linebackers. Dawkins hasn't shown the quickness to reach backside edge players on weak-side runs.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Joe Thuney, New England Patriots

    FINAL GRADE: 6.50/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

3. Cam Robinson, Alabama

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    Gregory Payan/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'6"322 lbs5.15s35 ½"10 ½"

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Alabama, Cam Robinson has prototypical NFL size, strength and athleticism. The 2016 season was his best as he showed improved timing, footwork and balance on the left side of the line. In the running game, he can be a bulldozer with his power and his burst. Robinson is explosive off the line and gets his hands into the defender with a tight grip. He gets to the second level with quickness and doesn't have any issue sliding down the line or pulling from the left side.

    His athleticism shines at times and leaves you believing he's a franchise left tackle. In pass protection, Robinson slides well and has the natural athleticism to shut off the corner or redirect and recover to the inside or outside. When patient, Robinson can handle anything you throw at him. With natural power and a very strong base, Robinson can handle bull rushes and has no issue shutting down a player who goes chest-to-chest with him.

    NEGATIVES

    Robinson plays with a high sense of urgency that often throws off his timing and his balance. He gets into stretches of not using his feet to move toward the defender and can look heavy-footed because he's not stepping. That leads to lunges and some poor balance against speed. Robinson was flagged 11 times in 2016 and 12 times in 2015—many of them for holding.

    A power scheme is perfect for Robinson, but some teams may toy with playing him at right tackle or even guard to make up for his footwork struggles. In the summer of 2016, Robinson was arrested for possession of narcotics and a stolen handgun. The chargers were later dropped.                 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Michael Oher, Carolina Panthers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

2. Ryan Ramczyk, Wisconsin

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    David J. Phillip/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'6"310 lbsN/A33 ¾"10 "

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter after transferring from Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Ryan Ramczyk was the Badgers' left tackle in 2016. A smart technician, Ramczyk plays with excellent bend and a quick, mean punch. He's poised with good balance shown when asked to slide laterally. Ramczyk's recovery skills are very good when working to the inside, and he shoots his hands quickly and with power to redirect.

    Ramczyk is able to win in the running game with his quickness and his angles—which is why he may be an All-Pro-level guard if his team develops him there. Playing tackle, Ramczyk has the goods to be a solid starter if he's able to build on the foundation shown in his one year at Wisconsin, where he surrendered just one sack.

    The overall athleticism and instincts he shows on film are very good for a one-year starter. Projecting that forward, he looks like a high-end player. The trouble for NFL teams comes if he doesn’t continue improving as expected.    

    NEGATIVES

    A torn hip labrum shut down Ramczyk for the predraft process. The lack of arm length (33 ¾”)—and a lack of length in his play—could kick Ramczyk inside to guard for some NFL teams. In the running game, he must learn to play with more power. He has to be stronger at the point of attack and work to drive defenders with quicker feet. On the hoof, Ramczyk needs to fill out his frame, but he has narrow shoulders and hips that might limit what gains he can make there. He'll have to learn to compensate with quickness on the edge instead of using length, as defenders can long-arm him and create separation.

    PRO COMPARISON: Taylor Lewan, Tennessee Titans

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

1. Garett Bolles, Utah

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    Gregory Payan/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size
    6'5"297 lbs4.95s34"9 "

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter at Utah after transferring from Snow College, Garett Bolles stepped right into the lineup and made an impact as a left tackle, showing improvement each week. For a player who arrived on Campus in August, Bolles took no time to acclimate to the starting lineup. He's a natural athlete with exceptional flexibility, toughness and movement skills off the line of scrimmage.

    Bolles plays with excellent length and has the overall athleticism to recover to the edge and cut off pass-rushers at the corner. He makes a quick, fluid kick step and has top-tier balance. In the running game, Bolles fires off with burst and quickly get into the frame of defenders. Before arriving at Utah, Bolles was at one point homeless and overcame a rough background (including petty arrests) before finding a mentor, religion and settling down with a wife and family.

    NEGATIVES

    As a one-year player, there is concern about Bolles' ability to acclimate at the next level. He'll be a 25-year-old rookie (birthday in May), which is generally a red flag for NFL teams. At 297 pounds, Bolles is leaner and lighter than the prototype. His ability to maintain and carry an NFL weight could be in question.

    NFL coaches must work on leverage and leg bend with Bolles to account for his tendency to stand up in pass protection. His base strength needs to improve. If drafted into a power-blocking scheme, Bolles could struggle to move defenders at the line of scrimmage. Bolles was flagged 17 times in his lone season.

     

    PRO COMPARISON: Joe Staley, San Francisco 49ers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

    Advanced stats courtesy of Pro Football Focus unless otherwise noted.    

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